BOAT LIFT CANOPIES. LIFT CANOPIES

BOAT LIFT CANOPIES. HUNTER DOUGLAS WINDOW SHUTTERS. DISCOUNT BLINDS SHADES.

Boat Lift Canopies


boat lift canopies
    boat lift
  • A boat lift, ship lift, or lift lock is a machine for transporting boats between water at two different elevations, and is an alternative to the canal lock and the canal inclined plane.
    canopies
  • Cover or provide with a canopy
  • (canopy) the transparent covering of an aircraft cockpit
  • (canopy) cover with a canopy
  • (canopy) the umbrellalike part of a parachute that fills with air
boat lift canopies - 4500 lbs.
4500 lbs. Vertical Boat Lift - Hoist 108" Beam
4500 lbs. Vertical Boat Lift - Hoist 108" Beam
CraftLander Hoists are Over-Built To Last and are backed by a 2 year mechanical and 15 structural warranty. The vertical lifts have been load tested at double their rated capacity. The stainless steel cables used are 5/16 compared to most manufactures which use on their hoists. The pulleys are enclosed fully inside the beam. Cable life is fully dependent on size pulley & load on cable. Bigger is better. The winches are chain driven with ball bearings making it easier to crank. The two beam construction will carry a lot more weight than rectangular tubes. These aluminum vertical lifts are excellent for low water conditions. All LIFTS ARE SHIPPED FREIGHT COLLECT PLEASE CALL FOR SHIPPING DETAILS 877-388-2628.ul li 4500lb Lifting Capacity/li liWinch 16:1/li li 108" Max Beam (inside width)/li li64" Lift Height/li li10ft Bunks/li li460lb Overall Weight/li li98% Aluminum Construction/li li 5/16" Stainless Steel Cables/li li15 YEAR LIMITED WARRANTY /li liPicture shows optional Carpeted guide ons /li/ul

