FRENCH FURNITURE IN LOS ANGELES - FRENCH FURNITURE IN

French Furniture In Los Angeles - Discount Bedroom Furniture Atlanta - Wicker Furniture Stores.

French Furniture In Los Angeles


french furniture in los angeles
    french furniture
  • French furniture comprises both the most sophisticated furniture made in Paris for king and court, aristocrats and rich upper bourgeoisie, on the one hand, and French provincial furniture made in the provincial cities and towns many of which, like Lyon and Liege, retained cultural identities
    los angeles
  • A city on the Pacific coast of southern California; pop. 3,694,820. It is a major center of industry, filmmaking, and television
  • a city in southern California; motion picture capital of the world; most populous city of California and second largest in the United States
  • Los Angeles is the capital of the province of Biobio, in the municipality of the same name, in Region VIII (the Biobio region), in the center-south of Chile. It is located between the Laja and Biobio rivers. The population is 123,445 inhabitants (census 2002).
  • Los Angeles Union Station (or LAUS) is a major passenger rail terminal and transit station in Los Angeles, California.
french furniture in los angeles - French Furniture
French Furniture and Gilt Bronzes: Baroque and Regence, Catalogue of the J. Paul Getty Museum Collection
French Furniture and Gilt Bronzes: Baroque and Regence, Catalogue of the J. Paul Getty Museum Collection
The exceptional collection of French decorative arts in the J. Paul Getty Museum contains more than four hundred objects, most of them dating from the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. This gorgeously illustrated volume brings together forty-four objects from the Baroque and Regence periods, roughly corresponding to the reign of Louis XIV and the years immediately following his death in 1715. The selection includes richly veneered cabinets, commodes, and desks; carved tables and chairs; and gilt-bronze light fixtures and firedogs that exemplify the superior craftsmanship and elaborate design characteristic of the Baroque style.
Each object is described and analyzed in terms of its style, use, provenance and published history, as well as its construction and alterations, materials, and conservation. With its painstaking attention to detail, this sumptuous volume is the definitive catalogue of the J. Paul Getty Museum's collection of French Baroque furniture and will be of interest to scholars, conservators, and all students of the French decorative arts.

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Chicago Theatre
Chicago Theatre
175 N State St Chicago, Illinois The grandeur of The Chicago Theatre often leaves its visitors breathless. The elegant lobby, majestic staircase and beautiful auditorium complete with murals above the stage and on the ceiling, are components of an amazing building called "the Wonder Theatre of the World" when it opened on October 26, 1921. The Chicago Theatre was the first large, lavish movie palace in America and was the prototype for all others. This beautiful movie palace was constructed for $4 million by theatre owners Barney and Abe Balaban and Sam and Morris Katz and designed by Cornelius and George Rapp. It was the flagship of the Balaban and Katz theatre chain. Built in French Baroque style, The Chicago Theatre's exterior features a miniature replica of Paris' Arc de Triomphe, sculpted above its State Street marquee. Faced in a glazed, off-white terra cotta, the triumphal arch is sixty feet wide and six stories high. Within the arch is a grand window in which is set a large circular stained-glass panel bearing the coat-of-arms of the Balaban and Katz chain - two horses holding ribbons of 35-mm film in their mouths. The grand lobby, modeled after the Royal Chapel at Versailles, is five stories high and surrounded by gallery promenades at the mezzanine and balcony levels. The grand staircase is patterned after that of the Paris Opera House and ascends to the various levels of the Great Balcony. The 3,600 seat auditorium is seven stories high, more than one half of a city block wide, and nearly as long. The vertical sign "C-H-I-C-A-G-O," at nearly six stories high, is one of the few such signs in existence today. A symbol of State Street and Chicago, the sign and marquee are landmarks in themselves, as is the 29-rank Wurlitzer theatre pipe organ. Balaban and Katz spared no expense on the workmanship and materials for this miniature Versailles. Marshall Field's supplied the drapes, furniture and interior decoration. Victor Pearlman and Co. designed and built the crystal chandeliers and lavish bronze light fixtures with Steuben glass shades. The McNulty Brothers' master craftsmen produced the splendid plaster details and Northwestern Terra Cotta Company provided the tiles for the facade. The Chicago Theatre first opened its doors on October 26, 1921 with Norma Talmadge on screen in "The Sign on the Door." A 50-piece orchestra performed in the pit and Jesse Crawford played the mighty Wurlitzer pipe organ. After a "white glove inspection," a staff of 125 ushers welcomed guests who paid 25 cents until 1 p.m., 35 cents in the afternoon and 50 cents after 6 p.m. During its first 40 years, The Chicago Theatre presented the best in live and film entertainment, including John Phillip Sousa, Duke Ellington, Jack Benny, and Benny Goodman. The Chicago Theatre was redecorated in preparation for the 1933 Chicago World's Fair and "modernized" in the 1950s when stage shows, with few exceptions, were discontinued. In the 1970s, under the ownership of the Plitt Theatres, The Chicago Theatre was the victim of a complex web of social and economic factors causing business to sag. It became an ornate but obsolete movie house, closing on September 19, 1985. In 1986, Chicago Theatre Restoration Associates, with assistance from the City of Chicago, bought and saved the theatre from demolition and began a meticulous nine-month multi-million dollar restoration undertaken by Chicago architects Daniel P. Coffey & Associates, Ltd. and interior design consultants A.T. Heinsbergen & Co. of Los Angeles, interior design consultants. The Chicago Theatre reopened on September 10, 1986 with a gala performance by Frank Sinatra. Since that time, an array of the entertainment world's brightest stars and greatest productions have graced the stage, including Allman Brothers Band, Arcade Fire, Blues Traveler, Kelly Clarkson, Harry Connick Jr, Ellen DeGeneres, Aretha Franklin, Kathy Griffin, , Gipsy Kings, Indigo Girls, Alicia Keys, David Letterman, Lyle Lovett, Oasis, Dolly Parton, Prince, Diana Ross, Van Morrison, Widespread Panic and Robin Williams.
Olympic Theater
Olympic Theater
This theater opened in 1927 under the name Bard's Eighth Street Theater, In 1932 the theater was renamed Olympic Theater to commemorate Los Angeles hosting the Olympic Games that year. The theater itself appears in movies including "The Omega Man"(1971) starring Charlton Heston. It was closed in 1986 and the interior was used for storage and had been stripped back to its four walls and painted white, with the floor leveled In In 2007, the building was reopened as a shop for chandeliers and French rococo furniture.............After all that at least they kept the amazing Art Deco Sign

french furniture in los angeles
french furniture in los angeles
French furniture
This is a reproduction of a book published before 1923. This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process. We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections, have elected to bring it back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide. We appreciate your understanding of the imperfections in the preservation process, and hope you enjoy this valuable book.

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