OUTDOOR WOODEN PLAY EQUIPMENT : OUTDOOR WOODEN

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Outdoor Wooden Play Equipment


outdoor wooden play equipment
    equipment
  • The process of supplying someone or something with such necessary items
  • A tool is a device that can be used to produce or achieve something, but that is not consumed in the process. Colloquially a tool can also be a procedure or process used for a specific purpose.
  • The act of equipping, or the state of being equipped, as for a voyage or expedition; Whatever is used in equipping; necessaries for an expedition or voyage; the collective designation for the articles comprising an outfit; equipage; as, a railroad equipment (locomotives, cars, etc.
  • The necessary items for a particular purpose
  • an instrumentality needed for an undertaking or to perform a service
  • Mental resources
    outdoor
  • outdoor(a): located, suited for, or taking place in the open air; "outdoor clothes"; "badminton and other outdoor games"; "a beautiful outdoor setting for the wedding"
  • (outdoors) outside: outside a building; "in summer we play outside"
  • (of a person) Fond of the open air or open-air activities
  • Done, situated, or used out of doors
  • (outdoors) where the air is unconfined; "he wanted to get outdoors a little"; "the concert was held in the open air"; "camping in the open"
    wooden
  • lacking ease or grace; "the actor's performance was wooden"; "a wooden smile"
  • (woodenly) ungraciously: without grace; rigidly; "they moved woodenly"
  • Like or characteristic of wood
  • Made of wood
  • made or consisting of (entirely or in part) or employing wood; "a wooden box"; "an ancient cart with wooden wheels"
  • Stiff and awkward in movement or manner
    play
  • Amuse oneself by engaging in imaginative pretense
  • participate in games or sport; "We played hockey all afternoon"; "play cards"; "Pele played for the Brazilian teams in many important matches"
  • a dramatic work intended for performance by actors on a stage; "he wrote several plays but only one was produced on Broadway"
  • Engage in (a game or activity) for enjoyment
  • a theatrical performance of a drama; "the play lasted two hours"
  • Engage in activity for enjoyment and recreation rather than a serious or practical purpose

