STAINED GLASS REPLACEMENT SHADES. REPLACEMENT SHADES

Stained glass replacement shades. Superior fiberglass deer blinds

Stained Glass Replacement Shades


stained glass replacement shades
    stained glass
  • glass that has been colored in some way; used for church windows
  • The term stained glass can refer to coloured glass as a material or to works made from it. Throughout its thousand-year history, the term has been applied almost exclusively to the windows of churches and other significant buildings.
  • Stained Glass is a 1978 Blackford Oakes novel by William F. Buckley, Jr. It is the second novel in the series.
  • Colored glass used to form decorative or pictorial designs, notably for church windows, both by painting and esp. by setting contrasting pieces in a lead framework like a mosaic
    replacement
  • The action or process of replacing someone or something
  • refilling: filling again by supplying what has been used up
  • A person or thing that takes the place of another
  • the act of furnishing an equivalent person or thing in the place of another; "replacing the star will not be easy"
  • substitution: an event in which one thing is substituted for another; "the replacement of lost blood by a transfusion of donor blood"
    shades
  • (shade) relative darkness caused by light rays being intercepted by an opaque body; "it is much cooler in the shade"; "there's too much shadiness to take good photographs"
  • (shade) shadow: cast a shadow over
  • Screen from direct light
  • Darken or color (an illustration or diagram) with parallel pencil lines or a block of color
  • sunglasses: spectacles that are darkened or polarized to protect the eyes from the glare of the sun; "he was wearing a pair of mirrored shades"
  • Cover, moderate, or exclude the light of
stained glass replacement shades - 18"W X
18"W X 10"H Faux Leather Tan Hexagon Replacement Shade
18"W X 10"H Faux Leather Tan Hexagon Replacement Shade
Meyda Tiffany 26355 18"w Tan Faux Leather Shade Every Meyda Tiffany item is a unique, handcrafted work of art. Natural variation in the glass and finish make each and every one a masterpiece all its own. Photographs are a general representation of the product. Colors will vary. Meyda Tiffany 26355 18"w Tan Faux Leather Shade Shade Dimensions: 18" w. x 10" h. This Handsome Dark Tan Faux Leather Lamp Shade Is Trimmed With Leather Like Lacings The Shade Has A Spider For Use On A Small Lamp And A White FabricLining For Added Light Reflection

