ACCOMMODATION IN CHRISTCHURCH : IN CHRISTCHURCH

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Accommodation In Christchurch


accommodation in christchurch
    accommodation
  • Lodging; room and board
  • a settlement of differences; "they reached an accommodation with Japan"
  • The available space for occupants in a building, vehicle, or vessel
  • in the theories of Jean Piaget: the modification of internal representations in order to accommodate a changing knowledge of reality
  • adjustment: making or becoming suitable; adjusting to circumstances
  • A room, group of rooms, or building in which someone may live or stay
    christchurch
  • industrial city at the center of a rich agricultural region
  • A city in New Zealand, on the eastern coast of South Island; pop. 303,400
  • Christchurch (Otautahi) is the largest city in the South Island of New Zealand, and the country's second-largest urban area. It lies one third of the way down the South Island's east coast, just north of Banks Peninsula which itself, since 2006, lies within the formal limits of Christchurch.
  • Christchurch was a parliamentary electorate in Christchurch, New Zealand. It existed three times. Originally it was the Town of Christchurch from 1853 to 1860. From the 1860-61 election to the 1871 election, it existed as City of Christchurch.

THE TREGONWELL ARMS. OLD CHRISTCHURCH RD. BOURNEMOUTH. DORSET. 1809 - 1885 [ seen here in 1883 ]
THE TREGONWELL ARMS. OLD CHRISTCHURCH RD. BOURNEMOUTH. DORSET. 1809 - 1885 [ seen here in 1883 ]
The long winded explanation......... Very briefly, to set the scene, at the beginning of the 1800s the land that Bournemouth now occupies was a largely uninhabited heathland that lay between the much older towns of Christchurch and Poole, themselves not the large towns they are today. Technically the vast majority of the land now occupied by the town centre and it's surrounds, was owned by the Lord of the Manor of Christchurch, Sir George Tapps. But as the land was endowed with certain rights that allowed commoners to gather fuel for their homes and to graze their livestock it meant that the land had to remain as heath. At the end of the 1700s the Government was keen to see various types of common land across the country freed up in the hope that it could be farmed to produce more food. As a result a large number of Inclosure Acts came into force across the country, including the 'Christchurch Inclosure Act 1802', that enclosed the heath that lay between Christchurch and Poole aswell as land along the more fertile Stour Valley to the north and east. The Act covered a wider area, but the area that concerns historians of Bournemouth is that part that covers the Liberty of Westover, basically the land to the west of the Stour across to Alum Chine and inland to Redhill. This covers the land now occupied by modern day Bournemouth, with the exception of Kinson. The enclosed land was parcelled up into plots called allotments and a team of commissioners shared out these various sized allotments to those individuals that held rights over what was now the newly enclosed land. Not suprisingly Sir George Tapps was given the largest amount of land in the 'Christchurch Inclosure Act Awards 1805', Not far behind Sir George was William Dean of Littledown House, and thirdly the Earl of Malmesbury of Heron [Hurn] Court. There were many others awarded various amounts of land, some was set aside to remain as common land, a sizeable amount was put up for sale to cover the costs of implementing the Christchurch Inclosure Act and the resulting Awards, which gave the likes of Sir George and William Dean an opportunity to further increase their estates. So, in 1805, what had been common heathland with no outright owner, was now made up of various sized estates and plots with a variety of owners now free to do what they wished with their share. Notwithstanding the more fertile Stour Valley, the majority of the land was heath, the soil of which wasn't very fertile and therefore unsuitable for growing agricultural crops. It would seem that, initially at least, no one had a plan to build on the land, but Sir George Tapps did set about planting his land with vast amounts of pine trees. They grew well in the sandy soil, and could be harvested in the future for use in the mining and construction industries, therefore giving an alternative crop to the more conventional wheat and barley that wouldn't grow in the poor soil. Right, all of this waffle almost brings us to the above image......almost. At the time of the 'Christchurch Inclosure Act 1802' and the Awards of 1805, there were very few properties on the heath between Christchurch and Poole. On the more fertile Stour Valley around the north and eastern edge of the heath were the old settlements of Wick, Iford, Holdenhurst, Throop and Muccleshell, but on the heath itself just a handful of properties existed, they were.... Stourfield House built in 1766 at the edge of the heath in, what is today, Pokesdown. Boscombe Cottage that stood where Shelley Manor now stands in Beechwood Ave, usually stated as having been built in 1801, although it's roots lie earlier than that. A pair of semi detached cottages, Bourne House / Decoy Pond Cottage, or variations thereof, that stood where Debenhams now stands in The Square. It's origins are unknown, but it was standing in the mid 1700s and probably dates from around this time. Littledown House, built around 1790, that stood between the edge of the heath and the Stour Valley.. The first building built after the Inclosure Act was the Tapps Arms in 1809, on what was the main track used to travel between Poole and Christchurch. Apart from the nearby Bourne House / Decoy Pond Cottage that stood where Debenham's now stands in The Square, the area was very remote, which begs the question, why was a public house built here? Was it to facilitate the smugglers that had been carrying out their illegal activities along the area's isolated coastline for many years ? Were there enough passing travellers to make the inn financially viable, perhaps offering accommodation as well as food and drink to those crossing the heath, and to those from nearby villages in the area to enjoy a day at the coast, maybe to enjoy a picnic and to do a bit of skinny dipping ? Although seabathing would later become popular with Victorian society, a dip in the sea without all the rules and regulations demanded by the Victorians must surely have been popular throughout the p