USS Niagara- Flagship of Oliver Hazzard Perry
USS Niagara- Flagship of Oliver Hazzard Perry
a stopover for the night- on the way to Montreal HISTORY: The US Brig Niagara or the Flagship Niagara[a], is a wooden-hulled brig[b] that served as the relief flagship for Oliver Hazard Perry in the Battle of Lake Erie during the War of 1812. It is one of last remaining ships from the War of 1812. The Niagara is usually docked behind the Erie Maritime Museum in downtown Erie in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania as an outdoor exhibit for the museum, but travels the Great Lakes during the summer, serving as an ambassador of Pennsylvania when not docked. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1973 and was designated the official state ship of Pennsylvania by the Pennsylvania General Assembly in 1988. The Niagara was constructed from 1812 to 1813 to protect the vulnerable American coastline on Lake Erie from the British and played a pivotal role in the battle for the lake. Along with most of warships that served in the war, the Niagara was sunk for preservation on Presque Isle in 1820. Raised in 1913, it was rebuilt for the centennial of the Battle of Lake Erie. After deteriorating, restoration of the Niagara was started again in the 1930s, but was hampered by the lack of funds caused by the Great Depression and remained uncompleted until 1963. A more extensive restoration was carried out in 1988 in which much of the original ship was largely destroyed. The incorporation of new materials and modern equipment makes it ambiguous as to whether it is or is not a replica. Contents [show] Construction In the beginning of September 1812, Daniel Dobbins, a merchant on the Great Lakes, arrived in Washington, D.C. to warn the United States government of the vulnerability of the Lake Erie coastline to a British attack.[4] Dobbins had been captured by the British after a surprise attack at Fort Mackinac in Michigan but, was able to negotiate his release. Dobbins was briefly detained again by the British in Detroit after the city was captured.[4] After several days of discussions with President James Madison and Secretary of the Navy Paul Hamilton, Dobbins convinced them that the safest place to build a fleet was in the sheltered bay formed by Presque Isle at Erie, Pennsylvania. On September 15, Hamilton authorized Dobbins to construct four gunboats.[5] Hamilton also granted $2,000 to be used for the construction and appointed Dobbins, a civilian, to the rank of sailing master in the United States Navy. On December 31, Captain Isaac Chauncey, the commander of naval forces on Lake Ontario, arrived in Erie for a day, made some alterations to Dobbins' ship design and authorized him to build, additionally, two brigs.[6] Oliver Hazard Perry was promoted to commodore in February 1813 and was given orders to report to Erie from Newport, Rhode Island. Perry arrived in Erie on March 26, after being held up in Sackets Harbor, New York for two weeks by Chauncey in case of a possible attack by the British.[7] The construction of the fleet was largely supervised by Noah Brown, a shipwright brought in from New York City.[6] The keels of two brigs were each constructed out of a single 14-by-18-inch (360 ? 460 mm) black oak log.[6] Due to a lack of iron, the timbers that made up the hulls were joined using wooden pins called treenails. In place of the oakum and pitch normally used to caulk ships, lead was used.[8] The timbers used in the brigs were still green, as the builders did not have the luxury of time to allow the wood to dry properly. A total of 65 cannons were shipped to Erie to arm the fleet; Hamilton approved the production of 37 cannons by a foundry in Washington, D.C. and the rest were moved from Sackets Harbor.[6][9] The Tigress and the Porcupine were launched in April 1813, the Scorpion in May, and the brig Lawrence on June 25.[9][10] The Niagara was launched on July 4 along with the Ariel.[10][11] One of the strategic advantages of building a fleet in Erie was that the bay formed by Presque Isle was cut off from the Lake Erie by a sandbar, which prevented British warships from being able to enter the bay. The brigs Niagara and Lawrence both had a draft 9 feet (2.7 m), which was too deep to cross the sandbar. On August 4, the Niagara was pulled onto the sandbar using its anchor in a technique called kedging and was lightened by removing its cannons and ballast. A pair of 90-by-40-foot (27 by 12 m) barges, called "camels", were placed on either side of the ship.[12] The camels were sunk and secured to the Niagara. The water was pumped out of the camel, lifting the ship. By the following day, the Niagara was safely over the sandbar and was rearmed; the Lawrence was floated over the sandbar a couple of days before the Niagara. During the construction, the area was usually under daily surveillance by the British.[13] On the day the Lawrence crossed the sandbar, a pair of British warships, the Queen Charlotte and the Lady Prevost, observed for an hour and failed to notice the actions of Perry.[14] W
Flagship Niagara at Kingston
Flagship Niagara at Kingston
a stopover for the night- on the way to Montreal HISTORY: The US Brig Niagara or the Flagship Niagara[a], is a wooden-hulled brig[b] that served as the relief flagship for Oliver Hazard Perry in the Battle of Lake Erie during the War of 1812. It is one of last remaining ships from the War of 1812. The Niagara is usually docked behind the Erie Maritime Museum in downtown Erie in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania as an outdoor exhibit for the museum, but travels the Great Lakes during the summer, serving as an ambassador of Pennsylvania when not docked. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1973 and was designated the official state ship of Pennsylvania by the Pennsylvania General Assembly in 1988. The Niagara was constructed from 1812 to 1813 to protect the vulnerable American coastline on Lake Erie from the British and played a pivotal role in the battle for the lake. Along with most of warships that served in the war, the Niagara was sunk for preservation on Presque Isle in 1820. Raised in 1913, it was rebuilt for the centennial of the Battle of Lake Erie. After deteriorating, restoration of the Niagara was started again in the 1930s, but was hampered by the lack of funds caused by the Great Depression and remained uncompleted until 1963. A more extensive restoration was carried out in 1988 in which much of the original ship was largely destroyed. The incorporation of new materials and modern equipment makes it ambiguous as to whether it is or is not a replica. Contents [show] Construction In the beginning of September 1812, Daniel Dobbins, a merchant on the Great Lakes, arrived in Washington, D.C. to warn the United States government of the vulnerability of the Lake Erie coastline to a British attack.[4] Dobbins had been captured by the British after a surprise attack at Fort Mackinac in Michigan but, was able to negotiate his release. Dobbins was briefly detained again by the British in Detroit after the city was captured.[4] After several days of discussions with President James Madison and Secretary of the Navy Paul Hamilton, Dobbins convinced them that the safest place to build a fleet was in the sheltered bay formed by Presque Isle at Erie, Pennsylvania. On September 15, Hamilton authorized Dobbins to construct four gunboats.[5] Hamilton also granted $2,000 to be used for the construction and appointed Dobbins, a civilian, to the rank of sailing master in the United States Navy. On December 31, Captain Isaac Chauncey, the commander of naval forces on Lake Ontario, arrived in Erie for a day, made some alterations to Dobbins' ship design and authorized him to build, additionally, two brigs.[6] Oliver Hazard Perry was promoted to commodore in February 1813 and was given orders to report to Erie from Newport, Rhode Island. Perry arrived in Erie on March 26, after being held up in Sackets Harbor, New York for two weeks by Chauncey in case of a possible attack by the British.[7] The construction of the fleet was largely supervised by Noah Brown, a shipwright brought in from New York City.[6] The keels of two brigs were each constructed out of a single 14-by-18-inch (360 ? 460 mm) black oak log.[6] Due to a lack of iron, the timbers that made up the hulls were joined using wooden pins called treenails. In place of the oakum and pitch normally used to caulk ships, lead was used.[8] The timbers used in the brigs were still green, as the builders did not have the luxury of time to allow the wood to dry properly. A total of 65 cannons were shipped to Erie to arm the fleet; Hamilton approved the production of 37 cannons by a foundry in Washington, D.C. and the rest were moved from Sackets Harbor.[6][9] The Tigress and the Porcupine were launched in April 1813, the Scorpion in May, and the brig Lawrence on June 25.[9][10] The Niagara was launched on July 4 along with the Ariel.[10][11] One of the strategic advantages of building a fleet in Erie was that the bay formed by Presque Isle was cut off from the Lake Erie by a sandbar, which prevented British warships from being able to enter the bay. The brigs Niagara and Lawrence both had a draft 9 feet (2.7 m), which was too deep to cross the sandbar. On August 4, the Niagara was pulled onto the sandbar using its anchor in a technique called kedging and was lightened by removing its cannons and ballast. A pair of 90-by-40-foot (27 by 12 m) barges, called "camels", were placed on either side of the ship.[12] The camels were sunk and secured to the Niagara. The water was pumped out of the camel, lifting the ship. By the following day, the Niagara was safely over the sandbar and was rearmed; the Lawrence was floated over the sandbar a couple of days before the Niagara. During the construction, the area was usually under daily surveillance by the British.[13] On the day the Lawrence crossed the sandbar, a pair of British warships, the Queen Charlotte and the Lady Prevost, observed for an hour and failed to notice the actions of Perry.[14]

outdoor wooden play equipment
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