OCTAGON END TABLE - END TABLE

Octagon end table - Black and cherry coffee table - Making wood table

Octagon End Table


octagon end table
    end table
  • A table is a type of furniture comprising an open, flat surface supported by a base or legs. It may be used to hold articles such as food or papers at a convenient or comfortable height when sitting, and is therefore often used in conjunction with chairs.
  • (End tables) are small tables typically placed beside couches or armchairs. Often lamps will be placed on an end table.
  • (End tables) Usually bought in pairs, they accent the style of the coffee table or other furniture. Usually placed at the end of the sofa, it is a very important piece of a living room set.
    octagon
  • In geometry, an octagon (from the Greek okto, eight ) is a polygon that has eight sides. A regular octagon is represented by the Schlafli symbol {8}.
  • An object or building with a plan or cross section of this shape
  • an eight-sided polygon
  • Octagon (Real name unknown, born March 27, 1961) is a Mexican Luchador Enmascarado (Masked Professional Wrestler) currently with Asistencia Asesoria y Administracion (AAA), having worked for the company since it was founded in 1992.
  • A plane figure with eight straight sides and eight angles
octagon end table - Plantation Cherry
Plantation Cherry Octagon Accent Table
Plantation Cherry Octagon Accent Table
5015024 Plantation Cherry represents Butler's tribute to tradition... to the classics of Western culture... from the timeless 18th century designs of Chippendale, Sheraton and Hepplewhite, to the best furniture in the finest homes when Americans declared their independence. Examine closely the fine woods, veneers, inlays and finishes of the Plantation Cherry Collection. Features: -Octagon accent table. -Plantation Cherry collection. -Plantation cherry finish. -Eight way matched cherry veneer top with raised border. -Fluted post columns. Specifications: -Wood construction. -Overall dimensions: 26.75'' H x 22.25'' W x 22.25'' D.

