KEYSTONE COLLECTION FURNITURE. COLLECTION FURNITURE

KEYSTONE COLLECTION FURNITURE. LABORATORY FURNITURE IRELAND

Keystone Collection Furniture


keystone collection furniture
    collection
  • several things grouped together or considered as a whole
  • a publication containing a variety of works
  • The action or process of collecting someone or something
  • A regular removal of mail for dispatch or of trash for disposal
  • An instance of collecting money in a church service or for a charitable cause
  • solicitation: request for a sum of money; "an appeal to raise money for starving children"
    furniture
  • A person's habitual attitude, outlook, and way of thinking
  • Small accessories or fittings for a particular use or piece of equipment
  • Furniture is the mass noun for the movable objects ('mobile' in Latin languages) intended to support various human activities such as seating and sleeping in beds, to hold objects at a convenient height for work using horizontal surfaces above the ground, or to store things.
  • furnishings that make a room or other area ready for occupancy; "they had too much furniture for the small apartment"; "there was only one piece of furniture in the room"
  • Furniture + 2 is the most recent EP released by American post-hardcore band Fugazi. It was recorded in January and February 2001, the same time that the band was recording their last album, The Argument, and released in October 2001 on 7" and on CD.
  • Large movable equipment, such as tables and chairs, used to make a house, office, or other space suitable for living or working
    keystone
  • Keystone is the twenty-fifth album by trumpeter Dave Douglas. It was released on the Greenleaf label in 2005 and features performances by Douglas, Jamie Saft, DJ Olive, Gene Lake, Marcus Strickland, and Brad Jones.
  • A central stone at the summit of an arch, locking the whole together
  • The central principle or part of a policy, system, etc., on which all else depends
  • anchor: a central cohesive source of support and stability; "faith is his anchor"; "the keystone of campaign reform was the ban on soft money"; "he is the linchpin of this firm"
  • the central building block at the top of an arch or vault

