COUNTRY HOME DECOR CATALOGS : COUNTRY HOME

Country Home Decor Catalogs : High End Nursery Decor

Country Home Decor Catalogs


country home decor catalogs
    country home
  • The English country house is generally accepted as a large house or mansion, once in the ownership of an individual who also usually owned another great house in town allowing one to spend time in the country and in the city.
  • Country Home was a country lifestyle magazine, published by Meredith Corporation. The magazine featured decorating and collecting, food and entertaining, fashion and well-being, travel and shopping.
  • (Country Homes) Country Homes is a census-designated place (CDP) in Spokane County, Washington, United States. The population was 5,203 at the 2000 census.
    catalogs
  • Make a systematic list of (items of the same type)
  • (catalog) catalogue: make a catalogue, compile a catalogue; "She spends her weekends cataloguing"
  • Enter (an item) in such a list
  • (catalog) a book or pamphlet containing an enumeration of things; "he found it in the Sears catalog"
  • List (similar situations, qualities, or events) in succession
  • (catalog) a complete list of things; usually arranged systematically; "it does not pretend to be a catalog of his achievements"
    decor
  • The decoration and scenery of a stage
  • Interior design is a multi-faceted profession in which creative and technical solutions are applied within a structure to achieve a built interior environment.
  • The style of decoration of a room, building
  • The furnishing and decoration of a room
  • interior decoration: decoration consisting of the layout and furnishings of a livable interior
country home decor catalogs - Cotton Quilt
Cotton Quilt Block Print Patterns from India (qlt001)
Cotton Quilt Block Print Patterns from India (qlt001)
These extra light quilts are made from pure natural cottons, in brilliant hand block print patterns in the state of Rajasthan. Exquisitely printed in a wide variety of designs, these beautiful quilts provide an amazing degree of warmth and coziness. Curl up with one of these quilts and enjoy the luxury of smooth and cozy evening in total relaxation. It is so light that you can slip inside and not feel the weight of the quilt at all yet it is so warm it can be used in cold winters. The lightness is because of special cotton grown only in Rajasthan. This cotton is made lighter through a beating process mastered by the Rajasthan craftsmen. A very thin handloom cotton fabric used on quilts, which is printed using the direct hand block printing method. The main tools for printing are wooden blocks in different shapes and sizes called Buntas. The intricate designs that are to be printed are sketched manually on the outer cast of the block. Most of the designs are inspired from traditional motifs and mother Nature. Each block has wooden handles and free cylindrical holes for free air passage and to allow release of excess printing paste. Now the fabric is washed free of starch and soft bleached to remove the natural gray. The fabric is then stretched over the printing table and fastened to pins. The printer uses more of his expertise and experience while defining the printing area. He uses small wooden trolleys with racks on wheels to facilitate free movement as he drags it along as he prints the designs one by one, in an amazing symmetry. The printing begins from left to right and repeated until the finish. After the block is placed on the fabric, it is slammed hard on the back of the block handle to get a good impression on the fabric. Common standard colors are black, red, maroon, orange, mustard and brown. After printing, the fabric is processed with an acid wash and it is then that the final color is established.

