DINING TABLE CONSTRUCTION - TABLE CONSTRUCTION

DINING TABLE CONSTRUCTION - CHILD FOLDING TABLE.

Dining Table Construction


dining table construction
    dining table
  • A table on which meals are served in a dining room
  • a table at which meals are served; "he helped her clear the dining table"; "a feast was spread upon the board"
  • A table is a type of furniture comprising an open, flat surface supported by a base or legs. It may be used to hold articles such as food or papers at a convenient or comfortable height when sitting, and is therefore often used in conjunction with chairs.
  • (Dining Tables) The first dining tables of which survivors remain are the type known as refectory tables. They are made usually of oak, and one of the earliest, at Penshurst Place in Kent, has a typical thick top of joined planks supported on three separate trestles.
    construction
  • The building of something, typically a large structure
  • Such activity considered as an industry
  • The style or method used in the building of something
  • a group of words that form a constituent of a sentence and are considered as a single unit; "I concluded from his awkward constructions that he was a foreigner"
  • the act of constructing something; "during the construction we had to take a detour"; "his hobby was the building of boats"
  • the creation of a construct; the process of combining ideas into a congruous object of thought
dining table construction - Constructive Eating
Constructive Eating Utensil Set
Constructive Eating Utensil Set
Constructive Eating's Fork Lift Fork, Bull Dozer Pusher, and Front Loader Spoon are designed with function and play value in mind. Textured, easy grip handles and detailing allow little hands to hold on tight. Even the youngest child will animate our construction machines with their true to life color, scale and shape. Our utensils can be used for every meal; each is rugged, light weight, and dishwasher safe. They are great when going out to eat, trying to extend productive eating time at the table, encouraging those not-so-favorite foods, or just for fun! Our utensils are made with FDA approved materials, contain no lead, are BPA free, PVC free, and phthalate free and are fully CPSIA compliant..

