GRAND BOHEMIAN HOTEL AND RESIDENCES - HOTEL AND RESIDENCES

Grand bohemian hotel and residences - Jolly hotel bergamo.

Grand Bohemian Hotel And Residences


grand bohemian hotel and residences
    residences
  • (residence) residency: the act of dwelling in a place
  • The official house of a government minister or other public and official figure
  • The fact of living in a particular place
  • (residence) the official house or establishment of an important person (as a sovereign or president); "he refused to live in the governor's residence"
  • (residence) any address at which you dwell more than temporarily; "a person can have several residences"
  • A person's home; the place where someone lives
    bohemian
  • Gypsy: a member of a people with dark skin and hair who speak Romany and who traditionally live by seasonal work and fortunetelling; they are believed to have originated in northern India but now are living on all continents (but mostly in Europe, North Africa, and North America)
  • A person who has informal and unconventional social habits, esp. an artist or writer
  • of or relating to Bohemia or its language or people
  • A native or inhabitant of Bohemia
  • a native or inhabitant of Bohemia in the Czech Republic
    grand
  • Magnificent and imposing in appearance, size, or style
  • (of a person) Of high rank and with an appearance and manner appropriate to it
  • Designed to impress through scale or splendor
  • thousand: the cardinal number that is the product of 10 and 100
  • august: of or befitting a lord; "heir to a lordly fortune"; "of august lineage"
  • expansive: of behavior that is impressive and ambitious in scale or scope; "an expansive lifestyle"; "in the grand manner"; "collecting on a grand scale"; "heroic undertakings"
    hotel
  • An establishment providing accommodations, meals, and other services for travelers and tourists
  • A code word representing the letter H, used in radio communication
  • A hotel is an establishment that provides paid lodging on a short-term basis. The provision of basic accommodation, in times past, consisting only of a room with a bed, a cupboard, a small table and a washstand has largely been replaced by rooms with modern facilities, including en-suite
  • In French contexts an hotel particulier is an urban "private house" of a grand sort. Whereas an ordinary maison was built as part of a row, sharing party walls with the houses on either side and directly fronting on a street, an hotel particulier was often free-standing, and by the eighteenth
  • a building where travelers can pay for lodging and meals and other services
grand bohemian hotel and residences - A Desirable
A Desirable Residence
A Desirable Residence
From the author of the sensational bestselling Sophie Kinsella novels and the New York Times bestsellers The Wedding Girl and Sleeping Arrangements, comes a wicked comedy of adultery, angst, and modern marriage
The asking price for this house includes a stunning renovation of hearts and dreams....Liz and Jonathan Chambers were stuck with two mortgages, mounting debts, and a miserable adolescent daughter. Then realtor Marcus Witherstone came into their lives—and it seemed he would solve all their problems. He knew the perfect tenants from London who would rent their old house: a glamorous PR girl, Ginny, and her almost-famous husband, Piers.
But soon Liz is lost in blissful dreams of Marcus, Jonathan is left to run their business, and neither of them has time to notice that their teenage daughter is developing an unhealthy passion for the tenants, Piers and Ginny. Everyone is tangled up with everyone else, and in the most awkward possible way. As events close in, they all begin to realize that some deceptions are just a bit too close to home.
A Desirable Residence is sure to continue the phenomenal success of the Sophie Kinsella/Madeleine Wickham franchise.

