SMALL SCALE BEDROOM FURNITURE - SMALL SCALE

Small scale bedroom furniture - American furniture liquidation center

Small Scale Bedroom Furniture


small scale bedroom furniture
    bedroom furniture
  • Furniture sets that are placed in your bedroom such as bed, dresser, chest of drawers and nightstand. Some bedroom collections even come with an armoire, chiffonier or storage chest. Depending on your preference, you may choose contemporary, traditional or transitional styled bedrooms.
  • furniture intended for use in a bedroom
    small scale
  • The word 'Small' refers to the fraction 'Units on map / Units on earth' (1/250,000). Implies a map or photo covering a large area but showing a small amount of detail.
  • minor: limited in size or scope; "a small business"; "a newspaper with a modest circulation"; "small-scale plans"; "a pocket-size country"
  • created or drawn on a small scale; "small-scale maps"; "a small-scale model"
  • Of limited size or extent
small scale bedroom furniture - Barbie Glam
Barbie Glam Refrigerator
Barbie Glam Refrigerator
Kids will love decorating their Barbie My House with this cute refrigerator set! Set comes with furnishings and accessories for a contemporary room environment. It includes a pink refrigerator with a large bottom freezer drawer and two upper opening doors. Fridge is approx. 9.5 inches tall and 4 inches wide. Set also includes a 1.5 inch, brown, puppy dog in a sitting position. Set includes a turkey on a platter, a yellow egg container, a carton of milk, a large water bottle, a mustard bottle, a pie, an ice pops container, and lots more pretend food! Set is modular and fits within the Barbie My House. Collect the other sets: the Glam Daybed or the Glam Bathtub set. Other sets sold separately. Age 3+

