FLOWER BULBS WHOLESALE - FLOWER BULBS

Flower bulbs wholesale - Flower corsage for prom.

Flower Bulbs Wholesale


flower bulbs wholesale
    flower bulbs
  • (Flower bulb) A bulb is a short stem with fleshy leaves or leaf bases . The leaves often function as food storage organs during dormancy .
    wholesale
  • the selling of goods to merchants; usually in large quantities for resale to consumers
  • at a wholesale price; "I can sell it to you wholesale"
  • Sell (goods) in large quantities at low prices to be retailed by others
  • sweeping: ignoring distinctions; "sweeping generalizations"; "wholesale destruction"
flower bulbs wholesale - Narcissus Ziva
Narcissus Ziva Paperwhites, 10 bulbs - 17+cm
Narcissus Ziva Paperwhites, 10 bulbs - 17+cm
This is the classic paperwhite, the fastest from bulb to bloom and the hands-down easiest. Just three or four growing in a bowl with pebbles will perfume an entire room with their sweet, musky scent. Start pots of these every 10 days and you'll have fragrance to carry you through until spring flowers are blooming outdoors. Or buy a pretty bowl - antique, colored glass or whatever strikes your fancy - and give it, with 3 to 5 ready-to-sprout bulbs and a cup or two of pebbles to anyone who loves flowers. Add a free copy of our growing instructions, see the link below. Success is guaranteed. For gardeners in zones 8-10 these will scent your early spring garden wonderfully and add bobbing white, snippable blooms to your flowerbeds. Deer and rodent proof.