77% (8)
Pleading
Pleading
Name: Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema Born: Dronryp, Netherlands 8 January 1836 Died: Wiesbaden, Germany 25 June 1912 Born Lourens Tadema (Alma being his middle name) in Dronryp, Friesland, to Pieter Tadema, a notary, and his second wife Hinke Brouwer - from an early age he showed some artistic ability and the beginnings of his highly methodical and exacting nature as demonstrated in his paintings to follow. He only adopted the now familiar form of his name after moving to London in 1870. At the age of 16 he enrolled at the Antwerp Academy where he studied under Gustav Wappers and, later, Nicaise de Keyser, both exponents of the Romantic movement in art. Later he became an assistant to the historical painter Baron Hendryk Leys whilst living in the house of an archaeologist, Louis de Taye. From these two men he began to develop his interest in history and archaeology , which was further developed from contact with the German Egytologist, Georg Ebers (later to become one of his biographers). He assisted Leys in painting historical murals in Antwerp's Town Hall. His early works depicted the history of the Merovingian dynasty, rulers of Gaul from the 6th to 8th centuries AD. However, having visited the International Exhibition in London in 1862, he became inspired by the Elgin Marbles and Egyptian artefacts in the British Museum, leading him to turn increasingly to Egyptian themes in his work. In 1863 he married a French woman, Marie Pauline Gressin de Boisgirard, and they honeymooned in Italy where he encountered the newly-excavated ruins of Pompeii. So fascinated was he by the Roman remains with their preponderance of marble that, within a few years, ancient Roman subject matter came to the fore in his work. The Tademas soon moved to Paris where Lourens entered into a long-term contract with the well-known art dealer Ernest Gambart, an influential man with connections throughout Europe. Within a short time he transported his studio to Brussels. However, in the 1860's, tragedy struck: his only son dying of smallpox in 1865 and his wife died in 1869, leaving him to care for his two daughters Anna and Laurence. But fortune in his career followed swiftly and, in that year, two of his paintings - A Roman Art Lover and Phyrric Dance - were exhibited at the Royal Academy in London. The latter work prompted the famous critic and writer John Ruskin to comment that: " ... the general effect was exactly like a microscopic view of a small detachment of black-beetles in search of a dead rat." Fortunately, this was one of very few adverse criticisms and, so well were his paintings received overall that, upon visiting England the same year to see a doctor, and in part due to the possible impending Prussian invasion of France, he moved his home to London in 1870. The following year he married his seventeen-year-old pupil, Laura Epps, a doctor's daughter and member of a then well-known family of cocoa manufacturers. In 1873 he became a naturalized British citizen, at the same time consciously joining his middle name, Alma, to his surname. He didn't actually hyphenate it himself, but it was done by others and this has since become the convention. It also had the fortuitous 'side-effect' of elevating his name to a top position in alphabetical catalogues! Soon after remarrying, they moved from a rented home in Camden Square to Townshend House, near Regent's Park. Elegant and cosmopolitan in decor, their home soon became a popular venue for gatherings of fellow artists. Fame and prosperity soon followed and in 1876 Alma-Tadema became an Associate of the Royal Academy, being elected to a full Royal Academician in 1879. The Grosvenor Gallery staged an exhibition of 287 of his paintings in 1882 - he had become one of the most famous painters in Britain. 'Building' on this success, he developed plans for a more spectacular home - the building for which he found in Grove End Road, St John's Wood. In fact it was the former home of James Tissot which had been abandoned by the artist in 1882 after the death of his mistress, Kathleen Newton. It was then fairly modest but had a number of classical features which appealed to him (such as the famous colonnade beside a garden pond, which featured in several of Tissot's canvases - see our reproduction TIJ001). However Alma-Tadema made it into almost a palace, designing every detail himself - from the weather vane in the form of an artist's palette and the doorway modelled on one from Pompeii, to the rainspouts in the form of lions' heads. The hall was lined with panels painted by fellow artists and the enormous galleried and marble-floored studio was crowned with a polished aluminium dome - the brightness of the light it reflected noticeably affected his paintings from then on. Both of his London homes were famous for their extravagant and well-attended parties, often in fancy dress - the artist himlself having a predilection for dressing as Nero - and where music was alwa
Comparisons 1892
Comparisons 1892