THE TREGONWELL ARMS. OLD CHRISTCHURCH RD. BOURNEMOUTH. 1809 - 1855.
THE TREGONWELL ARMS. OLD CHRISTCHURCH RD. BOURNEMOUTH. 1809 - 1855.
The Tapps Arms was built in 1809, on what was then a very remote spot on the heath that lay between Christchurch and Poole, but what is now the entrance to Post Office Rd in Old Christchurch Rd, some 100 yards up from The Square. The Tapps Arms was rebuilt as the Tregonwell Arms in 1812, and became a receiving office for letters and postal items in 1839 whilst still an inn. It was demolished in 1885 having spent the last year of it's life as the Blue Ribbon Temperance Coffee Tavern. The building to the left is the methodist chapel that was a forerunner to the Punshon Methodist Church that was built on Richmond Hill in 1886. The long winded explanation......... Very briefly, to set the scene, at the beginning of the 1800s the land that Bournemouth now occupies was a largely uninhabited heathland that lay between the much older towns of Christchurch and Poole, themselves not the large towns they are today. Technically the vast majority of the land now occupied by the town centre and it's surrounds, was owned by the Lord of the Manor of Christchurch, Sir George Tapps. But as the land was endowed with certain rights that allowed commoners to gather fuel for their homes and to graze their livestock it meant that the land had to remain as heath. At the end of the 1700s the Government was keen to see various types of common land across the country freed up in the hope that it could be farmed to produce more food. As a result a large number of Inclosure Acts came into force across the country, including the 'Christchurch Inclosure Act 1802', that enclosed the heath that lay between Christchurch and Poole aswell as land along the more fertile Stour Valley to the north and east. The Act covered a wider area, but the area that concerns historians of Bournemouth is that part that covers the Liberty of Westover, basically the land to the west of the Stour across to Alum Chine and inland to Redhill. This covers the land now occupied by modern day Bournemouth, with the exception of Kinson. The enclosed land was parcelled up into plots called allotments and a team of commissioners shared out these various sized allotments to those individuals that held rights over what was now the newly enclosed land. Not suprisingly Sir George Tapps was given the largest amount of land in the 'Christchurch Inclosure Act Awards 1805', Not far behind Sir George was William Dean of Littledown House, and thirdly the Earl of Malmesbury of Heron [Hurn] Court. There were many others awarded various amounts of land, some was set aside to remain as common land, a sizeable amount was put up for sale to cover the costs of implementing the Christchurch Inclosure Act and the resulting Awards, which gave the likes of Sir George and William Dean an opportunity to further increase their estates. So, in 1805, what had been common heathland with no outright owner, was now made up of various sized estates and plots with a variety of owners now free to do what they wished with their share. Notwithstanding the more fertile Stour Valley, the majority of the land was heath, the soil of which wasn't very fertile and therefore unsuitable for growing agricultural crops. It would seem that, initially at least, no one had a plan to build on the land, but Sir George Tapps did set about planting his land with vast amounts of pine trees. They grew well in the sandy soil, and could be harvested in the future for use in the mining and construction industries, therefore giving an alternative crop to the more conventional wheat and barley that wouldn't grow in the poor soil. Right, all of this waffle almost brings us to the above image......almost. At the time of the 'Christchurch Inclosure Act 1802' and the Awards of 1805, there were very few properties on the heath between Christchurch and Poole. On the more fertile Stour Valley around the north and eastern edge of the heath were the old settlements of Wick, Iford, Holdenhurst, Throop and Muccleshell, but on the heath itself just a handful of properties existed, they were.... Stourfield House built in 1766 at the edge of the heath in, what is today, Pokesdown. Boscombe Cottage that stood where Shelley Manor now stands in Beechwood Ave, usually stated as having been built in 1801, although it's roots lie earlier than that. A pair of semi detached cottages, Bourne House / Decoy Pond Cottage, or variations thereof, that stood where Debenhams now stands in The Square. It's origins are unknown, but it was standing in the mid 1700s and probably dates from around this time. Littledown House, built around 1790, that stood between the edge of the heath and the Stour Valley.. The first building built after the Inclosure Act was the Tapps Arms in 1809, on what was the main track used to travel between Poole and Christchurch. Apart from the nearby Bourne House / Decoy Pond Cottage that stood where Debenham's now stands in The Square, the area was very remote, which begs the question, why was a public house built here?

accommodation in christchurch
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