WHITE PLANTATION BLINDS : WHITE PLANTATION

White plantation blinds : Tall shade shrubs.

White Plantation Blinds


white plantation blinds
    plantation
  • An estate on which crops such as coffee, sugar, and tobacco are cultivated by resident labor
  • A colony
  • an estate where cash crops are grown on a large scale (especially in tropical areas)
  • a newly established colony (especially in the colonization of North America); "the practice of sending convicted criminals to serve on the Plantations was common in the 17th century"
  • An area in which trees have been planted, esp. for commercial purposes
  • grove: garden consisting of a small cultivated wood without undergrowth
    blinds
  • Deprive (someone) of understanding, judgment, or perception
  • The blinds are forced bets posted by players to the left of the dealer button in flop-style poker games. The number of blinds is usually two, but can be one or three.
  • Cause (someone) to be unable to see, permanently or temporarily
  • A window blind is a type of window covering which is made with slats of fabric, wood, plastic or metal that adjust by rotating from an open position to a closed position by allowing slats to overlap. A roller blind does not have slats but comprises a single piece of material.
  • window coverings, especially vertical blinds, wood blinds, roller blinds, pleated blinds
  • Confuse or overawe someone with something difficult to understand
    white
  • Paint or turn (something) white
  • a member of the Caucasoid race
  • whiten: turn white; "This detergent will whiten your laundry"
  • being of the achromatic color of maximum lightness; having little or no hue owing to reflection of almost all incident light; "as white as fresh snow"; "a bride's white dress"
white plantation blinds - Blinds Bali
Blinds Bali Faux Wood Shutters EuroVue Shutters Faux Wood Cream White 1026
Blinds Bali Faux Wood Shutters EuroVue Shutters Faux Wood Cream White 1026
Blinds Bali Faux Wood Shutters EuroVue Shutters Faux Wood Cream White 1026 this Bali EuroVue Shutter is specifically designed for easy installation on drywall-wrapped windows. Like all EuroVue Shutters, it offers a cleaner look, a fuller view to the outside and a design that installs as easily as a blind. there is no visible hardware to distract from the appeal of the shutter, and a contemporary design with mitered corners makes the EuroVue Shutter look like part of the window. It's also free of obstructing frames, so just opening the louvers provides a fuller view to the outside.