Born Lourens Tadema (Alma being his middle name) in Dronryp, Friesland, to Pieter Tadema, a notary, and his second wife Hinke Brouwer - from an early age Alma-Tadema showed artistic ability and the beginnings of his highly methodical and exacting nature as demonstrated in his subsequent paintings. He only adopted the now familiar form of his name after moving to London in 1870. At the age of 16 Alma-Tadema enrolled at the Antwerp Academy where he studied under Gustav Wappers and Nicaise de Keyser, both exponents of the Romantic movement in art. Later he became an assistant to the historical painter Baron Hendryk Leys whilst living in the house of an archaeologist, Louis de Taye. From these two men he began to develop his interest in history and archaeology, which was further developed by contact with the German Egytologist, Georg Ebers. He assisted Leys in painting historical murals in Antwerp's Town Hall. His early works depicted the history of the Merovingian dynasty, rulers of Gaul from the 6th to 8th centuries AD. However, having visited the International Exhibition in London in 1862, he became inspired by the Elgin Marbles and Egyptian artefacts in the British Museum, leading him to turn ever more towards Egyptian themes. In 1863 he married a French woman, Marie Pauline Gressin de Boisgirard, and they honeymooned in Italy where he encountered the newly-found ruins of Pompeii. So fascinated was he by the Roman remains with their abundance of marble that very quickly ancient Roman subject matter came to the fore in his paintings. The Tademas soon moved to Paris where Lourens entered into a long-term contract with the well-known art dealer Ernest Gambart, an influential man with connections throughout Europe. Within a short time he relocated his studio to Brussels. But in the 1860s, tragedy struck: his only son dying of smallpox in 1865 and his wife in 1869, leaving him to care for his two daughters Anna and Laurence. But fortune in his career followed swiftly and, in the same year, two of his paintings - A Roman Art Lover and Phyrric Dance - were exhibited at the Royal Academy in London. So well were his paintings received overall that, upon visiting England the same year to see a doctor, and in part due to the possible Prussian invasion of France, Alma-Tadema moved his home to London in 1870. The following year he married his seventeen-year-old pupil, Laura Epps, a doctor's daughter and member of a then well-known family of cocoa manufacturers. In 1873 he became a naturalized British citizen, at the same time consciously joining his middle name, Alma, to his surname. The hyphenation was in fact done by others and this has since become the convention. It also had the fortuitous 'side-effect' of elevating his name to a top position in alphabetical catalogues! Soon after marriage, the Tademas moved from a rented home in Camden Square to Townshend House, near Regent's Park. Elegant and cosmopolitan in decor, their home soon became a popular venue for gatherings of fellow artists. Fame and prosperity soon followed and in 1876 Alma-Tadema became an Associate of the Royal Academy, being elected to a full Royal Academician in 1879. The Grosvenor Gallery staged an exhibition of 287 of his paintings in 1882. He had become one of the most famous painters in Britain. 'Building' on this success, Alma-Tadema drew up plans for a more spectacular home - the building for which he found in St John's Wood. In fact it was the former home of French artist James Tissot that had been abandoned after the death of his mistress, Kathleen Newton. It was then fairly modest but had a number of classical features that appealed to him (such as the famous colonnade beside a garden pond, which featured in several of Tissot's canvases). However Alma-Tadema made it into almost a palace, designing every detail himself - from the weather vane in the form of an artist's palette and the doorway modelled on one from Pompeii, to the rainspouts in the form of lions' heads. The hall was lined with panels painted by fellow artists and the enormous galleried and marble-floored studio was crowned with a polished aluminium dome - the brightness of the light it reflected noticeably affected his paintings from then on. Both of his London homes were famous for their extravagant parties, often in fancy dress - the artist himlself having a predilection for dressing as Nero - and where music was always a feature. Distinguished guests included personalities such as Tchaikovsky and Enrico Caruso. Alma-Tadema received awards and honours from around the world, although notably not from his own country of birth - including a knighthood from Britain in 1899 followed by the prestigious Order of Merit in 1905. His clients included members of the British Royal family and the Russian Imperial Family - he was in fact a noted Society portraitist. Indeed approximately 60 of his 400 plus paintings are commissioned portraits of sitters ranging from the Britis

country home decor catalogs
country home decor catalogs
Winsome Wood Computer Desk, Honey
Featuring a broad desktop perfect for the monitor and a pull-out keyboard tray disguised as a drawer, this computer desk is classic and sturdy.The Honey Pine finish gives it a polished and sleek look.Mix and match with the rest of the Studio Home Office

These days, home offices are often as busy as their corporate counterparts--and they need to be equally efficient and organized. Winsome Wood offers a line of modular furniture to supply just that while also presenting a clean, inviting style that blends well with domestic decors. This solid beechwood computer desk features a large, open workspace accompanied by a pullout keyboard that stows behind the faux drawer front. The Honey finish is warm and casual, and the slender legs keep the overall look light and airy. Add the writing desk, corner table, printer stand, file cabinet, and bookshelf to customize any space. This desk measures 42 inches wide by 20 inches deep by 29 inches high. Assembly is required. --Kara Karll

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