AGRICULTURE INVESTMENT FUNDS. AGRICULTURE INVESTMENT

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Agriculture Investment Funds


agriculture investment funds
    investment funds
  • (Investment fund) A term generally interchangeable with "mutual fund."
  • investment: money that is invested with an expectation of profit
  • (Investment fund) A collective investment scheme is a way of investing money with others to participate in a wider range of investments than feasible for most individual investors, and to share the costs and benefits of doing so.
    agriculture
  • Department of Agriculture: the federal department that administers programs that provide services to farmers (including research and soil conservation and efforts to stabilize the farming economy); created in 1862
  • The science or practice of farming, including cultivation of the soil for the growing of crops and the rearing of animals to provide food, wool, and other products
  • farming: the practice of cultivating the land or raising stock
  • agribusiness: a large-scale farming enterprise
agriculture investment funds - Timberland Investments:
Timberland Investments: A Portfolio Perspective
Timberland Investments: A Portfolio Perspective
Timberland supplies the basic raw material for a critical global industry-forest products. Timber can be managed economically as a renewable crop on hundreds of millions of acres in the United States. Given the forces supporting conservation of forests in their natural state on many public and some private lands in the United States and other nations, there is increasing pressure on the remaining privately owned forests to supply the needed timber output. This represents an opportunity for patient, long-term investors. Using insights and graphic examples supplied by experienced institutional investors, professional foresters, forestry and financial researchers, and others, the authors address several questions, such as the following: How do timberland's investment characteristics compare to those associated with other portfolio alternatives? In addition to direct investment in forests, in what other ways can investors participate in the timberland market? Can the addition of timberland to some investors' diversified portfolios improve overall performance? What personal financial planning goals can be served by timberland? What acquisition, forest management, and sale strategies can be adopted by individual and institutional investors so that objectives are achieved? - In the course of addressing such questions, the authors attempt to bridge the communications gap between the investment and forestry communities. The authors provide valuable perspectives not only for individual and institutional investors, but also for personal financial advisors, forestry practitioners, policymakers, researchers, and students of forestry, real estate, and investments.

