MIDWEST SCHOOL FURNITURE. MIDWEST SCHOOL

Midwest school furniture. Modern designer furniture

Midwest School Furniture


midwest school furniture
    midwest school
  • (Midwest Schools) Midwest School is a public school in the Natrona County School District in Midwest, Wyoming. It is the only school in the district that serves students in preschool through 12th grade.
    furniture
  • A person's habitual attitude, outlook, and way of thinking
  • Furniture is the mass noun for the movable objects ('mobile' in Latin languages) intended to support various human activities such as seating and sleeping in beds, to hold objects at a convenient height for work using horizontal surfaces above the ground, or to store things.
  • Small accessories or fittings for a particular use or piece of equipment
  • furnishings that make a room or other area ready for occupancy; "they had too much furniture for the small apartment"; "there was only one piece of furniture in the room"
  • Furniture + 2 is the most recent EP released by American post-hardcore band Fugazi. It was recorded in January and February 2001, the same time that the band was recording their last album, The Argument, and released in October 2001 on 7" and on CD.
  • Large movable equipment, such as tables and chairs, used to make a house, office, or other space suitable for living or working
midwest school furniture - Midwest Folding
Midwest Folding Products Carpet Platform 3'x6'x24" High
Midwest Folding Products Carpet Platform 3'x6'x24" High
Portable platform with carpet deck surface is 3'x6'x24''H. All have automatic closed latch for safer operation. Durable 3/4'' thick plywood tops are edged with 16ga. formed steel channels. Bolted design for security. Leg assemblies are 1.05'' diam. 14ga. steel tubing for vertical, loadbearing members and 1'' diam. 16ga. steel for horizontal and intermediate members. Top surfaces are 3/4'' thick. Heavyduty platforms link together to create the size stage you need. Legs fold for easy transport and storage on platform caddy. Platforms hold 200 lbs. per sq. foot. Platforms are fully assembled. 3624C

78% (12)
Stockholm Street
Stockholm Street
Stockholm Street Historic District, Ridgewood, Queens, New York City, New York, United States SUMMARY The Stockholm Street Historic District, located in the western part of Ridgewood, Queens, is a one-block ensemble of brick rowhouses representing one of the most intact, harmonious, and architecturally-distinguished enclaves of working-class dwellings built in New York City during the early twentieth century. The historic district consists of thirty-six houses, one former stable, and two garages, lining both sides of a brick-paved street. Thirty-five of the houses were constructed between 1907 and 1910, when Ridgewood was being developed by German-Americans and immigrants from Germany. The rows, which feature full-width wooden porches with columns, projecting bays, uninterrupted cornice lines, and bricks produced by the Kreischer Brick Manufacturing Company of Staten Island, were designed by the architectural firm Louis Berger & Company and built by Joseph Weiss & Company. In addition, the historic district has Ridgewood's only-extant brick street pavement. The district retains a high level of integrity and the ambience that has distinguished it since the early twentieth century. History of Ridgewood, Queens Located in western Queens County, Ridgewood shares much of its history and character with the adjacent neighborhood of Bushwick, Brooklyn. Both areas were inhabited by the Mespachtes Indians prior to being settled by Europeans. Bushwick was one of the original six towns of Brooklyn, while Ridgewood was part of Newtown, one of the original three towns of Queens County. In 1854, Bushwick became part of the City of Brooklyn, which consolidated with four other counties, including Queens County, to form the City of New York in 1898. During the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, farms in Bushwick and Ridgewood were tilled by Dutch and British families, who grew lettuce, corn, potatoes, cauliflower, and a variety of fruits for urban markets in Brooklyn and Manhattan. The only-known Dutch farmhouse surviving in Ridgewood is the Adrian and Ann Wyckoff Onderdonk House, a designated New York City Landmark. Built in the last quarter of the eighteenth century, the house was restored in 1980-82. The discovery of pure ground water in Bushwick in the mid-nineteenth century spurred the construction of several breweries, most of which were owned by German immigrants, whose work force included many other Germans. Development in Bushwick was further propelled by improvements in transportation. The Myrtle Avenue horsecar line was extended east to Broadway in 1855, while the elevated rapid transit line reached Broadway in 1879. By 1880, at least eleven breweries, including Rheingold and Schaefer, were operating within a fourteen block area in western Bushwick, known as "brewer's row,"3 and other industrious German immigrants opened factories and knitting mills in the area. Tenements and small row houses were built to house the workers and their families.4 Located to the east of Bushwick, Ridgewood remained largely rural until after the consolidation of the City of New York in 1898, just as the last vacant land in Bushwick was being developed. A number of picnic grounds, amusement parks, and racetracks had already opened amidst Ridgewood's fields and farming villages following the arrival in 1888 of the elevated rapid transit line, which terminated at Wyckoff Avenue along the Brooklyn/Queens border, and the extension of the electrified trolley from Bushwick to Fresh Pond Road in Ridgewood in 1894.5 By the turn of the century, Bushwick's builders began purchasing Ridgewood's farms, parks, and racetracks. Over the next two decades they constructed tenements and small row houses similar to those they had built for the German immigrant workers and their families in Bushwick. From the turn of the century to World War I, over 5,000 structures were built in Ridgewood.7 The developers built wood-frame houses until 1905, when building codes took effect requiring masonry construction. All subsequent construction in Bushwick and Ridgewood, including the Stockholm Street Historic District, was masonry.8 Most of the builders hired the architectural firm Louis Berger & Co. to design their rows, which were faced largely with bricks produced by the Kreischer Brick Manufacturing Company. Thus, many of Ridgewood's buildings share similar designs, brickwork, and ornamentation. Building stopped during World War I, resuming at a slower pace following the war and continuing until the last Ridgewood farms were developed in the late 1930s. During this period, a wider variety of housing was built, including new-law tenements and attached and semi-detached single- and multi-family houses. Germans in New York City, Bushwick, and Ridgewood From its founding in 1626 by Peter Minuit, a native of the German town of Wesel am Rhein, New York City has had a significant German population. During the 1820s, the first German
Ultra Mod Library Furniture
Ultra Mod Library Furniture
Cofrin Library, University of Wisconsin-Green Bay: Don't get me wrong, the library has plenty of nice, new and comfy furniture. But tucked away here and there you'll find some "old school" furniture. This time, it's classic modern furniture! I love the purple chairs against the screaming green background. Reminds me of Eames-style chairs. Photo edited w/ CameraBag desktop app.

midwest school furniture
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