Collectors Club
Collectors Club
Murray Hill, Manhattan This charming building, now the home of the Collectors Club, was constructed in 1901-02 as the residence of Thomas Benedict Clarke in the fashionable Murray Hill section of New York. An especially notable example of neo-Georgian architecture, it was designed by the firm of McKim, Mead & White, and is one of their outstanding residential designs in New York City. Murray Hill had begun to be developed with residences in the mid-19th century. The area took its name from the country estate of Robert and. Mary Murray. According to legend, during the Revolutionary War, Mary Murray had detained General Howe at the family house on their country estate, thus allowing , George Washington to escape further northward. Following the opening of Lexington and Fourth Avenues through the area in 1848, rows of brownstone residences were quickly built along the side streets. Socially prominent and wealthy residents, such as A.T. Stewart and J.P. Morgan, moved into the area, concentrating their residences along Fifth and Madison Avenues. Although by the turn of the century commercial development was beginning to encroach upon Fifth Avenue, the streets to the east of Madison still remained fashionable, due in large part to the efforts of J.P. Morgan. Consequently in 1901 Thomas B. Clarke purchased a brownstone rowhouse on East 35th Street with the intention of creating a new residence suitable for housing his extensive art collection. Thomas Benedict Clarke (1848-1931) was a prominent New York City art collector, dealer, and decorator. Although he began his career as a merchant and banker, his first love was art. In 1892 he became a dealer, opening his "art house" at 4 East 34th Street. He collected and sold art in a number of areas, including 17th and 18th-century English furniture, Chinese porcelain, and European antiques. He was the first major collector in the United States to concentrate on American painting, especially works by late 19th-century artists and Hudson River painters. This collection was sold at auction in 1899. While reviewing the furniture and antiques in Clarke's collection prior to an auction in 1925, the noted art critic Royal Cortissoz described "the signs every where discernible of an exacting taste and a thoroughgoing knowledge of the subject" and praised the collection as having "on it the bloom of superfine quality, of things chosen with pondered judgment. " Throughout his collecting career Clarke remained devoted to art continued to add to his collection of early American portraits. With over 170 examples at the time of his death, it was "pronounced the finest in the world in private ownership." Clarke also served as president of the New York School of Applied Design for nine years, and endowed an annual composition prize at the National Academy of Design. He design his new residence as a suitable showcase for his varied collections, Clarke turned to the prestigious firm of McKim, Mead & White. By 1901 McKim, Mead & White was the most prominent architectural firm in the United States. Founded in 1879 by Charles Pollen McKim (1847-1909), William Rutherford Mead (1840-1928), and Stanford White (1853-1906), the firm began to achieve a national reputation with its designs for the Henry Villard Houses (1882-86), a designated New York City Landmark, and the Boston Public Library (1887-95). This reputation was consolidated and expanded by the World's Columbian Exhibition of 1893 in Chicago, which set a trend for monumental neo-classical architecture. Through the skill of its members and the breadth of its resources, the firm was able to produce a vast number of designs in a variety of classical styles for many types of buildings, ranging from residences to monumental public edifices. The firm can be credited with popularizing classical stylistic modes inspired by English and colonial American precedents. Following the American Centennial of 1876 which renewed interest in colonial antecedents, McKim, Mead & White began to closely study the forms of colonial architecture. Throughout the 1880s the partners utilized these forms, particularly in their designs for suburban and country houses. However, they also utilized the more urbane forms of colonial Georgian architecture, beginning with a group of town houses on Commonwealth Avenue in Boston. They continued this trend for urban town houses, like that of Thomas B. Clarke, well into the 20th century. The design of Clarke's house has long been attributed to Stanford White, a personal friend of Clarke with many of the same interests. White achieved fame even greater than that of the firm, not only for his prolific work in residential design, but also because of the public scandal which surrounded his murder in 1906. While Wiite had ambitions to be a painter, he joined the architectural firm of Gambrill & Richardson at the age of 19 in 1872. He stayed with Richardson
Collectors Club
Collectors Club
22 East 35th Street, Thomas and Fanny Clarke House, Murray Hill, Manhattan, New York City, New York, United States This charming building, now the heme of the Collectors Club, was constructed in 1901-02 as the residence of Thanes Benedict Clarke in the fashionable Murray Hill section of New York. An especially notable example of neo-Georgian architecture, it was designed by the firm of McKim, Mead & White, and is one of their outstanding residential designs in New York City. Murray Hill had begun to be developed with residences in the mid-19th century. The area took its name from the country estate of Robert and. Mary Murray. According to legend, during the Revolutionary War, Mary Murray had detained General Howe at the family house on their country estate, thus allowing , George Washington to escape further northward. Following the opening of Lexington and Fourth Avenues through the area in 1848, rows of brownstone residences were quickly built along the side streets. Socially prominent and wealthy residents, such as A.T. Stewart and J.P. Morgan, moved into the area, concentrating their residences along Fifth and Madison Avenues. Although by the turn of the century commercial development was beginning to encroach upon Fifth Avenue, the streets to the east of Madison still remained fashionable, due in large part to the efforts of J.P. Morgan. Consequently in 1901 Thomas B. Clarke purchased a brownstone rowhouse on East 35th Street with the intention of creating a new residence suitable for housing his extensive art collection. Thomas Benedict Clarke (1848-1931) was a prominent New York City art collector, dealer, and decorator. Although he began his career as a merchant and banker, his first love was art. In 1892 he became a dealer, opening his "art house" at 4 East 34th Street. He collected and sold art in a number of areas, including 17th and 18th-century English furniture, Chinese porcelain, and European antiques. He was the first major collector in the United States to concentrate on American painting, especially works by late 19th-century artists and Hudson River painters. This collection was sold at auction in 1899. While reviewing the furniture and antiques in Clarke's collection prior to an auction in 1925, the noted art critic Royal Cortissoz described "the signs every where discernible of an exacting taste and a thoroughgoing knowledge of the subject" and praised the collection as having "on it the bloom of superfine quality, of things chosen with pondered judgment. " Throughout his collecting career Clarke remained devoted to ar continued to add to his collection of early American portraits. With over 170 examples at the time of his death, it was "pronounced the finest in the world in private ownership." Clarke also served as president of the New York School of Applied Design for nine years, and endowed an annual composition prize at the National Academy of Design. He design his new residence as a suitable showcase for his varied collections, Clarke turned to the prestigious firm of McKim, Mead & White. By 1901 McKim, Mead & White was the most prominent architectural firm in the United States. Founded in 1879 by Charles Pollen McKim (1847-1909), William Rutherford Mead (1840-1928), and Stanford White (1853-1906), the firm began to achieve a national reputation with its designs for the Henry Villard Houses (1882-86), a designated New York City Landmark, and the Boston Public Library (1887-95). This reputation was consolidated and expanded by the World's Columbian Exhibition of 1893 in Chicago, which set a trend for monumental neo-classical architecture. Through the skill of its members and the breadth of its resources, the firm was able to produce a vast number of designs in a variety of classical styles for many types of buildings, ranging from residences to monumental public edifices. The firm can be credited with popularizing classical stylistic modes inspired by English and colonial American precedents. Following the American Centennial of 1876 which renewed interest in colonial antecedents, McKim, Mead & White began to closely study the forms of colonial architecture. Throughout the 1880s the partners utilized these forms, particularly in their designs for suburban and country houses. However, they also utilized the more urbane forms of colonial Georgian architecture, beginning with a group of town houses on Ccmicnwealth Avenue in Boston. They continued this trend for urban town houses, like that of Thoras B. Clarke, well into the 20th century. The design of Clarke's house has long been attributed to Stanford White, a personal friend of Clarke with many of the same interests. White achieved fame tven greater than that of the firm, not only for his prolific work in residential design, but also because of the public scandal which surrounded his murder in 1906. While Wiite had ambitions to be a painter, he joined the architectu

keystone collection furniture
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