88% (8)
Grand Theater in Ellsworth, Maine
Grand Theater in Ellsworth, Maine
May, 1933. Franklin Delano Roosevelt had been President for two months. The country was reeling from the ravages of the 1929 stock market crash and subsequent depression. Unemployment, a manageable 4% in early 1929 had ballooned to 25% of the work force. Mortgage foreclosures hit an all time high. Neither the FDIC nor the Federal Reserve System had yet been created, so many who survived the stock market crash lost their life’s savings when banks couldn’t meet their demand for deposited funds. Roosevelt declared a “bank holiday” when all banks in the country were forced to close until bankers and government could regain control of the situation. The banks remained closed for 8 days and then only the best run banks could reopen. Many never did open again. Downeast Maine had been particularly hard hit. The lumber industry dwindled to almost nothing as construction slammed to a halt. The agriculture and fishing industries were plagued by economic failure. And so it was that a mentally troubled dishwasher by the name of Norman Moore overheard two businessmen talking in the Ellsworth diner where he worked. The men had been discussing what could be done about several unused, dilapidated buildings in downtown Ellsworth. Moore heard voices that told him he could solve the problems. By Monday morning, May 8, 1933, after several unsuccessful attempts, Moore had set fires that burned to the ground 130 buildings and most of downtown Ellsworth. The destruction was almost total—Ellsworth would have to rise from the ashes if it was to continue to exist. Approaching the devastation one problem at a time, the City of Ellsworth decided not to just rebuild what they’d had, but began construction of the new and improved Ellsworth. Within four years, the rebirth and regeneration was nothing short of miraculous. A riverside park had been added; the whole downtown shopping area was redesigned; major streets were rerouted. And in April, 1937, the City Council decided to move even further afield by making a major investment in a downtown movie theater. Designed by Boston’s Krokyn & Browne and built by the Bangor contractor, William McPherson, construction started in March, 1938. Four months later, to great acclaim, the Grand opened. Opening night was welcomed with a great flourish. The marquee sparkled, speeches were made, the entire City Council showed up, the Ellsworth High School Band played before the feature film, “Holiday,” starring Katharine Hepburn and Cary Grant. The addition of “another fine building” in Ellsworth’s business district was noted by a local newspaper, “,,,devastated beyond recognition a few years ago but which today needs to bow its head to no city of similar size in New England.” Within weeks, the Ellsworth American was helping bring newsreels to Downeast Maine. The movies of the late 30s and the 1940s were some of the classics—“Gone With The Wind,” “The Wizard of Oz,” “Bambi,” “Samson and Delilah,” and the WWII super-patriotic “Stage Door Canteen.” Movie patrons flocked to The Grand. Author Sanford Phippen says he first realized he wanted to write when he saw the 1954 classic “Rear Window” at The Grand. As successful as the film program was, by the mid-1950s, television was eroding the audience for “the movies.” The attraction of the small screen in the living room was tough competition. In an attempt to offset the drain of TV, a boxing ring was installed and the Grand began a regular schedule of semiprofessional and amateur boxing matches. Though innovative and generally well attended, boxing did not keep The Grand in the black. Ownership changes did little to stem the flow of red ink, though various combinations of film, stage productions, rock ‘n roll, and other diversions were tried. In 1975, a photo-journalist’s article in the Tuesday Weekly newspaper about The Grand caught the attention of local gallery owner, Harris Strong. Strong was a transplant from New Jersey who had moved his business Downeast several years previously. When growing up in New Jersey, he had been active both in straight theater and in Gilbert & Sullivan productions. He had already formed a group called the Ellsworth Players and they had been performing in Ellsworth’s City Hall. He recognized the value of The Grand’s stage and seating. Strong headed an ad hoc group who formed the Hancock Country Auditorium Associates and on March 24, 1975, a nonprofit was formed and purchased The Grand. The place was a mess! Drains were plugged; the ceiling and walls leaked; vandals had damaged windows and doors; the heating plant almost didn’t work; wiring needed replacement. The Associates did the necessary repairs to make The Grand usable again and then added a 12 foot “thrust” or extension to the stage to allow better stage productions…not cramped by the 12 foot stage that had previously existed when The Grand was primarily a movie theater. In the first performance in “the new Grand,” Noel
Governor John Hoeven
Governor John Hoeven
JOHN HOEVEN was sworn in as the state’s 31st Governor in December 2000 and began working to build North Dakota’s future by focusing on six pillars of growth: education, economic development, agriculture, energy, technology and quality of life. Under his leadership, North Dakota has expanded and diversified its economy, adding thousands of new jobs and growing its targeted industry sectors, including value-added agriculture, advanced manufacturing, energy development, technology-based business and tourism. During his term, North Dakota’s personal income growth has outpaced the national average. Today, North Dakota continues to grow its economy. Because of Hoeven’s stewardship, the state ended the last fiscal biennium with a strong reserve for North Dakota’s future. In fact, under the governor’s leadership, the State of North Dakota cut property and income taxes by more than half a billion dollars in the last four years, while continuing to fund priorities like education, health care, law enforcement and other critical areas. His current budget focuses on investments that will continue to stimulate the state’s economy, as well as enhanced support for education, economic development and North Dakota families. In his third term, Hoeven remains committed to enhancing the state’s business climate, reducing taxes and promoting a higher standard of living and a better quality of life for all North Dakotans. Building on previous initiatives, he has advanced new incentives for economic development, renewable energy, and research and development, as well as additional investments in education, including increases for teacher compensation, education equity and adequacy, and expanded funding for Centers of Excellence, an initiative that combines education and economic development to create higher-paying jobs and new business opportunities for North Dakota citizens. Hoeven continues to promote EmpowerND, the state’s first multi-resource energy policy, which he initiated in 2002 as part of North Dakota’s comprehensive economic development strategic plan. EmpowerND has deployed a wide range of incentives for each energy sector, both renewable and traditional, as well as a conservation component. Through EmpowerND, Hoeven has worked to advance energy resources like lignite coal, oil and gas, while at the same time promoting renewable resources, such as wind, ethanol and biodiesel. Protecting North Dakota’s citizens and communities has been an important focus of many of Hoeven’s policies and initiatives, including the introduction of new laws to strengthen the state’s violent and sexual offender statutes, and the expansion of North Dakota’s efforts to combat substance abuse, while helping young people involved with drugs through rehabilitative programs such as North Dakota’s Drug Courts. Hoeven chairs the Governors’ Biofuels Coalition and serves on the Executive Committee of the National Governors Association. He previously served as chair of the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission, the Midwestern Governors Association, and the National Governors Association’s Health and Human Services Committee and Natural Resources Committee. Born in Bismarck, North Dakota, Hoeven earned a bachelor’s degree from Dartmouth College in 1979 and a master’s degree in business administration from Northwestern University in 1981. He served as executive vice president of First Western Bank in Minot from 1986 to 1993, and from 1993 to 2000, served as president and CEO of the Bank of North Dakota, during which time the bank’s assets grew from $900 million to $1.6 billion. Hoeven and his wife Mical (Mikey) have two children, Marcela and Jack.

agriculture investment funds
agriculture investment funds
An Act To authorize the Secretary of Agriculture to make loans to certain entities that agree that the funds will be used to make loans to consumers ... structural improvements and investments.
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