CAMPAIGN FURNITURE : CAMPAIGN

Campaign furniture : Church youth room furniture.

Campaign Furniture


campaign furniture
    campaign furniture
  • Campaign furniture is a type of furniture that was made for travel. Much of it was made for military campaigns and includes folding chairs and chests that could be easily unscrewed and packed.
  • Foldable or collapsable furniture pieces with flat surfaces that are readily assembled. Typical of the European (especially English) colonial periods.
  • Portable furniture that's folding or collapsible, or made of flat components that can be assembled or disassembled. Initiated for military use and usually features handles, it is most associated with colonialism.
campaign furniture - British Campaign
British Campaign Furniture: Elegance Under Canvas, 1740-1914
British Campaign Furniture: Elegance Under Canvas, 1740-1914
The first-ever book on the suites of travelling furniture used by British soldiers over one-and-a-half centuries. For the travelling British soldier, campaign furniture - chairs, desks, and other items, brought the comfort and civility of home to life under canvas. Made to be carried on the march and assembled on site, campaign furniture reached an aesthetic apex in 18th- and 19th-century England.

"The first axiom for camp is... do not make yourself uncomfortable for want of things to which you are accustomed," advised The Complete Indian Housekeeper and Cook in 1890 to high-born Brits living in India, most of which England had by that point colonized through a succession of wars, or military "campaigns," throughout the 18th and 19th centuries. This impeccably curated, insightfully narrated, and richly illustrated volume proves that the homesick subjects of the Raj took such advice deeply to heart. It showcases nearly 200 years of furniture designed expressly to approximate all the refinement of a proper British household inside the canvas tents of ranking officers afar, but also to break down and fold up fast for easy, compact transport (hence campaign furniture's other appellation, "knock-down" furniture). Masterfully put together by independent curator Brawer, previously a researcher in the Indian and Southeast Asian departments of London's venerable Victoria and Albert Museum, this handsome volume succeeds on two levels: it amply highlights the stylistic elegance and technical ingenuity of this kind of furniture--a bureau that becomes a bed when its drawers are removed; a lady's bidet that folds into a leather case; or a dining table seating 20 that fits inside a 10-inch-deep box--while putting it (often quite wryly) in the historical context of an expatriate society that sought to re-create Britain wherever it went and had little or no interest in adapting to or learning about the customs or designs of the people it conquered (and essentially enslaved). Throughout, Brawer includes excerpts from a fascinating array of letters, journals, and other documents of the period, and an excellent pictorial directory of the furniture's craftsmen and manufacturers helps make this impressive tome invaluable for collectors, design historians, Anglophiles, and Merchant-Ivory set designers alike. --Timothy Murphy

87% (10)
Armoire Storage
Armoire Storage
In this commission the client had an armoire which she wanted retrofitted to store plates, flatware, and linens. The inside depth of the piece was 18 3/4", which made it a bit too small to function as a space for hanging coats or other clothing. Recently married and in a new home, she and her husband needed a way to make better use of it. Any solution would need to compliment the clean, contemporary look of the armoire and be easily removed. (any one who has ever had to deal with my Saga of the Two Armoires, or helped me move them, is now free to chuckle) My first thoughts about a solution landed on something like campaign chests or barrister bookcases. Modular yet attractive boxes which can be moved without removing their contents. the last requirement was unnecessary and, since they would contain dinnerware, unwise. I have always liked campaign furniture and have proposed a few projects which featured their utility, but none were ever built. Like the armoire, the boxes are made of cherry. The cabinet also has some exotic accent wood which I was unable to identify. I chose bubinga for the pulls and side handles, and that was a pretty close match. The backs are solid 1/2" cherry, but it matches the existing back so well that it almost looks as if the boxes are open. The drawers have thick, rounded fronts to play off of the gently rounded framing of the cabinet doors and carcase. The top two drawers are subdivided for flatware and other utensils. For the first time I used "self-closing" slides on the drawers. Rather than slamming closed, the last few inches of the slide have a mechanical cushion which soften the action of the slide and then holds the drawer in place. I was pleased, the clients were pleased, and they were no harder and only a bit more expensive than regular slides. My preference is to make and use wood slides, but the 29" width of these drawers meant that they would be prone to racking and jamming, so their use was excluded here. Each box is 32" wide, 17" deep, and 19" high. I left slight gaps between the boxes by putting round feet on their bottoms which mate with slightly larger holes in the top of the box below. The small gap becomes a place for storing place mats or the like. I also did purposely left some space between the top of the highest box and the existing shelf so that an additional storage surface is created.
Advertisement Campaign?
Advertisement Campaign?
Fabiana and I are working on a new studio project and, even if still in the very early stages, we are quite excited by it. This shot is one of those who kick-started few of the ideas behind, but I have to admit that I will be naughty enough not to reveal many things... I like working with Fabiana because we form a very close team and brainstorming brings very interesting elements together almost seamless. The other day we were out eating something and we were discussing how we can leave a footprint in the photography world; believe it or not we want to do it in a couple of years. We do not want to become two of the many photographers that hunt their day to day photo shoots. I know that many of you are thinking "Yeah, ok, like everyone else in the world!" and I cannot disagree, but the difference between those who make it and those who do not is something the first did, so we will do something! A component of the plan we will set in place was kick-started by this photo. Still in studio, on the day of the session, Suzana saw this photo just downloaded on my computer and she said "It almost seems a Prada Advertisement Campaign!". Initially I was flattered by the comment, but only later I did realize something I never thought before (consciously at least): Advertisement is a world where a good photo with a good idea can make the difference. No, I am sorry I am not going to tell you what we will do in details, also because the idea is still in its initial, ectoplasmic form. We are going to create some "Virtual" advertising campaigns, in order to practice with some ideas and to train our gaze on some particular issues. Stay tuned!

campaign furniture
campaign furniture
Campaign Files, Ivory 29" - Nautical Furniture - Nautical Decor Solid Brass Home Decoration - Executive Promotional Gift
Filing cabinets are essentially boring entities. Choice-wise there's not much out there. Grandeur and elegance is not associated with the domain of organization. Stashing your files in a Hermes backpack or a vintage Louis Vuitton trunk, while certainly fancy, is not overly accessible. Compare these with our two-drawer Campaign Files. Ready to travel. Rolls where needed at the push of a finger. Laden with written treasures, documents, papers of content... Brass bound, wood, this cabinet is made to be handed down through generations.

Comments