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Popokotea - Whitehead (Mohoua albicilla)
Popokotea - Whitehead (Mohoua albicilla)
A small species ( 15 cm in length, 18.5/14.5 g.[1]) of passerine bird endemic to New Zealand. It is currently classified in the family Pachycephalidae and thus regarded as a relative of the whistlers in Australia and the unusual Pitohui, a genus of poisonous birds from New Guinea. The Male Whitehead's upperparts, wings and tail are a pale brown in colour, while the head and underparts an almost pure white in colour. Females and juveniles have similar colouration except that the nape and crown (top of the head) are shaded brown. The black beak and eyes contrast with the white head and the feet are bluish black. Formerly widespread in the North Island, the Whitehead has suffered a marked decline in the past two centuries since European colonisation and today is restricted to a fraction of its former range. It has been the subject of an active conservation campaign and has been successfully reintroduced into reserves near Auckland and Wellington respectively. Often encountered in small flocks comprising of family groups. The diet of Whiteheads is primarily insectivorous in nature - they are classed as arboreal insectivores. Their main prey are spiders, moths, caterpillars and beetles which are gleaned from tree trunks, leaves and branches in the canopy and subcanopy. They rarely feed on the forest floor. They will supplement their predominantly insectivorous diet with the fruits of native plants such as Mahoe and matipo and like the Yellowhead, they frequently hang upside down from branches or twigs while feeding. Whiteheads will often form mixed-species feeding flocks with Saddlebacks, kakariki or Silvereyes to catch the insects these birds dislodge as they feed. The range of this species has always been restricted to the North Island of New Zealand, as well as several offshore islands surrounding it, including Little Barrier Island (where it is the most common forest bird), Great Barrier Island and Kapiti Island; it has however, contracted markedly since the 19th century due to a number of human induced factors. The distributions of the Whitehead and its close relative, the Yellowhead are sympatric, with the range of the yellowhead restricted to the South Island. Whiteheads are generally restricted to the larger tracts of older scrub and native forest that remain in the North Island but have proven their adaptibility by establishing populations in a number of exotic pine plantations, particularly on the North Island Volcanic Plateau. Unlike the Yellowhead, which nests only in the cavities of tree trunks which are generally high up in the canopy, the Whitehead builds a more conventional cup shaped nest at a height between 1 and 15 metres above the ground; either in the canopy of the forest or lower down in smaller trees or shrubs. Between 2-4 eggs of variable colouration are laid, the incubation period is generally around 18 days and fledging takes a further 16-19, the chicks being fed by both parents. In November and December, the Long-tailed Cuckoo frequently acts as a brood parasite of nesting whiteheads by pushing their eggs out of the nest and laying a single egg of its own in their place. The Whitehead held a special place within Maori culture among the forest birds of New Zealand. They featured not only in Maori folklore and legends but also in a number of rites for which live individuals were captured. Flocks of Whiteheads form part of the hakuturi, a multitude of small birds sometimes called Te Tini o te Hakuturi - "The myriads of Hakuturi", the spirit guardians of the forest. In a Ngati Mahuta story, the culture hero Rata went into the forest and cut down a tree to make a canoe, but failed to perform the proper placatory rites to Tane, god of the forest. Whiteheads and Riflemen whistled shrilly at him in admonishment and gathered together the pieces of the tree until it stood whole again. This happened several times until Rata showed remorse and the birds felled the tree and made the canoe for him. In some stories, the Whitehead was one of several small birds chosen by Maui to accompany him in his (ultimately unsuccessful and fatal) quest to abolish death by killing Hine-nui-te-po, the goddess of night and death. The mobbing behaviour sometimes seen in Whiteheads is reflected in one legend which tells of swarms of Whiteheads scratching out the eyes of Whaitiri, goddess of thunder, as they pass her house, thus causing her to go blind. The Whitehead, as a messenger between man and the gods, was a very tapu (sacred) bird.[9] This status was reflected in its role in the tohi rite, a ritual performed over an infant. This entailed a tohunga touching the head of an infant with a live Whitehead and reciting a karakia (incantation) firstly to cause the mana (power and prestige) of the gods to descend on the child from the gods and secondly to open the child's eyes and ears to the knowledge of the ancestors. After the karakia was complete the bird was freed to demonstrate that the mana received wou
Maria Denis
Maria Denis
