GLASS SHADES REPLACEMENTS. SHADES REPLACEMENTS

GLASS SHADES REPLACEMENTS. CANOPY LAWN CHAIRS

Glass Shades Replacements


glass shades replacements
    replacements
  • The action or process of replacing someone or something
  • (replacement) the act of furnishing an equivalent person or thing in the place of another; "replacing the star will not be easy"
  • A person or thing that takes the place of another
  • (replacement) substitution: an event in which one thing is substituted for another; "the replacement of lost blood by a transfusion of donor blood"
  • (replacement) refilling: filling again by supplying what has been used up
    shades
  • (shade) relative darkness caused by light rays being intercepted by an opaque body; "it is much cooler in the shade"; "there's too much shadiness to take good photographs"
  • Cover, moderate, or exclude the light of
  • sunglasses: spectacles that are darkened or polarized to protect the eyes from the glare of the sun; "he was wearing a pair of mirrored shades"
  • Screen from direct light
  • Darken or color (an illustration or diagram) with parallel pencil lines or a block of color
  • (shade) shadow: cast a shadow over
    glass
  • A hard, brittle substance, typically transparent or translucent, made by fusing sand with soda, lime, and sometimes other ingredients and cooling rapidly. It is used to make windows, drinking containers, and other articles
  • Any similar substance that has solidified from a molten state without crystallizing
  • A thing made from, or partly from, glass, in particular
  • furnish with glass; "glass the windows"
  • a brittle transparent solid with irregular atomic structure
  • a container for holding liquids while drinking
glass shades replacements - Replacement Hurricane
Replacement Hurricane Glass, Small
Replacement Hurricane Glass, Small
Similar in shape to our EC1001 globes, the BS1065G is simply smaller. All of our glass products are blown glass. Imperfections will be present, and are considered normal.This globe measures 7 3/4 inches tall overall, one inch of of which is the base. The top opening is 4 3/4 inches in diameter. The base has an exterior measurement of 1 5/8 inches, and the interior opening is 1 3/8 inches across. The globes weigh 8 ounces each. Please measure your candle holders very carefully prior to ordering. Even 1/8 inch difference in diameter can cause the glass to not fit. For comparison purposes, the BS1065G small glass is pictured alongside our standard size EC1001 globe. The BS1065G globe is smaller in stature, but maintains the same elegant fluted shape as the larger EC1001. Please measure your candle holders very carefully prior to ordering. Even 1/8 inch difference in diameter can cause the glass to not fit. The most important measurement to consider is the interior diameter of your hurricane cup. Measure the opening on the inside, and be sure to order a globe that has a smaller base diameter than the hurricane cup.