76% (19)
Zephyranthes spp.
Zephyranthes spp.
i shot it at R&R Tapah.. heading north.. ;) Zephyranthes is a genus of about 70 species in the Amaryllis family. Common names for species in this genus include fairy lily, rainflower, zephyr lily, magic lily and rain lily. According Meerow et al., cladistics suggests that they are native to the Americas. This is important to mention since several species have become naturalized (sometimes unintentionally) in distant places like Hawaii, Indonesia, and Thailand. The species that are native to the higher altitudes in Mexico (e.g. Z. lindleyana) and parts of North America (e.g. Z. longifolia) or Argentina (e.g. Z. candida) represent the species having the greatest potential for cold hardiness. These perennial geophytes are remarkable for the many ecological niches they tolerate (periodically wet soil to desert conditions), and have many ornamental characteristics worth preserving. Care should be taken with the plants since many of the parts, leaves, bulbs etc. are toxic. Although the genus has been evaluated for possible medicinal properties the biochemically toxic compounds are things like alkaloids. (Kojima et al 1997.) Species in the genus which are listed in this article, vary in morphology. Characteristics such as bulb size, tunic color, and leaf morphology help to identify the species. Foliage in the wild is often ephemeral, but under cultivation becomes more persistent. Leaf color ranges from the bright grassy green of Z. candida (shown in the photo) to rather broad glaucous colored foliage such as Z. drummondii. A few of the species have distinct bronze tints in the foliage when grown in bright light. Size of leaves in these species, ranges from dark green and tiny grassy leaves in species like Z.jonesi or Z. longifolia, to broader, glaucous leaves in species like Z. drummondii, and perhaps largest of all, the cultivar commonly known as "Horsetail Falls" which has handsome broad leaves almost like a Hippeastrum. Flower color in the species ranges from white to yellow (various tints of this color from lemon to sulfur) and pink. Zephyranthes have erect flower stalks which support a flower that may be upward facing or slightly nodding. The funnel-shaped, flowers with six petals can be crocus shaped, but may also open flat such as in Z.jonesii or even reflex slightly. The flowers of some species have a sweet, pleasant fragrance. Fragrance appears to be recessive in crosses, but there are a few species or hybrids, Z. drummondii (white), Z. morrisclintae (pink)and Z.jonesii (light yellow), that all carry the trait. At least 2 of these open their flowers at night and are attractive to nocturnal insects. The flowers typically last only for a day or two; but new flowers may appear in a succession of blooms, especially during humid or rainy weather. Various members of the genus may bloom spring only or repeat and continue into autumn, often a few days after rainstorms thus one of the common names, rainlilies. Periods of synchronous bloom, which breeders have dubbed 'blitzes', are part of their ornamental value, but also times breeders exploit for the purpose of producing new hybrids. (Marta 2005) Most species under cultivation will bloom without the naturally imposed drought and wet that occurs in nature. Greenhouse grown plants bloom very freely but cycle through periods of bloom. One of the longest blooming of all the species is Z. primulina which blooms from April until October. Although it is apomictic, it is a choice parent for crosses because of its rapid repeat flowering trait and long bloom season. Some other species such as Z. Morrisclintae appear to bloom only in the spring season. Most of these species are easily propagated vegetatively via offsets or twin scaling. A few of them such a Z.clintae are slow to produce increase. Unusual phenotypes can be preserved vegetatively. Sexual reproduction is via seed. The apomictic species freely set seed and faithfully reproduce the maternal phenotype. Sterility in hybrids can be problematic;reasons for this are mentioned below. Seed usually is best sown quickly after harvest, although short term storage can be successful. Maiden seedling can be brought into bloom for some of the hybrid in 8-12 after sowing in ideal conditions. This is great for doing necessary checks for apomixis. Currently these plants are grown in the garden in USDA zones 7 and higher. Hopefully with some attention from breeders new cultivar might increase the plants' cold hardiness. Often the plants are sold in nurseries already potted up, this is a great benefit since the growth cycle is not interrupted. Dried bulbs are marketed wholesale and rarely may be slow to rebloom. Such bulbs usually recover once they have a long growing season after rooting out. Breeding with these species has some inherent difficulties summarized by M. RoyChowdhury (2006 JAAS) as ranging from pseudogamy and apomixis, differences in chromosome number and varying times of flowering.
G.F. Mercer & Sons (Bristol)
G.F. Mercer & Sons (Bristol)
G. F. Mercer started work in the fruit trade before venturing out on his own in 1928 to sell fruit and vegetables in St Nicholas Market where he stayed for 25 years. For four years he ran his market stall on his own in the days when people enjoyed seasonal supplies of fresh, locally grown produce from the farms and market gardens within reach of Bristol. The railway company carried local produce to Bristol from the Vale of Evesham in neighbouring Worcestershire and also from Cornwall and Devon. People then did not expect to eat out of season produce unless wealthy enough to run their own hot houses or to pay unrealistic prices. Except for South African apples and oranges foreign fruit and vegetables were rarely seen and, in general, considered inferior to - home grown produce. In 1932 Ron, the first of G F Mercer’s two sons, joined his father’s business to be followed, in turn, by Ron’s sons Allen, Stephen and Neil as the nation recovered from the Great Depression of 1929 and the early thirties. Everyone turned their hand to whatever work had to be done from heaving one hundredweight (ll2lbs or 55kgs) sacks of potatoes and the 100lbs barrels of apples from Canada. Other vegetables and fruit were delivered in bushel sacks, nets and boxes, all of which were measured by volume giving a variable weight according to the crop. Once these had been stowed came the vital work of unpacking and displaying the goods to their best advantage to attract the eye of discerning and cost conscious buyers. In the wholesale business buyers expect that the unopened goods to be of equal quality to those on display. The second world war was as difficult for middlemen as it was for housewives and caterers as all were subject to rigorous rationing. British farming expanded from its depressed dog and stick state of the interwar years to successfully providing the bulk of the food upon which we depended. Private cultivation of urban allotments rendered many families all but independent of greengrocers and their wholesalers as the nation worked overtime to feed itself. School children were given time off lessons to pick fruit from the grower’s farm. During the rationing which continued well into the 1950s Mercers practically had to restart a business which had almost hibernated during the war years. The boom years of the 50s, 60s and 70s created a demand for new, exotic and foreign species of fruit and vegetables which Mercers met with imported produce. Some of this, such as the ever popular capsicums or peppers, is now produced by domestic growers. Today wholesalers can tap the warmer Mediterranean climatic zones found around the globe not to mention the greenhouses of the EU and the UK itself. Unfortunately as almost 50% of British orchards have disappeared in the face of French and Commonwealth competition some of our most tasty fruits are now endangered rare breeds! . The Mercers now have three generations of knowledge and expertise of their market which has expanded to include readily available cut flowers imported from Dutch and Channel Island growers to supplement the home grown supplies from the bulb fields of East Anglia and the appropriately named Holland area of Lincolnshire. Family policy is to avoid storing flowers so that trade buyers can pass to their retail customers fresh flowers in the peak of their condition. Fruit and vegetables are today delivered in what ship shape Bristolians would regard as ‘tiddly’ little boxes weighing a mere 30lbs (l3kgs), while the 28lb nets of sprouts can be thrown from hand to hand. Even the half hundredweight bags of potatoes can be easily slung onto a shoulder if there is no convenient fork lift truck to run a pallet load from place to place. As always the Mercer family stake their sound reputation on satisfying their customers with first class quality and freshness of all their stock of fruit, flowers and vegetables.

flower bulbs wholesale
flower bulbs wholesale
Delft Blue Hyacinth 10 Bulbs -Soft Blue/White- FRAGRANT
"Delft Blue" opens soft blue florets with each petal edged in white. A really magnificent flower.
Planting Hyacinths: Daffodils may be the symbol of spring. Tulips add dramatic color. But its the hyacinths that bring the perfume. One of the most powerfully fragranced blooms in the flower kingdom is the justly famous Dutch hyacinth--the result of hundreds of years of hybridizing a lovely little wildflower from Turkey--now an upright torch of incredible color and unmatched perfume.
Plant your hyacinth bulbs close together for a dramatic display, either in groups of one color or as a rainbow of several shades. Many gardeners think they look best in close groups of 3, 5 or more. Hyacinths must have good drainage, so be sure to plant them where they'll never be in standing water. With some shade, the flowers will last longer than in full sun. And next spring, don't forget to stop and smell the hyacinths!

Comments