Italian postcard by Casa Editrice Ballerini & Fratini, Firenze, nr, 43090. Photo: Scalera Film/Pesce. Maria Denis (1916-2004) was one of the most popular stars of the Italian cinema under the Fascist rule.Very successful were her Telefoni Bianchi-films of the 1930?s. Charges of collaboration tarnished her career after the war. Controversial are her claims that she had not been the mistress of Nazi police chief Pietro Koch and just used his infatuation with her to help anti-fascists get released, especially film director Luchino Visconti. Maria Denis was born Maria Esther Beomonte in Buenos Aires, Argentina, in 1916. Her parents were Italian and her sister was the actress Michela Belmonte.Maria moved to Italy when she was 3 years old. She was still attending high school when, she was discovered for the cinema. At 16, she started her career with the film La telefonista (1932, Nunzio Malasomma). She then played a small part in the comedy Gli uomini, che mascalzoni!/What Rascals Men Are (1932, Mario Camerini), which launched Vittorio De Sica as a debonair film star. She played her first lead in Treno Popolare/Popular Train (1933, Raffaelo Matarazzo), a typical Italian-style comedy about Sunday train trippers from Rome to Orvieto. In 1934 she had her breakthrough with the film Seconda B/Second B (1934, Goffredo Alessandrini) as a flirtateous adolescent, who plays a cruel joke on her young professor. The film was a huge success and was followed by many more roles that made her a star of the Telefoni Bianchi-cinema: a typical Italian genre of bourgeois comedies with elegant sets that featured white telephones. She often appeared in the roles of foundling, chamber maid or young teacher, and worked with such famous Italian directors of the period as Guido Brignone, Mario Camerini and Alessandro Blasetti. For the latter, she appeared in 1860 (1934, Alessandro Blasetti), his film about Garibaldi's expedition, and in his Contessa Di Parma/ The Duchess of Parma (1937, Alessandro Blasetti). According to John Francis Lane, in his obituary of Denis in The Guardian, Blasetti mixed in this film”not very successfully, the worlds of soccer and fashion”. Another popular film of the “brunette with a perky Latin temperament” was the nostalgic musical Napoli d'altri tempi/Naples in the past (1938, Amleto Palermi) opposite Vittorio de Sica. During the war Maria Denis appeared with Fosco Giachetti in the Fascist propaganda film L'assedio dell'Alcazar/The Siege of Alcazar (1940, Augusto Genina), about the besieged inhabitants of the fascist citadel in Toledo during the Spanish civil war. She played a Spanish girl whose soldier boyfriend is killed during the fighting. The film won the Mussolini Cup, the top prize, at the 1940 Venice Film Festival, and one of the reviewers, who found much to praise in the film, including her performance, was Michelangelo Antonioni. Vey popular were Addio giovinezza!/Farewell, youth! (1940, Ferdinando Maria Poggioli) set among students in Turin, La maestrina/The schoolmarm (1942, Giorgio Bianchi) and Sissignora/Yes, Madam (1942, Ferdinando Maria Poggioli). Denis proved her versatility, when she played with great sensitivity and refinement a blind girl in Le due orfanelle/The Two Orphans (1942, Carmine Gallone) alongside Alida Valli. She also starred in foreign productions like the French film La vie de boheme/La Boheme (1942-1945, Marcel l'Herbier) opposite Louis Jourdan. At this time she met director Luchino Visconti and in her own words, she fell madly in love with the handsome, cultured aristocrat. When Anna Magnani had to pull out of what was to be his first film, Ossessione/Obsession (1942, Luchino Visconti), Maria hoped that she would get the part, but the director preferred Clara Calamai. Though probably aware of his homosexuality, Denis continued to pursue him. In 1944, during the Nazi occupation of Rome, she was linked to Pietro Koch, the notorious Roman police chief. In 1946, while she was shooting the film Cronaca Nero/Black Chronicle (1947, Giorgio Bianchi), Maria Denis was arrested as a collaborator and kept at the police headquarters in Rome for fourteen days. At her trial, she succeeded in convincing the court that she had only taken advantage of Koch's infatuation to help anti-fascists getting released, in particular Visconti. (Visconti had been arrested and imprisoned for political sympathies closely linked to the partisans). She was subsequently acquitted. Whether it was true or not that Mara Denis did in fact become Pietro Koch's lover either before or after Luchino Visconti?s arrest has never been confirmed. However her film career was tarnished and after the war she only found a few film parts, like in Peter Ustinov's Private Angelo (1949, Michael Anderson, Peter Ustinov), filmed on location in Tuscany. Disappointed and bitter, she decided to retire from the cinema. She married a businessman in 1953 and became an interior decorator. Her last appearance w

white plantation blinds
white plantation blinds
The Plantation
When Australian Julie Reagan discovers a book written about wild Malaysia in the 1970s, she decides to find out more about the author - her great aunt. Why did her grandmother refuse to speak about her sister who disappeared from the family, 60 years before? What caused such a severe rift? Julie is invited to stay with her cousins who run the plantation founded by her great grandfather in Malaya a hundred years ago, and she decides to visit in the hope of finding clues to this family mystery. What Julie finds sends her spiralling through generations of loves, deaths, tragedy and the challenges of the present until she discovers her grandmother's shocking secret.

When Australian Julie Reagan discovers a book written about wild Malaysia in the 1970s, she decides to find out more about the author - her great aunt. Why did her grandmother refuse to speak about her sister who disappeared from the family, 60 years before? What caused such a severe rift? Julie is invited to stay with her cousins who run the plantation founded by her great grandfather in Malaya a hundred years ago, and she decides to visit in the hope of finding clues to this family mystery. What Julie finds sends her spiralling through generations of loves, deaths, tragedy and the challenges of the present until she discovers her grandmother's shocking secret.

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