75% (8)
Octagon Tower, Roosevelt Island
Octagon Tower, Roosevelt Island
Roosevelt Island The Octagon, located at the northern end of Roosevelt Island, served as the administrative center and main entrance hall of the New York City Lunatic Asylum, one of the first institutions of its kind established in this country. Designs for the Asylum were prepared in 1834-35 by the acted New York architect, Alexander Jackson Davis, and the building was opened in 1839. Davis' plans called for a much more elaborate scheme than was actually built by the City; the Octagon was to have been one of a pair within a great U-shaped complex, ordered around a central rectangular pavilion. As built, the single Octagon, from which two long wings extended, became the focal point of the building. Much admired in the 19th century for its architectural excellence, the Octagon now stands alone, the imposing geometric clarity and simplicity of its design fully revealed. The City of New York purchased Blackwell's Island, as Roosevelt Island was called, in the 19th century, in 1828 with a view to institutional development; it was believe that the pleasant island surroundings would be conducive to both physical and mental rehabilitation. The island Penitentiary was begun in 1829, and the Lunatic Asylum was constructed at the end of the following decade. An Almshouse, Workhouse, and numerous charity hospitals were also built on Blackwell's Island during the course of the century, The Lunatic Asylum was erected in response to the desperate need for proper accomodation of the insane. Previously, these cases had been assigned to a few overcrowded and poorly maintained wards in Bellevue Hospital, In the middle years of the 19th century, the attitude towards the treatment and care of the insane underwent significant and progressive change. Recognition that they required medical assistance, not merely custodial restraint, led to the founding of such institutions as the New York City Lunatic Asylum. That this change in. attitude was, however, only gradually accomplished is well demonstrated by the fact that, in the early years of the Lunatic Asylum, patients were supervised by inmates from the Penitentiary under the direction of a small medical staff. The physicians in charge deplored this situation, and a suitable staff of orderlies and nurses was finally hired in 1850. Physical activity and labor as well as entertainment were prescribed as therapeutic for mental disturbances. Thus, the male patients of the lunatic Asylum who were willing and able, worked in vegetable gardens or built sea walls in order to reclaim land, while female patients aided in housekeeping chores and worked as seamstresses. A library—for the most part the result of donations from publishing houses and private citizens-- •• was formed, and weekly dances were held. At the recommendation of a resident physician, even a billiard table was purchased. The Asylum was, however, plagued with difficulties, primarily due to overcrowding and financial inadequacies. In the early years the diet of the patients was inadequate, and scurvy was a relatively common disease. Typhus and cholera epidemics afflicted the patients and staff alike in the 1860s. When Charles Dickens visited the United States in 1842, he was taken on a tour of the Black-well's Island Lunatic Asylum where he much admired the architecture, calling the building "handsome" and the Octagon an especially "elegant" feature; but he further commented in his American Notes (1842): "... everything (at the Asylum) had a lounging, listless, madhouse air which was very painful." Through the perseverance of the resident physicians and other concerned New Yorkers, conditions were gradually improved. Additional buildings were constructed to ease overcrowding and to separate violent patients from less serious cases. The facilities in general were made more pleasant and comfortable. By 1875 a contributor to Harper's Weekly magazine was able to write that "very few sane persons inhabit more healthy and convenient chambers." In 1894 it had been determined that municipal facilities could no longer adequately care for the great numbers of indigent insane. Ward's Island also in the Hast River was consequently ceded to the State of New York, and all New York City mental patients were transferred to hospitals there. The Lunatic Asylum was renamed Metropolitan Hospital and became a general hospital with special emphasis on the treatment of tubercular patients. In the 1950s the buildings on the island were abandoned for new quarters in Manhattan. By the late 1960s the island redevelopment project of the New York State Urban Development Corporation, threatened the old Asylum with demolition. Fortunately it was decided, on the basis of. recommendations made by the Landmarks Preservation Commission and a report prepared by the noted architectural historian, Henry-Russell Hitchcock, to preserve the central Octagon, Demolition of the two wings which projecte
Octagon Tower, Roosevelt Island
Octagon Tower, Roosevelt Island
Roosevelt Island, Manhattan, New York City The Octagon, located at the northern end of Roosevelt Island, served as the administrative center and main entrance hall of the New York City Lunatic Asylum, one of the first institutions of its kind established in this country. Designs for the Asylum were prepared in 1834-35 by the acted New York architect, Alexander Jackson Davis, and the building was opened in 1839. Davis' plans called for a much more elaborate scheme than was actually built by the City; the Octagon was to have been one of a pair within a great U-shaped complex, ordered around a central rectangular pavilion. As built, the single Octagon, from which two long wings extended, became the focal point of the building. Much admired in the 19th century for its architectural excellence, the Octagon now stands alone, the imposing geometric clarity and simplicity of its design fully revealed. The City of New York purchased Blackwell's Island, as Roosevelt Island was called, in the 19th century, in 1828 with a view to institutional development; it was believe that the pleasant island surroundings would be conducive to both physical and mental rehabilitation. The island Penitentiary was begun in 1829, and the Lunatic Asylum was constructed at the end of the following decade. An Almshouse, Workhouse, and numerous charity hospitals were also built on Blackwell's Island during the course of the century, The Lunatic Asylum was erected in response to the desperate need for proper accomodation of the insane. Previously, these cases had been assigned to a few overcrowded and poorly maintained wards in Bellevue Hospital, In the middle years of the 19th century, the attitude towards the treatment and care of the insane underwent significant and progressive change. Recognition that they required medical assistance, not merely custodial restraint, led to the founding of such institutions as the New York City Lunatic Asylum. That this change in. attitude was, however, only gradually accomplished is well demonstrated by the fact that, in the early years of the Lunatic Asylum, patients were supervised by inmates from the Penitentiary under the direction of a small medical staff. The physicians in charge deplored this situation, and a suitable staff of orderlies and nurses was finally hired in 1850. Physical activity and labor as well as entertainment were prescribed as therapeutic for mental disturbances. Thus, the male patients of the lunatic Asylum who were willing and able, worked in vegetable gardens or built sea walls in order to reclaim land, while female patients aided in housekeeping chores and worked as seamstresses. A library—for the most part the result of donations from publishing houses and private citizens-- •• was formed, and weekly dances were held. At the recommendation of a resident physician, even a billiard table was purchased. The Asylum was, however, plagued with difficulties, primarily due to overcrowding and financial inadequacies. In the early years the diet of the patients was inadequate, and scurvy was a relatively common disease. Typhus and cholera epidemics afflicted the patients and staff alike in the 1860s. When Charles Dickens visited the United States in 1842, he was taken on a tour of the Black-well's Island Lunatic Asylum where he much admired the architecture, calling the building "handsome" and the Octagon an especially "elegant" feature; but he further commented in his American Notes (1842): "... everything (at the Asylum) had a lounging, listless, madhouse air which was very painful." Through the perseverance of the resident physicians and other concerned New Yorkers, conditions were gradually improved. Additional buildings were constructed to ease overcrowding and to separate violent patients from less serious cases. The facilities in general were made more pleasant and comfortable. By 1875 a contributor to Harper's Weekly magazine was able to write that "very few sane persons inhabit more healthy and convenient chambers." In 1894 it had been determined that municipal facilities could no longer adequately care for the great numbers of indigent insane. Ward's Island also in the Hast River was consequently ceded to the State of New York, and all New York City mental patients were transferred to hospitals there. The Lunatic Asylum was renamed Metropolitan Hospital and became a general hospital with special emphasis on the treatment of tubercular patients. In the 1950s the buildings on the island were abandoned for new quarters in Manhattan. By the late 1960s the island redevelopment project of the New York State Urban Development Corporation, threatened the old Asylum with demolition. Fortunately it was decided, on the basis of. recommendations made by the Landmarks Preservation Commission and a report prepared by the noted architectural historian, Henry-Russell Hitchcock, to preserve the central Octagon, Demolition of th

octagon end table
Comments