AC ELECTRIC MOTOR REPAIR. MOTOR REPAIR

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Ac Electric Motor Repair


ac electric motor repair
    electric motor
  • An electric motor uses electrical energy to produce mechanical energy, very typically through the interaction of magnetic fields and current-carrying conductors. The reverse process, producing electrical energy from mechanical energy, is accomplished by an alternator, generator or dynamo.
  • a motor that converts electricity to mechanical work
  • A device which changes electrical energy into rotational motion. In addition to the starter and windshield wiper motors, which were the first electric motors to be added to the automotive electrical system, modern cars include a large number of small motors for driving such items as the electric
    repair
  • Fix or mend (a thing suffering from damage or a fault)
  • Make good (such damage) by fixing or repairing it
  • Put right (a damaged relationship or unwelcome situation)
  • restore by replacing a part or putting together what is torn or broken; "She repaired her TV set"; "Repair my shoes please"
  • a formal way of referring to the condition of something; "the building was in good repair"
  • the act of putting something in working order again
    ac
  • The chemical element actinium
  • actinium: a radioactive element of the actinide series; found in uranium ores
  • alternating current: an electric current that reverses direction sinusoidally; "In the US most household current is AC at 60 cycles per second"
  • .ac is the Internet country code top-level domain (ccTLD) for Ascension Island. It is administered by NIC.AC, a subsidiary of the Internet Computer Bureau based in the United Kingdom.
ac electric motor repair - Audel Electric
Audel Electric Motors (Audel Technical Trades Series)
Audel Electric Motors (Audel Technical Trades Series)
Here's the ultimate motor tool

If you need information about installing, repairing, and maintaining any type of electric motor, this book belongs in your toolbox. Completely revised and illustrated, it covers principles of motor function, choosing and replacing motors, identifying and repairing common problems, performing routine maintenance, and more, all without excessive math. It's the guide your father relied on, now fully updated for the twenty-first century.
* Understand both AC and DC motor function and operation
* Repair small series motors and troubleshoot special types of motors
* Compare methods of motor control, including various switches, starters, and timing relays
* Troubleshoot fractional horsepower motors, including split-phase induction, capacitor start, repulsion, shaded-pole, hysteresis synchronous, and universal motors
* Learn the best procedures for stripping and rewinding armatures and stators
* Modify AC motors for speed control
* Discover which tools and supplies you'll always need

78% (12)
56032 1977 07 Shireoaks
56032 1977 07 Shireoaks
Brand new and on test from Doncaster works where it was built 56032 heads west through Shireoaks with a test train of air braked bogie bolster steel wagons and Pullman Parlour First E330 which was used for housing staff working with the trials who could not be accommodated in the cab of the locomotive, 6th July 1977. E330 was from a batch of vehicles built by Metro-Cammell in 1960, based on the BR Mark I coach design and continued in service until early 1978. It was withdrawn due to the insulation material in the car being asbestos. In September 1974 British Rail ordered sixty new heavy freight locomotives designated class 56. The order was split with thirty locomotives to be built by Brush and thirty locomotives to be built by Doncaster works. The body design was derived from the Brush class 47 and was of the load bearing monocoque type. The engine (GEC 16RK3CT) was of English Electric heritage and an uprated version to that fitted to the class 50. Although the engine was rated at 3520bhp in the class 56 it was derated to 3250bhp. The electrical equipment was derived from the Brush prototype locomotive HS4000 Kestrel and consisted of a Brush BA1101A 3-phase ac alternator driving six TM73-62 series wound, axle hung nose suspended traction motors. The bogies (designated CP2) were a Swiss design. Although ordered in September 1974 the first of the Doncaster works batch did not start physical construction until July 1976 when the fabricated bodyshells of the first two (56031/32) started to appear. Progress was slow due to shortage of labour and late delivery of components and 56031 eventually entered traffic on the 13th May 1977. As can be seen it was almost another two months before 56032 was ready and following this test run 56032 was released from Doncaster works on the 20th July 1977 and allocated to Toton MPD. After over twenty six years service 56032 was stored in January 2004 after suffering a serious oil leak. However in 2005 it was selected for overseas service in France with Fertis and repaired, repainted and dispatched to France for engineering train duties in May 2005. It returned from France at the end of October 2006 and was stored at Old Oak Common until moved up to Crewe Diesel Depot for further storage in May 2009, where it currently (April 2011) can be found.
56031 1977 10 Toton
56031 1977 10 Toton
A grey, misty day at Toton MPD finds 56031 stabled in front of the depot awaiting its next duty, 16th October 1977. In September 1974 British Rail ordered sixty new heavy freight locomotives designated class 56. The order was split with thirty locomotives to be built by Brush and thirty locomotives to be built by Doncaster works. The body design was derived from the Brush class 47 and was of the load bearing monocoque type. The engine (GEC 16RK3CT) was of English Electric heritage and an uprated version to that fitted to the class 50. Although the engine was rated at 3520bhp in the class 56 it was derated to 3250bhp. The electrical equipment was derived from the Brush prototype locomotive HS4000 Kestrel and consisted of a Brush BA1101A 3-phase ac alternator driving six TM73-62 series wound, axle hung nose suspended traction motors. The bogies (designated CP2) were a Swiss design. Although ordered in September 1974 the first of the Doncaster works batch did not start physical construction until July 1976 when the fabricated bodyshells of the first two (56031/32) started to appear. Progress was slow due to shortage of labour and late delivery of components and 56031 eventually entered traffic on the 13th May 1977. In late 1999 56031 suffered cab damage following a collision near Redcar and was stored at Thornaby until March 2000 when it was reinstated following repair using replacement cab roof sections removed from 56035 at Wigan CRDC. It was stored again in July 2002, however in 2005 it was selected for overseas service in France with Fertis and repaired, repainted and dispatched to France for engineering train duties at the end of June 2006. It returned from France at the end of December 2006 and was stored at Old Oak Common until moved up to Crewe Diesel Depot for further storage in May 2009, where it currently (January 2011) can be found.

ac electric motor repair
ac electric motor repair
Electric Motor Maintenance and Troubleshooting, 2nd Edition
A fully up-to-date, hands-on guide to electric motors
Keep electric motors running at peak performance! Electric Motor Maintenance and Troubleshooting, Second Edition explains in detail how all types of AC and DC motors work. Essential for anyone who needs to buy, install, troubleshoot, maintain, or repair small to industrial-size electric motors, this practical guide contains new information on three-phase motors along with coverage of the latest test instruments.
Drawing on his more than 40 years of experience working with electric motors, expert author Augie Hand provides a wealth of tested procedures to pinpoint and correct any kind of issue. He'll help you decide whether to replace a motor, take it offline for repair, or repair it in place--decisions that can reduce down time. End-of-chapter questions reinforce the material covered in the book. Quickly and accurately diagnose electric motor problems and find effective solutions with help from this fully updated classic.
Electric Motor Maintenance and Troubleshooting, Second Edition covers:
Troubleshooting and testing DC machines
AC electric motor theory
Single-phase motors
Three-phase induction motors
Troubleshooting less common motors, including synchronous, two-speed one-winding, and multispeed
Test instruments and services