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Affordable Awnings


affordable awnings
    affordable
  • Inexpensive; reasonably priced
  • low-cost: that you have the financial means for; "low-cost housing"
  • something that can be afforded
  • (affordability) The extent to which something is affordable, as measured by its cost relative to the amount that the purchaser is able to pay
    awnings
  • (awning) a canopy made of canvas to shelter people or things from rain or sun
  • An awning or overhang is a secondary covering attached to the exterior wall of a building. It is typically composed of canvas woven of acrylic, cotton or polyester yarn, or vinyl laminated to polyester fabric that is stretched tightly over a light structure of aluminium, iron or steel, possibly
  • A sheet of canvas or other material stretched on a frame and used to keep the sun or rain off a storefront, window, doorway, or deck
  • (awning) A rooflike cover, usually of canvas, extended over or before any place as a shelter from the sun, rain, or wind; That part of the poop deck which is continued forward beyond the bulkhead of the cabin

YMCA Building, 135th Street Branch
YMCA Building, 135th Street Branch
Harlem, Manhattan, New York City, United States The Young Men's Christian Association (YMCA) Building, 135th Street Branch, was constructed in 1931-32 according to plans prepared by the Architectural Bureau of the National Council of the YMCA and to the design and under the supervision of architect James C. Mackenzie, Jr. This branch was the successor to the "Colored Men's Branch" of the YMCA, located on West 53rd Street between 1901 and 1919, and the West 135th Street Branch YMCA, built in 1918-19 at No. 181, across the street from the later building. African-American YMCAs were the result of the YMCA's official policy of racial segregation, from the organization's beginnings in the United States in 1851 until 1946. Though excluded from white YMCAs, AAican-Americans were encouraged to form separate branches, which became autonomous community centers. The 135th Street Branch YMCA, partially funded by John D. Rockefeller, Jr., Julius Rosenwald, and the Phelps-Stokes Fund, was called at the time of its completion the largest such facility for African-American men and boys, as well as one of the best-equipped YMCA buildings, in the United States. Eleven stories and clad in brick with neo-Georgian style details, the YMCA is C-shaped in plan above the four-story base, has setbacks, and is dominated by a tower that continues to be a major presence on the Harlem skyline. In 1936, the name of the 135th Street Branch was officially changed to the Harlem Branch YMCA. It has served as one of Harlem's most important recreational and cultural centers, and has been a significant purveyor of safe and affordable accommodations. Over the years the "Y" has had associations with many notable figures in the Harlem and African-American communities. The facility is known today as the Harlem YMCA. The West 135th Street Branch YMCA. 1919-1932 As Harlem emerged as the heart of the African-American community in Manhattan in the early twentieth centuiy, most of the major African-American institutions relocated to Harlem. One, the Colored Branch of the Young Women's Christian Association (founded in 1905), moved from a location on 53 rd Street to West 132nd Street in 1913. A Joint Campaign Committee of the YMCA and YWCA, under Jesse Moorland (then international secretary of the YMCA Colored Men's Department), assisted in raising funds for new buildings for both groups. Henry C. Parker, of the noted African-American real estate firm of Nail & Parker,"* was chairman of the committee to select a property in Harlem for the Colored Men's Branch of the YMCA. A lot at 181 West 135th Street was purchased in 1916, and a six-story YMCA building, the West 135th Street Branch, was constructed in 1918-19 to the neo-Renaissance style design of John F. Jackson. Of the total cost of $375,000, Julius Rosenwald contributed $25,000. By the mid-19205, the vicinity of West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue became the hub of African-American social and intellectual life in Harlem. Among the institutions that were located near the YMCA were the New York Public Library (and Schomburg Collecdon), 103 West 135th Street; the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People offices, 224 West 135th Street; the New York Urban League, 202 West 136th Street; 7V.K offices, 2271 Seventh Avenue; and St. Philip's P.E. Church, 210-216 West 134th Street.*' Due to the rapid increase in the African-American population of Harlem, the West 135th Street Branch YMCA was already inadequate and overcrowded by the 1920s, although the building was also considered one of only three "modem" YMCA facilities in Manhattan. Discussion of larger quarters began in 1927. The New York City YMCA, embarking on an extensive new building program, conducted a study over the question of a new building versus an addition for the West 135th Street Branch. A committee under Dr. Channing H. Tobias, senior secretary of the Colored Work Department of the National Council of the YMCA, made recommendations on the occupational, recreational, and educational needs of Harlem residents, emphasizing the serious need for housing for single men, and observed that "because of the social, cultural, and economic restrictions that are found in the Negro's life, the institution [of the YMCA] assumes a significance that is far reaching, and possessed of great possibilities."' Action on the West 135th Street Branch YMCA, however, was delayed for several years. The New York City YMCA finally resolved in March 1930 to construct a new building for the West 135th Street Branch. A wide area of central Harlem was canvassed for a site, but the state's Multiple Dwellings Law (1929) was found to restrict much of the area to lower-scale residential usage. In July, the YMCA acquired a group of dwellings on the south side of West 135th Street (Nos. 174-184), opposite the existing branch, for a building site. The Building Committee of the New York City YMCA's Boa
