POST ROAD INN MOTEL. INN MOTEL

POST ROAD INN MOTEL. HOTELS IN ST MALO. CARA LODGE HOTEL.

Post Road Inn Motel


post road inn motel
    post road
  • a road over which mail is carried
  • A post road is a road designated for the transportation of postal mail. In past centuries only major towns had a post house, and the roads used by post riders or mail coaches to carry mail among them were particularly important ones or, due to the special attention given them, became so.
    motel
  • a motor hotel
  • A roadside hotel designed primarily for motorists, typically having the rooms arranged in a low building with parking directly outside
  • A motel is a hotel designed for motorists, and usually has a parking area for motor vehicles. They are common in the United States.
  • Motel is the debut album by the Mexican soul-rock band, of the same name. The album was released in March 28, 2006, in Mexico, their homeland. And later, after four months, the album was released in countries like Guatemala, Venezuela, Chile, and the United States.
    inn
  • hostel: a hotel providing overnight lodging for travelers
  • Indium nitride is a small bandgap semiconductor material which has potential application in solar cells and high speed electronics.
  • An establishment providing accommodations, food, and drink, esp. for travelers
  • Inns are generally establishments or buildings where travelers can seek lodging and, usually, food and drink. They are typically located in the country or along a highway.
  • A restaurant or bar, typically one in the country, in some cases providing accommodations
post road inn motel - The King's
The King's Best Highway: The Lost History of the Boston Post Road, the Route That Made America
The King's Best Highway: The Lost History of the Boston Post Road, the Route That Made America
A VIVID AND FASCINATING LOOK AT AMERICAN HISTORY THROUGH THE PRISM OF THE COUNTRY’S MOST STORIED HIGHWAY, THE BOSTON POST ROAD During its evolution from Indian trails to modern interstates, the Boston Post Road, a system of over-land routes between New York City and Boston, has carried not just travelers and mail but the march of American history itself. Eric Jaffe captures the progress of people and culture along the road through four centuries, from its earliest days as the king of England’s “best highway” to the current era. Centuries before the telephone, radio, or Internet, the Boston Post Road was the primary conduit of America’s prosperity and growth. News, rumor, political intrigue, financial transactions, and personal missives traveled with increasing rapidity, as did people from every walk of life. From post riders bearing the alarms of revolution, to coaches carrying George Washington on his first presidential tour, to railroads transporting soldiers to the Civil War, the Boston Post Road has been essential to the political, economic, and social development of the United States. Continuously raised, improved, rerouted, and widened for faster and heavier traffic, the road played a key role in the advent of newspapers, stagecoach travel, textiles, mass-produced bicycles and guns, commuter railroads, automobiles—even Manhattan’s modern grid. Many famous Americans traveled the highway, and it drew the keen attention of such diverse personages as Benjamin Franklin, Franklin D. Roosevelt, P. T. Barnum, J. P. Morgan, and Robert Moses. Eric Jaffe weaves this entertaining narrative with a historian’s eye for detail and a journalist’s flair for storytelling. A cast of historical figures, celebrated and unknown alike, tells the lost tale of this road.
Revolutionary printer William Goddard created a postal network that united the colonies against the throne. General Washington struggled to hold the highway during the battle for Manhattan. Levi Pease convinced Americans to travel by stagecoach until, half a century later, Nathan Hale convinced them to go by train. Abe Lincoln, still a dark-horse candidate in early 1860, embarked on a railroad speaking tour along the route that clinched the presidency. Bomb builder Lester Barlow, inspired by the Post Road’s notorious traffic, nearly sold Congress on a national system of expressways twenty-five years before the Interstate Highway Act of 1956. Based on extensive travels of the highway, interviews with people living up and down the road, and primary sources unearthed from the great libraries between New York City and Boston—including letters, maps, contemporaneous newspapers, and long-forgotten government documents—The King’s Best Highway is a delightful read for American history buffs and lovers of narrative everywhere.

