Search this site

Welcome!

Wiki-Web

Working Roundtables

posted Jul 6, 2009, 10:42 PM by Margaret Riel   [ updated Jul 6, 2009, 10:50 PM ]
From the AERA site

Working Group Roundtable.
 Working group roundtables encourage substantive exchange and interaction among researchers working on a common set of research issues, problems, or themes. Such roundtable submissions are encouraged from organizers working in areas that are cross-cutting, where there are shared research problems or issues that would benefit from cooperation and exchange, or where researchers with complementary interests would benefit from new, synergistic discussions. Working group roundtable submissions are not eligible for consideration if all of the participants are at the same institution or already involved in formal or ongoing research collaboration. The working group roundtable submission is designed to bring individual researchers or teams of researchers together for discussion where there is potential for new substantive gains and research communication or cooperation. All presenters are expected to prepare a brief paper or commentary paper that frames the issues or problems they wish to advance or examine.

If we want to propose a roundtable, we will need to have brief papers on the topic.  How about how to help action researchers frame their questions in a way that highlights the action and the method of study.  Or another topic might be strategies for teaching reflection.  We can open a wiki page for a working round table and a group can working on it. But there has to be interest.


  • Title. The session title should be entered with proper capitalization: Make Sure That the First Letter of Each Appropriate Word Is Capitalized.
  • Abstract. Submit an abstract of no more than 120 words. Abstracts for accepted sessions will be made publicly available online or in print.
    Session summary. Submit a session summary of no more than 500 words that addresses the following session submission criteria:
    1. Objectives of the session
    2. Overview of the presentation
    3. Scholarly or scientific significance
    4. Structure of the session


  • Title. The title of the presentation should be entered with proper capitalization: Make Sure That the First Letter of Each Appropriate Word Is Capitalized. If the title of the session is the overarching title for all presentations, enter a presentation title that captures the perspective of the presenter.
  • Paper/presentation summary. Submit a summary of no more than 500 words that addresses the basic elements of a research or scholarly paper/presentation:
    1. Objectives or purposes
    2. Perspective(s) or theoretical framework
    3. Methods, techniques, or modes of inquiry
    4. Data sources, evidence, objects, or materials
    5. Results and/or substantiated conclusions or warrants for arguments/point of view, and
    6. Scientific or scholarly significance of the study or work



Comments