81% (19)
Aldrich Residence; Wichita KS
Aldrich Residence; Wichita KS
This photo of the Ben Aldrich home in Wichita, KS was taken about 1890. This house was commonly known as Wichita's "Chateau on the Hill". An exact address for this residence is unknown, but if one stood at 3800 E. Douglas Avenue, this house would have been clearly in view. This house was torn down to make way for the Blessed Sacrament Catholic Church. Ben Adrich was a druggist (commonly called a pharmacist today) and he was also a Mayor of Wichita for a short time (1885 - 1886). Several stylistic features of this residence strongly indicate that his home was both designed and built by William Henry Sternberg (1832 - 1906). Sternberg is known to have taken popular features and re-used them in different combinations on homes he designed and built. This home is a collection of virtually identical features found on other confirmed Sternberg homes. The strongest evidence that his residence was built by W.H. Sternberg is the use of diamond designs in the slate roofing. Similar diamond patterns are seen in the roof of this home (and in similar locations, i.e., porch roof) as was done in Sternberg Mansion and the M.J. Oliver residence - both confirmed Sternberg-designed and built homes. In Wichita, diamond designs within roof shingles have only been observed on Sternberg-designed structures. Diamond patterns in the roof are known on to have existed two confirmed Sternberg homes (the Sternberg Mansion and the Mark J. Oliver Residence). Also diamond designs in the roof are not known to exist on any residential structure that was not designed and built by Sternberg. Confirmation that the Greiffenstien Mansion was designed and built by Sternberg has not yet been obtained, however much evidence indicates that it was designed & built by Sternberg and it also had simiar diamond patterns in the roof. On both of those (confirmed) Sternberg homes diamond patterns (virtually identical as here) appear on the porch roofs, awnings and /or the main roof. Although it's difficult to discern from this photo, there appear to be white "V"-shaped zig-zag style lines at the very apex of the roof (on the large dormer in between the two chimney flues). Sternberg was also known to have used this design in similar places of other confirmed Sternberg-designed Sternberg-built residences (such as Sternberg Mansion). Other stylistic features about this house which appear in other Sternberg homes include: highly corbelled chimney flues where ornate brick work flows down into the main walls of the home, three main porches on the main level, a broken roof design with multiple angles and multiple shapes to the roof, a square 3-story tower (reminiscent of the Pratt-Campbell Mansion - a confirmed Sternberg design), arched windows (reminiscent of the Maurice Levy Mansion), castelated brick corbelling under the 2nd-story eave (reminiscent of two other confirmed Sternberg homes) and more. Information indicates that Sternberg traveled to the World's Fair in Paris in 1855 and came back from that introducing a variety of European or French styles. In New York State, historians credit Sternberg with having introduced the Mansard-style roof at least into southern New York State in approximately 1855. While mansard roofs undoubtedly existed in upper New York State, they were not common and usually only seen on very upscale homes for the ultra-wealthy. Sternberg popularized this french roof style making it much more common to the mid- to upper class homeowners. Various stylistic features of Sternberg homes indicate that he continued to be strongly influenced by French and/or European styles. Indeed the first home built with a Mansard roof in Norwich, New York, belonged to Sternberg. In Wichita, not uncommonly he designed homes with double flanking gazebos (as in the Fraker house) or double flanking multi-tiered fountains (as in the Greiffenstein Mansion and the J.A Wallace home). These "outlying" decorative structures created a stately symmetry familiar to European courts. Sternberg was born in Norwich, New York and in addition to designing and contracting also served as mayor of the town for a period. Other homes both in New York and in Kansas (some designed by Sternberg and some not) incorporated this popular Victorian design. Just as Sternberg had done in Wichita with the Sternberg Mansion, he used his own house in Norwich, NY as a showcase home to help popularize the mansard style by building his own house with that then unfamiliar style - which eventually became a wildly popular Victorian style. The mansard roof was just one design known to be used and promoted by Sternberg and we clearly see that here in the Ben Aldrich residence. Other Sternberg design elements that incorporate a French or European flair include multi-tiered fountains with circular ground-level collecting pools. These types of elegant fountains were fairly common in larger cities throughout Europe, but were not being d
Résidence Rives Stanislas
Résidence Rives Stanislas
Residence Rives Stanislas 2006 Architecte : SCPA Gallet & Duong

grand bohemian hotel and residences
grand bohemian hotel and residences
The British Ambassador's Residence in Paris
This beautifully illustrated book celebrates the British Ambassador's Residence in Paris, one of the most splendid historic homes in the French capital and the most impressive of all British ambassadorial residences abroad. The author, Tim Knox, charts the stirring story of the house, from its origins as the home of the Ducs de Charost, to its opulent heyday under Napoleon's sister, Pauline Bonaparte, Princess Borghese, much of whose luxurious furniture and decoration survives intact. Since 1814, when Pauline sold the house to the 1st Duke of Wellington, the mansion has served as the residence of successive British Ambassadors to France, who altered the house to suit their taste and character, notably Sir Duff Cooper and his beautiful wife, Lady Diana, whose Empire-style study is still redolent of their brilliant social circle in Post-War Paris. This beautiful house in the rue du Faubourg St Honore, furnished with masterpieces of French Empire furniture and decorative arts, English silver, and paintings by British artists, remains a splendid, but hard-working setting for promoting the Franco-British relationship.

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