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  • (Criminal lawyer) A criminal defense lawyer is a lawyer specializing in the defense of individuals and companies charged with criminal conduct. Criminal defense lawyers can be permanently employed by the various jurisdictions with criminal courts. Such lawyers are often called public defenders.
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  • (in solmization) The sixth note of a major scale
  • lanthanum: a white soft metallic element that tarnishes readily; occurs in rare earth minerals and is usually classified as a rare earth
  • the syllable naming the sixth (submediant) note of a major or minor scale in solmization
  • Louisiana: a state in southern United States on the Gulf of Mexico; one of the Confederate states during the American Civil War
  • The note A in the fixed-do system
la criminal lawyers - THE CRIMINAL
THE CRIMINAL LAWYER
THE CRIMINAL LAWYER
Set mainly in the City of London, Hillgate's second novel drags us into a Grisham-like world of corruption and greed where anything can be achieved via the payment of cold hard cash. Hillgate's protagonist, Jonathan Berrie, is a mild-mannered, run-of-the-mill criminal barrister desperately trying to assuage his wife's yearning for her old banking job at the monolithian US investment house Silverman Bach. With her old boss, Master of the universe Chas Mullion, literally rubbing his money in Jonathan's face, it's only a matter of time before Jonathan begins to crack.

Jonathan's dream is to live in a house in the South of France with a happy and contented family. The reality is that he represents the detritus of society in his day-job and earns less than his clerk, who, Jonathan laments, hasn't even been to university.

A new case takes him down a new road involving more money than he could ever imagine and more danger than he could ever want. Jonathan's new dilemma is how much is going to be enough?

Jack Hillgate's first novel, The Jew with the Iron Cross, is a UK bestseller.

Set mainly in the City of London, Hillgate's second novel drags us into a Grisham-like world of corruption and greed where anything can be achieved via the payment of cold hard cash. Hillgate's protagonist, Jonathan Berrie, is a mild-mannered, run-of-the-mill criminal barrister desperately trying to assuage his wife's yearning for her old banking job at the monolithian US investment house Silverman Bach. With her old boss, Master of the universe Chas Mullion, literally rubbing his money in Jonathan's face, it's only a matter of time before Jonathan begins to crack.

Jonathan's dream is to live in a house in the South of France with a happy and contented family. The reality is that he represents the detritus of society in his day-job and earns less than his clerk, who, Jonathan laments, hasn't even been to university.

A new case takes him down a new road involving more money than he could ever imagine and more danger than he could ever want. Jonathan's new dilemma is how much is going to be enough?

Jack Hillgate's first novel, The Jew with the Iron Cross, is a UK bestseller.

