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    lamp shades
  • (Lamp shade) A lampshade is a fixture that covers the lightbulb on a lamp to diffuse the light it emits. Conical, cylindrical and other forms on floor-, desk- or table top-mounted as well as suspended lamp models are the most common and are made in a wide range of materials.
  • (Lamp Shade) The shade serves the important function of blocking the glare from a light bulb and is usually the most decorative part of a lamp. The lamp shade can be made of glass, fabric, metal, or other more creative materials.
  • (lamp shade) lampshade: a protective ornamental shade used to screen a light bulb from direct view
    custom
  • A thing that one does habitually
  • custom-made: made according to the specifications of an individual
  • accepted or habitual practice
  • Established practice or usage having the force of law or right
  • A traditional and widely accepted way of behaving or doing something that is specific to a particular society, place, or time
  • a specific practice of long standing
    nyc
  • New York is the most populous city in the United States, and the center of the New York metropolitan area, which is one of the most populous metropolitan areas in the world.
  • New York City
  • .nyc is a proposed city-level top-level domain for New York City.
  • Pennsylvania Station — commonly known as Penn Station — is the major intercity train station and a major commuter rail hub in New York City. It is one of the busiest rail stations in the world, and a hub for inboard and outboard railroad traffic in New York City.

Broadway Chambers Building
Broadway Chambers Building
Civic Center, Manhattan The Broadway Chambers Building is a distinctive, international award-winning office building designed by the prominent architect, Cass Gilbert, in the Beaux-Arts style, a classically-inspired style that became popular in the United States after the World's Columbian Exposition held in Chicago in 1893. Built in 1899-1900, the building is notable for the striking use of color in its design which employs a tripartite scheme analogous to the classical column. Preeminent critic, Montgomery Schuyler, called the Broadway Chambers Building, It•••the summation of that type of design of a tall building.It Each element of the design --granite base, brick shaft, and glazed terra-cotta capital --is differentiated by material and color. The use of polychromy to emphasize the different nature of each material and to enhance the tripartite scheme distinguishes the Broadway Chambers Building from many of its contemporaries which were often executed in a light monochrome palette following the example of the great exhibit halls of the Chicago Exposition. As is characteristic of the Beaux-Arts style, the building is richly ornamented, incorporating Hermes and lions heads in a monumental scale, a dramatically arcuated crown and a wealth of garlands, wreaths, and festoons. The building is important within Gilbert's career because it was his first design built in New York City --to be followed by such landmarks as the U.S. Customs House and the Woolworth Building. The Broadway Chambers Building is located on the northwest comer of the intersection of Broadway and Chambers Street. Broadway is one of the oldest roads on Manhattan Island and sections of it predate European settlement. Chambers Street, named after John Chambers, a corporate counsel, alderman, and Supreme Court judge between 1727 and 1765, was ceded to the City of New York by the Trinity Church Corporation in 1761. The land on which the Broadway Chambers Building stands was first developed by Anthony Steenbach about 1791 with a row of one-story buildings fronting on Chambers Street. In the early nineteenth century, the stretch of Broadway between Chambers and Worth Streets was a mixture of residential buildings and substantial institutions such as Washington Hall (1809-12) which was designed by John McComb, Jr., one of the architects of the City Hall, and was the headquarters of the Washington Benevolent Society, a Federalist organization; and the New York Hospital (opened 1791) which occupied the west side of Broadway between Duane and Worth Streets. Broadway, north of Chambers Street, maintained a combination of institutions, residences, and shops until AT. Stewart built his famous department store on the site of Washington Hall in 1846. The building, later known as the Sun Building, still stands and is a designated New York City Landmark. The character of Broadway north of Chambers rapidly became strictly commercial. When opened in April, 1900, the Broadway Chambers Building was recognized internationally as a distinguished New York City skyscraper, garnering a number of awards at the International Universal Exposition held in Paris that year. IO The building is one of the best examples of a solution to an architectural problem that had challenged New York architects during the last quarter of the nineteenth century. That problem had been to produce an aesthetically effective treatment for the tall commercial building. a relatively new building type iri the city. The evolution of the skyscraper as a building type during the nineteenth century was influenced by the introduction of the passenger elevator. cast­iron and steel-frame construction. and rising land costs. The use of cast-iron as a structural and facade material began to flower at the end of the 1840s and in the early 1850s, encouraged, in part. by Daniel Badger and James Bogardus. The fabrication of the cast-iron facade produced a system of standardization for building units that led to speed and economy in the erection of buildings. These systems. along with the elevator, were instrumental in the creation of the modern skyscraper. The system of iron framing developed at that time which was later translated into steel made it possible for the construction of tall buildings that were strong yet lightweight and open in their structure. maximized valuable rental space by allowing for increased height. and. by eliminating bulky masonry bearing walls and piers, freed the interior partitions and exterior walls from any load-bearing function. As building heights began to respond to technological advances in the 1870s and 1880s, architects started to grapple with the implications for style and design. An array of varied stylistiC responses to tall buildings during these decades Was characterized in 1909 by critic Montgomery Schuyler as "wild work.· By the late 1880s. designers of tall buildings began to adopt a tripartite scheme that remained popular for several decades. Th