84% (10)
Joseph Pulitzer Mansion - 7-11 East 73rd Street
Joseph Pulitzer Mansion - 7-11 East 73rd Street
Of the many prominent and influential clients of Stanford White, there probably was not anyone more difficult to work with than publisher Joseph Pulitzer. Afte rhis house and part of his art collection at 10 East 55th Street burned in 1900, Pulitzer asked White to design a frieproof house on a 74 by 100 ft plot on East 73rd Street. The owner of both the New York World and the St. Louis Dispatcher was by this time almost completely blind ; therefore, he required White to make scale models of his architectural proposals so that he could run his hands over them. Pulitzer asked for a simple house with "no ballroom, no music room, or picture gallery under any disguise...no French rooms, designed or decorated to require Frnech furniture.. I want an American home for comfort an duse and not for show or entertainment." Following these instructions, White submitted a model of asimple Florentine palazzo to the newspaperman. This scheme was summarily rejected byt he client, as were several to follows. White finally realized that Pulitzer was rejecting his proposals because the models he presented lacked the ornamental relief necessary for him to tactilely distinguish the design. White's next offering was based on the facade of the Venetian Palazzo Persaro and was wedded tot he Grand Canal entrance of the Palazzo Rezzonico. This model, with its forest of engaged Doric, Ionic, and Corinthian columns, had the proper amount of movement and spatial articulation and was immediately approved by Pultizer. Probably as a result of White's intervention, the house ended up having both a French salon and a music room. The simple American house that Pulitzer originally requested was now brimming over with fine French furniture. As his eyesight failed, the publisher's hearing became more acute and he became almost phobic about noise. He insisted that his personal rooms in the new house be effectively soundproofed. The circular breakfast room, where he ate most o fhis meals, wa splaced in the center of the house, as far as possible from outside noises. A sealed skylight above a trellised dome lighted the area, and transparent, hollow, glass blocks filled the room's only window. Pulitzer's bedroom needed to be soundproofed as well, and a Harvard acoustics expert was called in to acomplished this. The walls were stuffed with insulation, the windows were tripled glazed, and the floor was putt on ball bearings to prevent any vibration. When all was complete, White shut himself inside and had the workmen outside shout and pund on the walls. With no sounds penetrating, the architect was convinced the room was acoustically perfect. Unfortunately, after spending a single night in the room, Pultizer announced that it was a failure, complaining of hearing the sounds of a pump buried far beneath the house, and accused White of trying to drive him mad. The architect's partner, William Rutherford Mead, jumped tp his defense, saying, "Nerves are his trouble and that is not part of an architect's business to supply the client with a proper set of nerves." In 1904, Pultizer hired the firm Foster, Gade & Graham to build a new bedroom in a one-story annex located at the rear of the house, but after spending one night in it, the cranky publisher again angrily declared that he could still hear street noises and early-morning factory whistles. White came to the rescue this time by stretching thousands of silk threads across the chimney flue opening. At last, Pultizer got a decent night's sleep. The house, finished in 1903, had one of the most unusual residential floor plans in the city. Three sets of glazed, wrought iron entrance doors led to a wide transverse hall with a monumental staircase. Off this hall, a reception room and a smaller hall led to the breakfast room and dining room. Under the staircase, a door led to the music room and to Pulitzer's study with an adjoining secretary's office. On the second floor, a small sitting room was located at the top of the staircase and a 50 ft long ballroom with five large French doors ran along the front of the house. The owner's unsuccessful first bedroom, as well as three other bedrooms, were on this floor as well. The house cost Pulitzer $369,000, exclusive of land and artwork (2009 USD $8698187.17 ) Pulitzer spent only two or three months a year in his new house; he also owned homes in Bar Harbor, Maine, and Jekyll Island, Georgia (SUSPICIOUS) as well as a villa on the Riviera. In his later years, the puublisher spent the majority of his time cruising on his 269 ft motor yacht, Liberty. From this boat, by telegraph, he kept firm control over his publishing empire. Joseph Pulitzer wwa sonce described by Lord Northcliffe as "the blind statesman-editor who, from his yacht in the Mediterranean, could see more than politicians in London or Washington or financiers in Wall Street." His professional life was devoted to informing and then molding public opinion
Miniature Young Solitary Practitioner Witch Altar ~ 1:12th Scale
Miniature Young Solitary Practitioner Witch Altar ~ 1:12th Scale
“A Little Tale”… Everyone, especially big metropolitan city dwellers, think that living in a small town is idyllic. They believe it must be wonderful knowing all your neighbors, visiting them, socializing with them, knowing the local law enforcement, the teachers, coaching soccer, in walking distance of the Post Office, and feeling safe. Well, nothing could be farther from the truth. I know because I live in a small town. My family has lived here for generations and generations before me. No one ever thinks of living anywhere else. Most small towns think small. Why? Well, it may be because the small town inhabitants stay in their small town, isolated, and never learn or experience anything new from “the outside world”. So, they hold the same beliefs as their parents did and their grandparents. Nothing ever changes and they like it that way. Plus, everyone does not get along as one would imagine in a small town. It is not like living in a Thomas Kincaid painting. Everyone knows all your business and there are no secrets. Plus, once you are pegged a certain way, that is how people think of you your entire life. So, if the town sees you as a nerd, well, you will always be the town nerd. They do not question anything and have no desire to learn more or challenge their beliefs. They are content to be the same. Well, not me. I don’t belong here and I can’t figure out how I ended up being born here. I plan to get out. But, until then, I am learning all I can and expanding what I believe. We have a library, if you can call it that, but, it is really a joke. It is attached to Ed’s gas station over on Elm Road by the big oak and there are probably only 150 or so books in it. And, as far as computers go, I think three people in the whole town own one and they are really really old. If anyone knew what I was studying, well, I shudder to think. Ever since I was a little girl, I knew I was different and I believed in different things. I am fascinated by the moon and nature. I always felt myself being drawn to witchcraft. So, since there are no witches in this small town and I don’t want anybody to know or even suspect, last summer, I went to one of the nearest big cities and they had a Barnes and Noble bookstore. Boy, I could not believe all the books, ideas, concepts, art, and music. And, there were so many books on witchcraft, it took me hours to pick the right one so I could learn it and practice it on my own until I got out of my town. I have to study and practice in secret. It’s funny; no one pays attention to you until you have a secret. It is as if they can smell it on you. Then, all of a sudden, everyone’s eyes are on your every move. Nobody really paid much attention to me until I came back from the city that summer. Then, everyone seemed to be curious about me. Maybe I smelled to them like a person from “the outside world”. I live with my Dad. My Mom died years ago and my Dad works long hours in his pizza parlor. That is good for me because I am home alone a lot and I can study my craft and practice it. I was able to get some items for my altar the second time I went to the big city. When my Dad’s at work, I set up my altar with what I have acquired so far and practice my spell work. My altar, which is really a table that I painted and decorated myself, has really beautiful things on it. I made sure to buy really nice things, but, it does not have all the items a real witch has. But, nonetheless, it is a good one. I consecrated it and it I love it. It is set up and hidden in the back of my closet in my bedroom. I study the moon, the seasons, and I, quietly to myself, observe the Sabbaths. I have my book on witchcraft practically memorized, which makes me think the Goddess is proud of me. I pray to her to help me get out of this town soon and I think I will. I have a new confidence about me. Finally, I am evolving into who I really am. And, when I leave this place, I will be able to practice my religion freely and openly away from spying eyes and judgmental people. ~ Marsha J. West, Author Note: This is my original “A Little Tale”. It is my personal creative property and is not to be stolen, copied or reprinted in any medium without prior approval from me. Sold.

small scale bedroom furniture
small scale bedroom furniture
Storage Cube Ottoman in Natural
39-5(Natural) This beautifully handcrafted ottoman brings style and class to any room. Its thick foam padding is perfect for giving the legs a rest while sitting in your favorite chair. The top opens for storage of magazines or various other items. Spot clean only. Features: -100pct polyester fabric -Polyurethane dacron foam -Opening top for storage -Overall Dimensions:16'' H x 19'' W x 19'' D -Storage Dimensions: 16'' H x 16'' W x 9.5'' D Cleaning Code -S To prevent overall soil, frequent vacuuming or light brushing to remove dust and grime is recommended. Spot clean using a mild water-free solvent or dry cleaning product. Clean only in a well ventilated room and avoid any product containing carbon tetrachloride which is highly toxic. Pretest small area before proceeding. Cleaning by a professional furniture cleaning service only is recommended. Please note: This item can not be cancelled after 48 hours of purchase due to the custom nature of the product.

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