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Road toadstool. White cliffs.
Road toadstool. White cliffs.
0 PHOTOGRAPH PARTICULARS 0 Toadstools. A place I hiked to in 2008 but the early morning light on this visit made it a very special place indeed. They have improved the easily accessible trailhead with a new sign and some free informative pamphlets. Well worth a stop when traveling through the area. The trailhead for the toadstools is on Utah highway 89 1.4 miles east of the BLM Paria rangers’ station (where the Wave lotteries are held) and just 1.6 miles west of the south terminus to the fun dirt “Cottonwood Road”. In the Grand Canyon there are at least two layers (representing millions of years) that are gone. They were eroded away before the next “new” layer was added on top. This is called an “unconformity” by geologists. I knew about the Grand Canyon unconformities but I had no idea that an unconformity played a roll in the formation of the “toadstool” area here along highway 89. Paraphrasing the good information in the small trail pamphlet: [The “bottom” layer of rocks at the toadstools is around 160 millions old (The Entrada Formation). The top layer is 97 million years old and called the Dakota Formation. In between once resided the Morrison Formation (the middle of the rock sandwich), but it was eroded completely away before the Dakota Formation rocks made their appearance]. The boundaries between rock layers at the toadstool are noticeably “tilted” in places and there are dramatic differences in the color and texture of different layers. So, an interesting geological history and some worthy for photo ops formations as a result. Plan to take your camera on the very short hike to this place, if you haven’t already been. 0 ACTIVITIES DAY TEN OF TWELVE 0 If there was one day to “live again” on this road trip then day TEN was it. It was outstanding from start to finish. The weather was A1 perfect. We had a little dirt road travel with the windows of the Jeep rolled down and a lot of good photo ops at the many different places we traveled. Oh yes, a great meal at the Escalante Outfitters to end the day properly. We left Page, Arizona before dawn. We watched the sun come up over Navajo Mountain and Lake Powell. Then on to “The Toadstools” off highway 89 for a short hike and some great early morning light on those formations. We then backtracked 1.6 miles fto the Cottonwood road (a road I had driven recently in my pickup truck, only from north to south), and enjoyed a clear warm blue sky day drive up to Butler (Grosvenor) arch. From Butler arch, we went on to Kodachrome Basin, where we took a short three mile loop hike. I loved the campground at Kodachrome and have promised my wife that we will camp there together and take some of the longer hikes available in that pretty little state park (Oh yes, the campground has HOT showers). from Kodachrome Basin state park, we drove up to Bryce National Park. LOTS of snow, but beautiful on a sunny day (few other people). We ate at the Subway just outside Ruby Inn - then drove on to Rainbow Point, which at 9,100 feet, had plenty of snow (about three feet worth along the lookout path). Then we worked our way back out Bryce, stopping to photograph at each and every lookout point that had been plowed, enjoying Bryce as the sun dropped down low and the light changed by the minute. After Bryce we backtracked again and drove on to Escalante, Utah (one of my often visited and favorite “base camps”), where we had reserved rooms by phone at the rustic but friendly: Circle “D” motel (ask for Robert and tell him Oldmantravels with the old red Toyota pickup truck sent you). After checking in at the Circle “D”, we headed over to the Escalante Outfitters ( hiking supply, books, free internet use, excellent food, really friendly people cafe) - - for a big dinner a cold beer, pizza, and a “toast” to the best road trip day we had enjoyed thus far. We had LOTS of dirt road destinations in mind for day 11 of the road trip (the next day) BUT we were in for quite a surprise the next morning at Escalante. So like on all good road trips, you stay flexible, make the best of what comes your way, and go for it and that is exactly what we did. 0 3,875 MILE/12 DAY ~ 4 CORNERS ROAD TRIP OVERVIEW 0 At the start of year 2011, I made tentative plans to take a two week solo “road trip” through the Four Corners area (The Colorado Plateau), during the last half of March. Then, if my wife could get the time needed off from her part time job, I also planned a “road trip” vacation to the Southwest, in April with her. When I put the plan together for the March trip, I decided to see if an old friend of mine, Ed (Flickr’s: OldWrangler), might be interested in joining me. I volunteered to take my old four wheel drive pickup truck and split the gasoline expense with him. We would each get an inexpensive motel room on the road to serve as “base camps” to hike, photograph, and explore back roads in the Four Corners area. Not only did Ed accept but he also proposed that we take his brand
Bluebird Motel and Restaurant in Valparaiso, Indiana - Matchcover
Bluebird Motel and Restaurant in Valparaiso, Indiana - Matchcover
Bluebird Inn & Restaurant Lawrence and Madge Caprous Gateway to Toll Road JCT. Hiways 6 & 49 Valparaiso, Ind. Phone 4-6304 18 Clean Comfortable Units Air Conditioned TV Sizzling Steak & Chicken Hot Rolls & Home Made Pies We Cater To Parties & Banquets Source Type: Matchcover Publisher, Printer, Photographer: Lion Match Company Collection: Steven R. Shook Remark: The Bluebird Inn and Restaurant was located in Liberty Township, between Valparaiso and Chesterton, with a Valparaiso post office address. Interestingly, the telephone number printed on this matchcover is the same number as the zip code for Chesterton, Indiana.

post road inn motel
post road inn motel
Post Roads & Iron Horses: Transportation in Connecticut from Colonial Times to the Age of Steam (The Driftless Connecticut Series & Garnet Books)
Post Roads & Iron Horses is the first book to look in detail at the turnpikes, steamboats, canals, railroads, and trolleys (street railroads) that helped define Connecticut and shape New England. Advances in transportation technology during the nineteenth century transformed the Constitution State from a rough network of colonial towns to an industrial powerhouse of the Gilded Age. From the race to build the Farmington Canal to the shift from water to rail transport, historian and transportation engineer Richard DeLuca gives us engaging stories and traces the significant themes that emerge as American innovators and financiers, lawyers and legislators, struggle to control the movement of passengers and goods in southern New England. The book contains over fifty historical images and maps, and provides an excellent point of view from which to interpret the history of New England as a whole. This is an indispensable reference book for those interested in Connecticut history and a great gift for transportation buffs of all kinds.

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