75% (9)
Lever House
Lever House
390 Park Avenue, Midtown Manhattan, Manhattan, New York City, New York, United States Lever House, situated on the west side of Park Avenue between East 53rd Street and East 54th Street is a 24-story glass and stainless steel clad office building composed of a vertical slab rising above a horizontal base. Its construction in 1950-52 heralded the beginning of a new wave of American skyscraper construction and a new synthesis of modernist architectural ideals. Since the time of its completion, its crystalline forms and glazed curtain walls have attracted world attention. It has assumed a major role in the literature of modern architecture and has been wide ]y recognized as a key monument in the evolution of the International Style. Lever House also heralded the almost complete transformation of Park Avenue that took place in the years following 1952. The mile-long stretch, of Park Avenue from the Grand Central complex to Last 59th Street changed in a single decade from an avenue of traditional masonry apartment houses to one of .lass and steel office buildings. Lever House was the first New York real estate venture to take advantage of a zoning provision which permitted a building to rise with no setbacks provided that the building covered only 25 percent of the lot. As a result, Lever House broke the tradition of "shaped tower" skyscrapers which had prevailed since the 1910s. Lever House introduced many innovations into skyscraper design that were to be much imitated. The most obvious was the use of glass covering almost 100 percent of the visible facades, as well as an integrally designed window-washing mechanism to keep it clean. It also introduced the concept of opening a portion of the ground floor to public use and of providing an open courtyard at its base. This last feature was later to become, in the form of the open plaza, almost a standard component of New York office building development. Above the ground floor the building serves solely to house the offices of the Lever Brothers Company, an American manufacturer of household products whose desire for a New York headquarters of outstanding design - resulted in a major architectural statement. Lever Brothers Company The Lever Brothers Company traces its American origi ns to iSSS when Vi lliam Hesketh Lever (1851-1925), a British manufacturer of "Sun 1i gh t" scum , toured the The Site In 1815 the site of the present Lever House was part of a farm owned by Charles McEvers, whose house stood on the western end of his property near Fifth Avenue.-^ His tract stretched from the imaginary line of Fifth Avenue to that of Fourth Avenue (later Park Avenue). The history of Fourth Avenue, however, really begins with the advent of the railroads. In 1834 the New York and Harlem railroad first carried passengers along newly laid tracks down the center of Fourth Avenue from 42nd Street to 96th Street. By 1848 the New Haven Railroad entered Manhattan along Fourth Avenue. Due to increased noise, smoke, and danger of fire and injury, the city government directed the railroads to depress the tracks along the avenue. As railroad traffic increased, more space was needed to lay additional tracks. By 1881 Fourth Avenue was widened to .140 feet. The trains ran in an open cut below grade south of 56th Street. On either side of the depressed tracks were 27-foot wide roadways and 15-foot wide sidewalks. North of 56th Street the tracks were partially covered over with a "beam tunnel." — consisting of raised planted malls running down the center of the boulevard. Within these planted malls open wells provided light and ventilation to the tracks below. The overall effect of the landscaped "beam tunnels" was widely admired,although the smoke and noise must have poured out from the open wells. In 1888 Fourth Avenue officially became known as Park Avenue. A drawing of Park Avenue from the 1870s shows substantial brownstone residences lining the side streets off Park Avenue in the Fifties and Forties.^ Most of the structures facing on Park Avenue itself appear to be one- or two-story carriage houses or commercial buildings. By 1885, the block between 53rd and 54th Streets on the west side of Park Avenue was completely built up with four- and five-story buildings. South of 53rd Street were located manufacturing buildings such as the Steinway Piano Factorv and the Schafer Brewery. By 1905 all this had changed. In conjunction with the reconstruction of Grand Central Terminal, the street was taken up again and new excavations were begun that took the full width of Park Avenue. The buildings on either side had to be propped up on steel "needle beams" to prevent their collapse. New double stacked tracks were constructed under grade. The nature of the new cleaner electric trains made it possible to rebuild Park Avenue solidly with no open wells. A generous planted mall was built down the center of the avenue, and park benches we
Lever House
Lever House
Park Avenue, Midtown Manhattan, New York City, New York, United States 390 Park Avenue, Midtown Manhattan Lever House, situated on the west side of Park Avenue between East 53rd Street and East 54th Street is a 24-story glass and stainless steel clad office building composed of a vertical slab rising above a horizontal base. Its construction in 1950-52 heralded the beginning of a new wave of American skyscraper construction and a new synthesis of modernist architectural ideals. Since the time of its completion, its crystalline forms and glazed curtain walls have attracted world attention. It has assumed a major role in the literature of modern architecture and has been wide ]y recognized as a key monument in the evolution of the International Style. Lever House also heralded the almost complete transformation of Park Avenue that took place in the years following 1952. The mile-long stretch, of Park Avenue from the Grand Central complex to Last 59th Street changed in a single decade from an avenue of traditional masonry apartment houses to one of .lass and steel office buildings. Lever House was the first New York real estate venture to take advantage of a zoning provision which permitted a building to rise with no setbacks provided that the building covered only 25 percent of the lot. As a result, Lever House broke the tradition of "shaped tower" skyscrapers which had prevailed since the 1910s. Lever House introduced many innovations into skyscraper design that were to be much imitated. The most obvious was the use of glass covering almost 100 percent of the visible facades, as well as an integrally designed window-washing mechanism to keep it clean. It also introduced the concept of opening a portion of the ground floor to public use and of providing an open courtyard at its base. This last feature was later to become, in the form of the open plaza, almost a standard component of New York office building development. Above the ground floor the building serves solely to house the offices of the Lever Brothers Company, an American manufacturer of household products whose desire for a New York headquarters of outstanding design - resulted in a major architectural statement. Lever Brothers Company The Lever Brothers Company traces its American origi ns to iSSS when Vi lliam Hesketh Lever (1851-1925), a British manufacturer of "Sun 1i gh t" scum , toured the The Site In 1815 the site of the present Lever House was part of a farm owned by Charles McEvers, whose house stood on the western end of his property near Fifth Avenue.-^ His tract stretched from the imaginary line of Fifth Avenue to that of Fourth Avenue (later Park Avenue). The history of Fourth Avenue, however, really begins with the advent of the railroads. In 1834 the New York and Harlem railroad first carried passengers along newly laid tracks down the center of Fourth Avenue from 42nd Street to 96th Street. By 1848 the New Haven Railroad entered Manhattan along Fourth Avenue. Due to increased noise, smoke, and danger of fire and injury, the city government directed the railroads to depress the tracks along the avenue. As railroad traffic increased, more space was needed to lay additional tracks. By 1881 Fourth Avenue was widened to .140 feet. The trains ran in an open cut below grade south of 56th Street. On either side of the depressed tracks were 27-foot wide roadways and 15-foot wide sidewalks. North of 56th Street the tracks were partially covered over with a "beam tunnel." — consisting of raised planted malls running down the center of the boulevard. Within these planted malls open wells provided light and ventilation to the tracks below. The overall effect of the landscaped "beam tunnels" was widely admired,although the smoke and noise must have poured out from the open wells. In 1888 Fourth Avenue officially became known as Park Avenue. A drawing of Park Avenue from the 1870s shows substantial brownstone residences lining the side streets off Park Avenue in the Fifties and Forties.^ Most of the structures facing on Park Avenue itself appear to be one- or two-story carriage houses or commercial buildings. By 1885, the block between 53rd and 54th Streets on the west side of Park Avenue was completely built up with four- and five-story buildings. South of 53rd Street were located manufacturing buildings such as the Steinway Piano Factorv and the Schafer Brewery. By 1905 all this had changed. In conjunction with the reconstruction of Grand Central Terminal, the street was taken up again and new excavations were begun that took the full width of Park Avenue. The buildings on either side had to be propped up on steel "needle beams" to prevent their collapse. New double stacked tracks were constructed under grade. The nature of the new cleaner electric trains made it possible to rebuild Park Avenue solidly with no open wells. A generous planted mall was built down the center of the avenue

glass shades replacements
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