Broadway Chambers Building
Broadway Chambers Building
Civic Center, Manhattan, New York City, New York, United States The Broadway Chambers Building is a distinctive, international award-winning office building designed by the prominent architect, Cass Gilbert, in the Beaux-Arts style, a classically-inspired style that became popular in the United States after the World's Columbian Exposition held in Chicago in 1893. Built in 1899-1900, the building is notable for the striking use of color in its design which employs a tripartite scheme analogous to the classical column. Preeminent critic, Montgomery Schuyler, called the Broadway Chambers Building, It•••the summation of that type of design of a tall building.It Each element of the design --granite base, brick shaft, and glazed terra-cotta capital --is differentiated by material and color. The use of polychromy to emphasize the different nature of each material and to enhance the tripartite scheme distinguishes the Broadway Chambers Building from many of its contemporaries which were often executed in a light monochrome palette following the example of the great exhibit halls of the Chicago Exposition. As is characteristic of the Beaux-Arts style, the building is richly ornamented, incorporating Hermes and lions heads in a monumental scale, a dramatically arcuated crown and a wealth of garlands, wreaths, and festoons. The building is important within Gilbert's career because it was his first design built in New York City --to be followed by such landmarks as the U.S. Customs House and the Woolworth Building. The Broadway Chambers Building is located on the northwest comer of the intersection of Broadway and Chambers Street. Broadway is one of the oldest roads on Manhattan Island and sections of it predate European settlement. Chambers Street, named after John Chambers, a corporate counsel, alderman, and Supreme Court judge between 1727 and 1765, was ceded to the City of New York by the Trinity Church Corporation in 1761. The land on which the Broadway Chambers Building stands was first developed by Anthony Steenbach about 1791 with a row of one-story buildings fronting on Chambers Street. In the early nineteenth century, the stretch of Broadway between Chambers and Worth Streets was a mixture of residential buildings and substantial institutions such as Washington Hall (1809-12) which was designed by John McComb, Jr., one of the architects of the City Hall, and was the headquarters of the Washington Benevolent Society, a Federalist organization; and the New York Hospital (opened 1791) which occupied the west side of Broadway between Duane and Worth Streets. Broadway, north of Chambers Street, maintained a combination of institutions, residences, and shops until AT. Stewart built his famous department store on the site of Washington Hall in 1846. The building, later known as the Sun Building, still stands and is a designated New York City Landmark. The character of Broadway north of Chambers rapidly became strictly commercial. When opened in April, 1900, the Broadway Chambers Building was recognized internationally as a distinguished New York City skyscraper, garnering a number of awards at the International Universal Exposition held in Paris that year. IO The building is one of the best examples of a solution to an architectural problem that had challenged New York architects during the last quarter of the nineteenth century. That problem had been to produce an aesthetically effective treatment for the tall commercial building. a relatively new building type iri the city. The evolution of the skyscraper as a building type during the nineteenth century was influenced by the introduction of the passenger elevator. cast­iron and steel-frame construction. and rising land costs. The use of cast-iron as a structural and facade material began to flower at the end of the 1840s and in the early 1850s, encouraged, in part. by Daniel Badger and James Bogardus. The fabrication of the cast-iron facade produced a system of standardization for building units that led to speed and economy in the erection of buildings. These systems. along with the elevator, were instrumental in the creation of the modern skyscraper. The system of iron framing developed at that time which was later translated into steel made it possible for the construction of tall buildings that were strong yet lightweight and open in their structure. maximized valuable rental space by allowing for increased height. and. by eliminating bulky masonry bearing walls and piers, freed the interior partitions and exterior walls from any load-bearing function. As building heights began to respond to technological advances in the 1870s and 1880s, architects started to grapple with the implications for style and design. An array of varied stylistiC responses to tall buildings during these decades Was characterized in 1909 by critic Montgomery Schuyler as "wild work.· By the late 1880s. designers of tall buildings began to adopt a tripartite scheme that

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