ENGINEERED SUBFLOOR. ENGINEERED

Engineered Subfloor. Grp Floor Grating. Download Killing Floor Demo.

Engineered Subfloor


engineered subfloor
    engineered
  • Design and build (a machine or structure)
  • Skillfully or artfully arrange for (an event or situation) to occur
  • Modify (an organism) by manipulating its genetic material
  • a multi-layered wood flooring board comprising of a surface veneer of real wood, bonded to a central softwood core and a counter balancing backing of softwood.
  • Engineering is the discipline, art and profession of acquiring and applying scientific, mathematical, economic, social, and practical knowledge to design and build structures, machines, devices, systems, materials and processes that safely realize a solution to the needs of society.
  • Produced by engineering; designed and manufactured according to an engineering methodology
    subfloor
  • The floor structure supporting and underlying the visible flooring or other finishing surface such as a carpet
  • The foundation for a floor in a building
  • The framing components of a floor to include the sill plate, floor joists, and deck sheeting over which a finish floor is to be laid.
  • Boards or plywood laid on joists over which a finish floor is to be laid.
engineered subfloor - AcoustiCORK Quiet
AcoustiCORK Quiet Comfort Floating Wood and Laminate Flooring Cork Underlayment
AcoustiCORK Quiet Comfort Floating Wood and Laminate Flooring Cork Underlayment
--Offers the latest in floating floor underlayment technology. --All natural and sustainable product. --Unique wave texture allows the subfloor to "breathe"; greatly reducing the possibility of mold or mildew occurring between the underlayment and the subfloor. --Unique wave texture also provides improved step noise reduction and increased walking comfort. --Unlike many synthetic materials it has no residual odor. --Guaranteed to retain its original thickness, even after years of heavy use. --FSC Certified. --107.25 sqft roll --2.5 mm thickness

82% (6)
PA - Mill Run: Fallingwater - Stairs from West Terrace
PA - Mill Run: Fallingwater - Stairs from West Terrace
Fallingwater's cantilevered west bedroom terrace was designed directly into a large boulder, which raised it five steps, or more than three feet, above the second floor. Originally boxed openings were created in the subfloor to allow three existing trees to rise through, but the trees did not survive construction, and the openings were eventually paved over. The cantilevered terraces are key to the organization and experience of Fallingwater, uniting the indoor and outdoor space. The zig-zag adobe-style steps leading from the terrace outside the dressing room, or Edgar Kaufmann Sr.'s 2nd floor bedroom to Edgar Kaufmann Jr.'s study and bedroom in the third-floor penthouse are more form--architectural and even metaphorical--than function. They likely saw very little, if any, foot traffic and put needles stress on the terrace below. Fallingwater, sometimes referred to as the Edgar J. Kaufmann Sr. Residence or just the Kaufmann Residence, located within a 5,100-acre nature reserve 50 miles southeast of Pittsburgh, was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright and built between 1936 and 1939. Built over a 30-foot flowing waterfall on Bear Run in the Mill Run section of Stewart Township, Fayette County, Pennsylvania, the house served as a vacation retreat for the Kaufmann family including patriarch, Edgar Kaufmann Sr., was a successful Pittsburgh businessman and president of Kaufmann's Department Store, and his son, Edgar Kaufmann, Jr., who studied architecture briefly under Wright. Wright collaborated with staff engineers Mendel Glickman and William Wesley Peters on the structural design, and assigned his apprentice, Robert Mosher, as his permanent on-site representative throughout construction. Despite frequent conflicts between Wright, Kaufmann, and the construction contractor, the home and guesthouse were finally constructed at a cost of $155,000. Fallingwater was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1966. It was listed among the Smithsonian's 28 Places to See Before You Die. In a 1991 poll of members of the American Institute of Architects (AIA), it was voted "the best all-time work of American architecture." In 2007, Fallingwater was ranked #29 on the AIA 150 America's Favorite Architecture list. National Register #74001781 (1974)
PA - Mill Run: Fallingwater - Stairs to West Terrace
PA - Mill Run: Fallingwater - Stairs to West Terrace
Fallingwater's cantilevered west bedroom terrace was designed directly into a large boulder, which raised it five steps, or more than three feet, above the second floor. Originally boxed openings were created in the subfloor to allow three existing trees to rise through, but the trees did not survive construction, and the openings were eventually paved over. The cantilevered terraces are key to the organization and experience of Fallingwater, uniting the indoor and outdoor space. Fallingwater, sometimes referred to as the Edgar J. Kaufmann Sr. Residence or just the Kaufmann Residence, located within a 5,100-acre nature reserve 50 miles southeast of Pittsburgh, was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright and built between 1936 and 1939. Built over a 30-foot flowing waterfall on Bear Run in the Mill Run section of Stewart Township, Fayette County, Pennsylvania, the house served as a vacation retreat for the Kaufmann family including patriarch, Edgar Kaufmann Sr., was a successful Pittsburgh businessman and president of Kaufmann's Department Store, and his son, Edgar Kaufmann, Jr., who studied architecture briefly under Wright. Wright collaborated with staff engineers Mendel Glickman and William Wesley Peters on the structural design, and assigned his apprentice, Robert Mosher, as his permanent on-site representative throughout construction. Despite frequent conflicts between Wright, Kaufmann, and the construction contractor, the home and guesthouse were finally constructed at a cost of $155,000. Fallingwater was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1966. It was listed among the Smithsonian's 28 Places to See Before You Die. In a 1991 poll of members of the American Institute of Architects (AIA), it was voted "the best all-time work of American architecture." In 2007, Fallingwater was ranked #29 on the AIA 150 America's Favorite Architecture list. National Register #74001781 (1974)

engineered subfloor
engineered subfloor
Genetically Engineered Food: A Self-Defense Guide for Consumers
Stormy debates about genetically engineered (GE) food have raged throughout the world in recent years, and the issue is now more potent than ever. Seventy to eighty percent of processed foods now sold in supermarkets contain genetically engineered ingredients, and the trend is growing at a startling rate. This second, completely revised edition of Genetically Engineered Food is an all-in-one guide written specifically to help consumers educate themselves about the risks posed by GE foods. Ronnie Cummins and Ben Lilliston, both leading consumer advocates, provide comprehensive, up-to-the-minute, action-inspiring information, including how to identify GE foods, products to avoid, brands that are GE-free, and how to shop and act with a purpose. They discuss all of the ethical, environmental, and health arguments against GE food, how these foods are being regulated in the United States and abroad, and why consumers are right to oppose them. Genetically Engineered Foods is the first and still one of the few consumer-oriented guides addressing this important subject.

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