YMCA Building, 135th Street Branch
YMCA Building, 135th Street Branch
135th Street, Harlem The Young Men's Christian Association (YMCA) Building, 135th Street Branch, was constructed in 1931-32 according to plans prepared by the Architectural Bureau of the National Council of the YMCA and to the design and under the supervision of architect James C. Mackenzie, Jr. This branch was the successor to the "Colored Men's Branch" of the YMCA, located on West 53rd Street between 1901 and 1919, and the West 135th Street Branch YMCA, built in 1918-19 at No. 181, across the street from the later building. African-American YMCAs were the result of the YMCA's official policy of racial segregation, from the organization's beginnings in the United States in 1851 until 1946. Though excluded from white YMCAs, AAican-Americans were encouraged to form separate branches, which became autonomous community centers. The 135th Street Branch YMCA, partially funded by John D. Rockefeller, Jr., Julius Rosenwald, and the Phelps-Stokes Fund, was called at the time of its completion the largest such facility for African-American men and boys, as well as one of the best-equipped YMCA buildings, in the United States. Eleven stories and clad in brick with neo-Georgian style details, the YMCA is C-shaped in plan above the four-story base, has setbacks, and is dominated by a tower that continues to be a major presence on the Harlem skyline. In 1936, the name of the 135th Street Branch was officially changed to the Harlem Branch YMCA. It has served as one of Harlem's most important recreational and cultural centers, and has been a significant purveyor of safe and affordable accommodations. Over the years the "Y" has had associations with many notable figures in the Harlem and African-American communities. The facility is known today as the Harlem YMCA. The West 135th Street Branch YMCA. 1919-1932 As Harlem emerged as the heart of the African-American community in Manhattan in the early twentieth centuiy, most of the major African-American institutions relocated to Harlem. One, the Colored Branch of the Young Women's Christian Association (founded in 1905), moved from a location on 53 rd Street to West 132nd Street in 1913. A Joint Campaign Committee of the YMCA and YWCA, under Jesse Moorland (then international secretary of the YMCA Colored Men's Department), assisted in raising funds for new buildings for both groups. Henry C. Parker, of the noted African-American real estate firm of Nail & Parker,"* was chairman of the committee to select a property in Harlem for the Colored Men's Branch of the YMCA. A lot at 181 West 135th Street was purchased in 1916, and a six-story YMCA building, the West 135th Street Branch, was constructed in 1918-19 to the neo-Renaissance style design of John F. Jackson. Of the total cost of $375,000, Julius Rosenwald contributed $25,000. By the mid-19205, the vicinity of West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue became the hub of African-American social and intellectual life in Harlem. Among the institutions that were located near the YMCA were the New York Public Library (and Schomburg Collecdon), 103 West 135th Street; the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People offices, 224 West 135th Street; the New York Urban League, 202 West 136th Street; 7V.K offices, 2271 Seventh Avenue; and St. Philip's P.E. Church, 210-216 West 134th Street.*' Due to the rapid increase in the African-American population of Harlem, the West 135th Street Branch YMCA was already inadequate and overcrowded by the 1920s, although the building was also considered one of only three "modem" YMCA facilities in Manhattan. Discussion of larger quarters began in 1927. The New York City YMCA, embarking on an extensive new building program, conducted a study over the question of a new building versus an addition for the West 135th Street Branch. A committee under Dr. Channing H. Tobias, senior secretary of the Colored Work Department of the National Council of the YMCA, made recommendations on the occupational, recreational, and educational needs of Harlem residents, emphasizing the serious need for housing for single men, and observed that "because of the social, cultural, and economic restrictions that are found in the Negro's life, the institution [of the YMCA] assumes a significance that is far reaching, and possessed of great possibilities."' Action on the West 135th Street Branch YMCA, however, was delayed for several years. The New York City YMCA finally resolved in March 1930 to construct a new building for the West 135th Street Branch. A wide area of central Harlem was canvassed for a site, but the state's Multiple Dwellings Law (1929) was found to restrict much of the area to lower-scale residential usage. In July, the YMCA acquired a group of dwellings on the south side of West 135th Street (Nos. 174-184), opposite the existing branch, for a building site. The Building Committee of the New York City YMCA's Board of Directors authorized

affordable awnings