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Temple of Fortuna Augusta

Description of the Temple (Reg VII, Ins 4, 1)

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Such inscriptions were normally placed on the entablature of the portico. The portico, however, had been destroyed by the earthquake of AD62 and had not yet been replaced. The cella may also have been damaged, but to allow worship to continue the shrine was restored and the inscription placed over it.
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The cella (C) is fronted by 4 slim Corinthian columns across the face with 3 columns on the side and stands on a raised podium.  With its altar (A) on a projecting platform in front of the podium and a double series of steps, the temple in many respects resembles the nearby Temple of Jupiter. A reconstruction is shown on the right.

Inside the cella part of the central aedicule can still be seen. The aedicule (D) would have contained the image of Fortuna as guardian of the fortunes of Augustus and protectress of the imperial family. The walls of the cella were originally veneered with marble and sustained four lateral niches (two on the north and two on the south side). The niches each contained a statue, two of which have been found. It would appear that both these statues were connected with the priesthood, as opposed to members of the imperial family.
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The Temple of Fortuna Augusta lies at the corner of Via del Foro and Via della Fortuna (pictured below, looking east from the Via delle Terme). The divinity of the temple and the name of its builder and both known from an inscription on the architrave of the shrine at the rear of the cella which translates as:
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 'Marcus Tullius the son of Marcus, duumvir with judiciary authority for the third time, quinquennial duumvir, augur and military tribune by the choice of the people, erected this temple to Fortuna Augusta on his own ground and at his own expense.'
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In donating the land for the temple Tullius retained the ownership of a narrow strip of land immediately to the south of the temple on the Via del Foro. Here a rough block of basalt was set up with the inscription: '
M. Tulli M. f. area privata' which translates as:

'Private property belonging to Marcus Tullius, son of Marcus.'





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