85% (16)
John Thaw 1942 - 2002
John Thaw 1942 - 2002
Compelling character actor who made his name on both sides of the law The actor John Thaw, who has died at the age of 60, made exemplary use of the great opportunities offered by television drama in its heyday. Over a span of 35 years, he starred in five very different, very popular, series related to law and order - in the course of which he ascended in status from military policeman to QC - while also gracing some of the most memorable single plays of the era. To each of these roles, plus others on the stage or cinema screen, he brought a massive presence, craggy features which could register determination or doubt with equal facility, and a familiar but subtly modulated voice. When some years ago, the National Film Theatre asked me to choose a double bill of the best in TV drama, I reached first for Dinner At The Sporting Club, Leon Griffiths' 1978 play about young boxers slugging each other for the entertainment of dinner-jacketed toffs as they tucked into the filet mignon. Thaw was the human, fallible, but ultimately courageous, manager of one of the boys - and this was when he was at the height of his renown in the toughest of his police series, The Sweeney. Born in Manchester and educated at Ducie technical high school, Thaw trained for the stage at Rada, and made his professional entrance at Liverpool Playhouse in 1960. His television debut the following year was as a member of Granada's anthology series, The Younger Generation, in which a stock company of raw young actors - Thaw was only 19 - performed original plays by equally raw young writers, among them Maureen Duffy, Adrian Mitchell and Robert Holles. Redcap, in which Thaw played a sergeant in the special investigation branch - the military police equivalent of the CID - was dreamed up by a Daily Mirror journalist, Jack Bell, though the scripts were the responsibility of Ian Kennedy Martin. It was produced by ABC Television for the Midlands and north of England regions, which ABC served. From 1965, however, it was fully networked. Thaw's next crime series, Thick As Thieves (1974), by Dick Clement and Ian la Frenais, is perhaps the joker in the pack, in that it was a situation comedy rather than a drama series, though a superior example of that form, exploring the pains of a precarious menage a trois. In his only role on the wrong side of the law, Thaw played a crook who has settled down cosily with the wife of an accomplice (Bob Hoskins) still in prison, whereupon the latter is released on parole. The same year, Thaw's old colleagues at ABC - by then the dominant partner in Thames Television - came up with an early, one-off TV movie, Regan, with Thaw as a tough, criminal-hating Flying Squad detective inspector. As they had doubtless intended, it was so successful that a full series followed in 1975-76 under the title The Sweeney, derived from cockney rhyming slang (Flying Squad/ Sweeney Todd). With Denis Waterman and Garfield Morgan as, respectively, Regan's detective sergeant and his scratchy superior, it ran to no fewer than 52 episodes, plus two feature films, Sweeney! (1977) and Sweeney 2 (1978). Action was everything in The Sweeney; perhaps the most enduring single image Thaw will have left behind is that of Regan pounding across some north London car lot in the chase sequence that climaxed every story. The contrast between this policeman and Thaw's next characterisation, that of the reclusive real-ale enthusiast and music-lover who lent his name to the intermittent series (from 1987) of Inspector Morse mysteries, could hardly have been more pronounced. The stories were adapted from Colin Dexter's novels set in Oxford, where deep thought was to be expected, and usually occupied a full two hours of screentime. In real life, as the writer of the rival Prime Suspect canon, Lynda La Plante, meanly pointed out, such a grizzled figure would have long been retired but, in many ways, Morse was the John Thaw character the television audience took most to heart. Enormous curiosity built up when Dexter promised, in his next book, to reveal his hero's first name. It was Endeavour. Finally, in the forensic line, came Kavanagh QC, with Thaw as our television's fourth long-running criminal lawyer, his predecessors being Boyd QC back in the 1950s, the irrepressible Rumpole and the Scottish procurator-fiscal of Sutherland's Law. Again intermittently, it was still popping up in the new century, with - in the last instalment to be seen before Thaw's announcement last year that he had cancer of the oesophagus - the teasing possibility that Kavanagh might become a judge. In real life, Thaw was awarded the CBE in 1993. Meanwhile, other distinguished performances continued. In the theatre, he played Professor Higgins in a revival of Pygmalion in 1984, and Joe Keller in Arthur Miller's All My Sons the following year. The Absence Of War brought him back to the National Theatre in 1993. His later films included Cry Freedom (1987), and Charlie
Alejandra Matus
Alejandra Matus
Refugees from Latin America in a transit center in Argentina UNHCR/ J.Becket/ 1977 Alejandra Matus Award-winning Chilean journalist Alejandra Matus won instant notoriety with her devastating expose of corruption, "El libro negro de la justicia chilena" ("The Black Book of Chilean Justice"), which was banned in Chile. To avoid arrest, she fled to Miami, where she now lives in exile. After the US government granted her political asylum, she managed to defy her government's ban by making her book freely available on the Internet. She now works tirelessly to champion the cause of press freedom. The eldest of three children, Matus' life changed irrevocably at the age of seven. That year, her parents separated and a military coup led by General Augusto Pinochet overthrew the government of Salvador Allende. At the age of 17, Matus attended the Pontifical Catholic University of Santiago. Her journalistic career, which began with the opposition magazine Today during her college years, took her to Radio New World, for whom she covered Chile's ongoing transition to democracy. At the daily newspaper, La Epoca, she gained recognition for her investigation into the "Charly Case", the first case of espionage in the army under the democratically-elected government of Patricio Aylwin. In 1994, Matus uncovered corruption in the Military Hospital of Santiago and made the front page of La Epoca. But after the article was published, the army charged the newspaper with sedition, giving the paper no choice but to retract her article. This was her first encounter with censorship. Four years later, her article was vindicated when the generals she had named were prosecuted for corruption. But she resigned from La Epoca and began writing for La Nacion. In partnership with journalist Francisco Artaza, she wrote an investigative report on the 1976 Washington car-bomb assassinations of Chilean ambassador Orlando Letelier and his American assistant Ronni Moffit. Matus and Artaza were awarded the Ortega and Gasset Prize for their work, which then led to the publication of "Crime with Punishment", Matus' first journalistic book. Matus' steady rise to prominence in her field culminated in "The Black Book of Chilean Justice". While working at La Nacion and the daily La Tercera, she accumulated startling evidence of rampant corruption in the judiciary. She drew up a "history" of corruption in the legal arm of the government. "There has never been a truly independent judiciary in Chile, just a 'service' with no independence," she says. "This service's deference to the authorities of the military government's regime tragically resulted in its failure to protect the lives of hundreds of people." The six-year research project exposed a number of judges, disclosing corruption, miscarriage of justice and unsavoury behaviour, dating from the military regime to the current government. One of them, Judge Servando Jordan, brought legal action against her and her book. In April 1999, Matus returned from Miami, where she was a journalist in residence for the Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel, to attend the official launch of her book in Chile. The day after the book reached the stores, the police started confiscating all copies from bookstores throughout the country. Justice Jordan invoked an archaic but still valid national security law authorising him to ban the book, seize all copies and bring criminal action against Matus and her publisher. Matus' brother, a lawyer, telephoned her to warn her of the arrest warrant and urge her to leave Chile, or face up to five years in prison. Matus boarded a plane to Buenos Aires with her fiance and in spite of massive protests at home and abroad, she was forced to return to Miami. There, she was declared to be in contempt of court in Chile, and liable to immediate imprisonment if she returned. The United Statess granted Matus political asylum on October 2, 1999, making her the first Chilean to obtain asylum in the US since the end of the Pinochet regime. Human Rights Watch has honoured Matus with its Hellman-Hammet Award for persecuted writers.

la criminal lawyers
la criminal lawyers
Flame-out : From Prosecuting Jeffrey MacDonald to Serving Time to Serving Tables
Story of prosecution of Dr. Jeffrey MacDonald for the triple murders of his family. Subsequent fall from grace from the practice of law, diagnosis of severe depression, subsequent imprisonment, and later waiting tables in very public restaurant to survive. A story of how to survive extreme adversity...a real journey of faith.

Story of prosecution of Dr. Jeffrey MacDonald for the triple murders of his family. Subsequent fall from grace from the practice of law, diagnosis of severe depression, subsequent imprisonment, and later waiting tables in very public restaurant to survive. A story of how to survive extreme adversity...a real journey of faith.

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