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PA - Mill Run: Fallingwater - Dining Alcove
PA - Mill Run: Fallingwater - Dining Alcove
Fallingwater's living room's northwest corner contains a dining alcove with a built-in dining table and credenza. The wooden dining room table, designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1939, uses the lighter lines of sapwood as a design element, bookmatching the flitches to create highlights. Additional tables folded into the adjacent buffet can more than double the 78?" length. The set of chairs at the dining table, late 19th century wooden Italian pesant chairs, were purchased by Mrs. Kaufman at a second hand shop in Florence. Wright had wanted to use his more formal Barrel Chair, but the family felt these rustic three-legged hand-carved chairs would evoke more of a casual charm appropriate for a mountain retreat. Titled Excursion, this portrait of Edgar Kaufmann Sr., hanging in Fallingwater's living room, was painted by Austrian-born American painter, Victor Hammer in 1929. Executed in egg tempera and oil, the portrait depicts Kaufmann as a confident outdoorsman, clutching a walking stick. Liliane Kaufmann commissioned this portrait from Hammer, whom she met in London, and it was exhibited in the 1930 Carnegie International. Fallingwater, sometimes referred to as the Edgar J. Kaufmann Sr. Residence or just the Kaufmann Residence, located within a 5,100-acre nature reserve 50 miles southeast of Pittsburgh, was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright and built between 1936 and 1939. Built over a 30-foot flowing waterfall on Bear Run in the Mill Run section of Stewart Township, Fayette County, Pennsylvania, the house served as a vacation retreat for the Kaufmann family including patriarch, Edgar Kaufmann Sr., was a successful Pittsburgh businessman and president of Kaufmann's Department Store, and his son, Edgar Kaufmann, Jr., who studied architecture briefly under Wright. Wright collaborated with staff engineers Mendel Glickman and William Wesley Peters on the structural design, and assigned his apprentice, Robert Mosher, as his permanent on-site representative throughout construction. Despite frequent conflicts between Wright, Kaufmann, and the construction contractor, the home and guesthouse were finally constructed at a cost of $155,000. Fallingwater was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1966. It was listed among the Smithsonian's 28 Places to See Before You Die. In a 1991 poll of members of the American Institute of Architects (AIA), it was voted "the best all-time work of American architecture." In 2007, Fallingwater was ranked #29 on the AIA 150 America's Favorite Architecture list. National Register #74001781 (1974)
PA - Mill Run: Fallingwater - Dining Alcove - Placesetting
PA - Mill Run: Fallingwater - Dining Alcove - Placesetting
Fallingwater's living room's northwest corner contains a dining alcove with a built-in dining table and credenza. The wooden dining room table, designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1939, uses the lighter lines of sapwood as a design element, bookmatching the flitches to create highlights. Additional tables folded into the adjacent buffet can more than double the 78?" length. The set of chairs at the dining table, late 19th century wooden Italian pesant chairs, were purchased by Mrs. Kaufman at a second hand shop in Florence. Wright had wanted to use his more formal Barrel Chair, but the family felt these rustic three-legged hand-carved chairs would evoke more of a casual charm appropriate for a mountain retreat. Fallingwater, sometimes referred to as the Edgar J. Kaufmann Sr. Residence or just the Kaufmann Residence, located within a 5,100-acre nature reserve 50 miles southeast of Pittsburgh, was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright and built between 1936 and 1939. Built over a 30-foot flowing waterfall on Bear Run in the Mill Run section of Stewart Township, Fayette County, Pennsylvania, the house served as a vacation retreat for the Kaufmann family including patriarch, Edgar Kaufmann Sr., was a successful Pittsburgh businessman and president of Kaufmann's Department Store, and his son, Edgar Kaufmann, Jr., who studied architecture briefly under Wright. Wright collaborated with staff engineers Mendel Glickman and William Wesley Peters on the structural design, and assigned his apprentice, Robert Mosher, as his permanent on-site representative throughout construction. Despite frequent conflicts between Wright, Kaufmann, and the construction contractor, the home and guesthouse were finally constructed at a cost of $155,000. Fallingwater was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1966. It was listed among the Smithsonian's 28 Places to See Before You Die. In a 1991 poll of members of the American Institute of Architects (AIA), it was voted "the best all-time work of American architecture." In 2007, Fallingwater was ranked #29 on the AIA 150 America's Favorite Architecture list. National Register #74001781 (1974)

dining table construction
dining table construction
Oxford Garden 48-Inch Round Shorea Dining Table
The classic round dining table measures 47.25" in diameter and makes a perfect match to either our Chadwick or Classic Arm Chairs or Side Chairs. To allow rain to pass through the table top is slatted. The four sturdy and untappered legs attach with solid hardware and a strongly built cross footing for extra support. If you choose to use an umbrella simply knock out the 1 & 5/8 inch diameter solid wood market umbrella plug. A low profile umbrella base is required to clear the cross bracing. This table is made of shorea, a teak family wood that is more dense and heavy than teak. Shorea requires no finishing and will not rot when left outdoors where rain and sun will damage other lesser quality woods. Left untreated, shorea will weather to a soft warm shade of gray similar to the weathering of teak. Sturdy mortise and tenon construction provides the highest quality joinery that will last for many years. Original color can be maintained by applying a seasonal coat of teak oil.

A combination of beautiful wood and structural smarts, the Oxford Garden Designs round dining table offers a great place to while away the hours at dinner, conversation, or card games. The four-legged design paired with a stout cross-footing creates a very stable structure. The top features a slatted center and eight rounded edge pieces, for an attractive play of line and grain. The center slat, wider than the others, features a 1-3/4-inch hole (fitted with a removable wooden plug) for holding an umbrella. The footing also has an umbrella hole for added stability. Crafted from shorea wood, a weighty, teak-like semihardwood from Indonesia, the table is highly resistant to rot and the elements. It also ages well, weathering to a soft, warm gray or maintaining its original color with periodic applications of teak oil. Like other Oxford Garden Designs pieces, the table is constructed with sturdy mortise and tenon joinery. It measures 47-1/4 inches in diameter and stands 28-5/8 inches high. Basic assembly is required, and the necessary stainless-steel and brass hardware is included. --Emily Bedard

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