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Wellpark - the story of a rescue
Wellpark - the story of a rescue
PART 2: We were already in to October 2nd, but I didn’t get to sleep that night. At 6am I headed downstairs to change into deck work clothes. We tended to wear a variety of boiler suits carried over from previous ships. Some cadets had orange or grey boiler-suits, but most had one that had started life as white when first made, or navy blue. Mine was navy blue, but I had torn off the sleeves for extra cooling. We were used to changes in routine and so were prepared for something new in the orders of the day that were being passed from cadet to cadet that morning. As in any survival situation the priority was to provide shelter and the cadets were instructed to raid the ship’s lockers, and anywhere else we could think of, and strip out every available, non-essential, bit of canvas, burlap and other weather proof sheeting we could find to make a shelter for the vulnerable people exposed on top of No.5 hatch. That meant the white canvas screening, with plastic windows, that went around the swimming pool was lashed on top of the games net that enclosed No. 5 hatch. And there were spare winch covers, lifeboat covers, even the ship’s dinghy’s sail, tied haphazardly across the net too. It ended up as an untidy arrangement that gave puny protection from the elements. But fortunately the climate was warm and there was no rain. Even the tropical sun was weaker than usual letting us off with our miserable attempt to make a decent canopy. Drinking water was made available in buckets, and extra drinking cups provided made out of cut down soft drink and beer cans. The ship simply didn't have enough eating and drinking utensils to go round. Most of the Vietnamese had lost their shoes in their escape and as the sun rose higher in the sky the steel deck began to heat up. Some fire hydrants on the deck were opened to allow salt water for washing, but also to cool the deck which was now painful for the Vietnamese to walk on in bare feet Most of the Vietnamese lay, curled up under blankets on the bare steel hatch cover. Some were stirring, sitting up, looking about and a few made the short walk to and from the couple of toilets that were accessible from the deck. They seemed in a daze, exhausted and drained of life by their experience. And they were quiet, not even a noise from the children. Slowly they seemed to come to their senses as the ship’s catering staff came out with food. It was a strange mish-mash of food, our cooks prepared, unsure how to provide for so many of diverse cultures and different ages. Here was a ship equipped and provisioned to feed less than 50, but now had almost 400 mouths to feed. So at breakfast the cadets were surprised to find that the customary choice had gone, and in its place was one ‘hot’ course. Peering at the plate we could see potatoes, beans of various types, meat balls, rice, peas, bacon, tomatoes and mushrooms all boiled into a red-brown stew. It was an unrecognisable meal that I’m sure has no name in a cookery book. As the stewards put the food on our plates, our reactions must have given our thoughts away! What’s this?! But actually to our energy sapped bodies it was good wholesome food and tasted better than it looked, and as the cook explained, it was the same as everyone got……….Vietnamese refugees and Wellpark crew alike. That breakfast was the big one. It was the first proper meal the Vietnamese had had for at least four days. Already the ship’s whole supply of baked beans and oranges had disappeared at the first meal. Outside the sun shone down on the ship. Now it rhythmically rolled gently on the swell as its bow cut through the sparkling waters at full speed. Out of sight of land, our heading was northerly towards Taiwan, but the crew were told that fact must remain secret and could not be divulged to the Vietnamese. There was the risk they might fear being repatriated to Vietnam or held in detention camps and trapped into a life worse than that they had fought to escape from. The Vietnamese were not known to us, and they outnumbered us seven to one. We could not discount the possibility they might wish to over-power us and take control of the ship. That morning we set up a one-way system. The Vietnamese lined up the stairs on the starboard side of the ship and filed, one at a time, into a cabin set aside for medical checks. It had been discovered two of the Vietnamese were professional doctors and it was a priority to check everyone over after the trauma of their escape. Basic personal details such as name, sex, date of birth were recorded, before they were asked to carry on back down to the deck via the staircases on the port side of the ship. There were a few cases of measles and they were confined to the ship’s hospital, and a family which included their grandmother were accommodated in a more private part on the rear of the ship’s accommodation. We were amazed to discover we had 343 ‘passengers’ on board, and as dribs and drabs of their journey before being rescued
NOTES FROM CHRISTMAS ISLAND. CHAPTER 3
NOTES FROM CHRISTMAS ISLAND. CHAPTER 3
Image: Christmas Island Red Crab, found in the rain forest, with an unusual dent in shell. No idea why. Crab was moving normally. Below is the third in a series of five monthly reports I sent back to friends in 2007. Should you be interested, recommend that they be read in order, to get the best out of them. Notes from Christmas Island Chapter 3 SEPTEMBER 2007 For those of you who live in busy times and cannot spare the time to read all of Chapter 3 here is a summary of the contents. Injury, beaches, snorkelling, geological information, scenic lookouts and Hash Runs. If you have to leave it here, thanks for dropping by. Here we go: The nurse’s lovely Irish accent lilted. “There’s definitely something there, I’ll go show the Doctor” The x-ray revealed what the Doctor confirmed, there definitely was something there. A short but definitive break to the little finger of the left hand. Jody’s left hand. She was chatting to my mother, the closest witness, when she stepped off the kerb. From a distance of 25 metres, my vantage point, Jody’s fall had all the grace and elegance of an emu slipping off a rock. The fall was slow, irretrievable following a trajectory of slightly left to right then down, until both knees, hands, a hip and a shoulder were the grazed contact points of skin and bitumen. Ouch and Bugger! That will be putting any proposed snorkelling, mountain bike riding, dishwashing or any dexterous use of her left hand on hold until the bandages and splint are removed. And that’s a shame as snorkelling at our beaches is wicked. There are many beaches on CI with access varying between awesomely convenient and magnificently inconvenient. One in particular is quite a drive, then a serious hike. Carrying a machete, known locally as a parang, to re-clear paths can be necessary. But all beaches have their own rewards. The most commonly used beach is at Flying Fish Cove. Named after HMS Flying Fish when visiting the island in 1887. Flying Fish Cove also blends into the town port. When I mean the town port I really do mean, the Port right in the middle of Town Attentive readers will recall from Chapter 2 the Kampong is a residential area directly across the road from the ocean. Despite being a working port for over a hundred years the coral is in good condition and generally visibility is very good. With flippers, mask and snorkel fish and coral can be seen within the first 10 metres from shore. CI juts out of the ocean very steeply. Very little fringing reef or continental shelf exists. Think of it as the top of an undersea mountain. Even within the confines of Flying Fish Cove when we, if our hands aren’t broken, swim out say 30 metres from the coast, the ocean floor drops away. One moment rock and sand are 10 metres below the surface, the next moment it is hundreds of metres down to the bottom, it just drop’s off. Just like that. The drop off is called the Drop Off! It truly is the Deep Blue without any exaggeration whatsoever. Ships that come into the port actually tie up on one side to the port rockwall. Their anchors just can’t cut it. The ocean side of the ship secures to permanent anchorage buoys. Despite being within a hundred or so metres from the coast these buoys themselves are anchored to the ocean floor 400 metres below or 222 fathoms. The convenience of these depths for recreational divers is remarkable. Divers who want to dive deep to see our wonderful marine ecosystem do not have to travel for kilometres out into the ocean to get to the good stuff. They can either swim out from the beach or travel short distances out. What’s it like out in the cove? The fish’s laugh, the birds smile, coral is waving and the rocks stand proudly in the sand. [Bit of Bob Dylan there.] Another maritime point of interest, three weeks ago a whale, either Humpback or Southern Right Whale swam by. Numerous independent sightings were reported. Unfortunately I did not get to see this one. Also on the whale front, a few Orcas / Killer Whales / Free Willys were seen from the coast in front of our place. Missed them too. But twice I have seen pods of the smallish Spinner Dolphins. The first occasion was when Jody and I went out on a boat along the coast for some snorkelling. As we rounded the point away from Flying Fish Cove suddenly three, four or five dolphins parallelled the boat. Would I like to swim with them? The question was floated. Sure would. Quickly, it was off with the hat, shirt and sunnies. Slowly, slowly on with the gear but fun loving Spinners wait for no one. By the time I was in the water they were heading away. All I felt was a very clear, very blue ocean and very deep isolation. Right, now where is the boat! Back on deck and within twenty minutes our boat was tied up to a buoy ready for snorkelling up against a cliff face. As the swell surged us back, forth, up and down we viewed masses of fish busily living their lives with eternal vigilance. Looking for p

boat lift canopies
boat lift canopies
Neiko Bicycle Lift, Hoist Ceiling Mount Bike Storage
Don't let bikes take over your garage - store bikes safely up and out of the way. Twin pulley system gently lifts bike at seat & handlebars with anti-scratch PVC-dipped hooks. Safety locking mechanism prevents accidental release while lowering; rope tie-down cleat included. Installs in minutes on ceilings up to 14'; fits all styles of bikes to 50 lbs. Strong all-steel construction with anti-corroding powder coat. One lift lifts and stores one bike. The better way to store your bikes! Lets you 'create' additional garage storage space overhead; saves damage to bikes and vehicle scratches. Includes pulleys and mounts, padded lift hooks, rope & cleat, mounting hardware & clear installation instructions.

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