86% (5)
Flatbush Dutch Reformed Church Parsonage
Flatbush Dutch Reformed Church Parsonage
Flatbush, Brooklyn, New York City, New York, United States The Parsonage of the Flatbush Dutch Reformed Church, which displays the forms of Greek Revival and Italianate architecture, is a handsome residential structure. Built in 1853, this is the third parsonage building to serve the ministers of the congregation. The Reformed Protestant Dutch Church of the Town of Flatbush in Kings County, a designated New York City Landmark, located at the southwest corner of Church and Flatbush Avenues in Brooklyn, has existed and functioned continuously for well over 300 years and has had 21 ministers during that time. In 1654, Director General Peter Stuyvesant ordered that a church be built in the new settlement of Flatbush. It was to be in the form of a cross, 65 feet long, 28 feet broad and 14 feet high under the beams, with a portion of the rear to be reserved for a dwelling for the minister. This church was the first of three to be erected on the same site. Dominie Johannes Theodorus Polhemus arrived in New Amsterdam in 1654 from Brazil where he had served the Dutch West India Company, and he was chosen to be the first minister of the Flatbush Dutch Reformed Church in 1655. He sent to Holland for his wife and family, and they resided in the quarters provided for them at the rear of the church. The first church building served until 1698, when' the congregation decided to build a larger church of stone. A separate parsonage was then built to the south of the new church and facing east on Flatbush Avenue. This building stood until 1853, when it was torn down. In 1822, the young and capable Reverend Thomas M. Strong was called to be the minister at the Flatbush Dutch Reformed Church. He was to serve for 39 years and was greatly loved and respected by his congregation. During the period March 23, 1823, to June 11, 1824, a new parsonage was built for Dr. Strong. It was located on the east side of Flatbush Avenue, north of the Erasmus Hall Academy.2 The building was constructed under contract with John Voorhees and Jeremiah Lambertsen for the sum of $1,549.00 plus $179.87 for extras not included in the contract.3 This parsonage was sold at public auction at the Merchant's Exchange in the City of New York on Monday October 10, 1853, for, ' by that date, Dr. Strang had moved into the new parsonage. The Parsonage of the Flatbush Dutch Reformed Church, a large and imposing wooden frame residence now located at 2101-2103 Kenmore Terrace, was built by-order of the Consistory, in 1853, south of the church and fronting on Flatbush Avenue after the original parsonage, built about 1699, was razed in order to clear the site. It was probably built by a master builder with considerable experience at a time of architectural transition from the Greek Revival style to the Italianate. This becomes evident as one examines the building. The Shape and form of the house are in the Greek Revival tradition of country houses two and one-half stories in height with four chimneys and a peaked roof, and five bays in width with a center hall. Yet, the architectural details and features which embellish it are all in the Italianate style. The roof cornice of the house has a wide frieze with rather large dentils and paired curvilinear brackets with returns at the gable ends. The porch, which in 1853 would have been called a veranda or a piazza, extends fully across the front of the house and along the east side. It has the same cornice design as the main roof but in somewhat smaller scale. The ten wooden columns which support the porch roof have fluted shafts and beautifully carved capitals in the Greek Corinthian style with acanthus leaves resting against a bell-shaped form, but without volutes. A railing of delicately turned wooden balusters connects the columns and encloses the porch. Originally, both the porch roof and the main roof of the house were edged with decorative paneled wooden railings which were later removed. The windows throughout the house now have one-over-one sashes, but an old photograph shews the originals to have been in the Italianate style with four-over-four sashes in imitation of casements. These windows still retain their exterior wooden louvered blinds. The parlor windows on either side of the front door are floor-length and were also four-over-four. The lintels above these windows are even smaller copies of the cornice of the porch. The front door has a three-light transom and flanking sidelights extending down to the floor. The transom and the sidelights are now filled with stained glass in stylized leaf patterns in various shades of blue. The front door is, no doubt, a replacement, being of quartered-oak and having a total of seven panels in a style papular at the turn of the century. The enframement, however, is original. It has a wide surround composed of several bold mouldings and has crossetted (eared) comers at the top which serve to delineate the architrave, directly above which is a frieze with de
Flatbush Dutch Reformed Church Parsonage
Flatbush Dutch Reformed Church Parsonage
Brooklyn, New York City, New York, United States of America The Parsonage of the Flatbush Dutch Reformed Church, which displays the forms of Greek Revival and Italianate architecture, is a handsome residential structure. Built in 1853, this is the third parsonage building to serve the ministers of the congregation. The Reformed Protestant Dutch Church of the Town of Flatbush in Kings County, a designated New York City Landmark, located at the southwest corner of Church and Flatbush Avenues in Brooklyn, has existed and functioned continuously for well over 300 years and has had 21 ministers during that time. In 1654, Director General Peter Stuyvesant ordered that a church be built in the new settlement of Flatbush. It was to be in the form of a cross, 65 feet long, 28 feet broad and 14 feet high under the beams, with a portion of the rear to be reserved for a dwelling for the minister. This church was the first of three to be erected on the same site. Dominie Johannes Theodorus Polhemus arrived in New Amsterdam in 1654 from Brazil where he had served the Dutch West India Company, and he was chosen to be the first minister of the Flatbush Dutch Reformed Church in 1655. He sent to Holland for his wife and family, and they resided in the quarters provided for them at the rear of the church. The first church building served until 1698, when' the congregation decided to build a larger church of stone. A separate parsonage was then built to the south of the new church and facing east on Flatbush Avenue. This building stood until 1853, when it was torn down. In 1822, the young and capable Reverend Thomas M. Strong was called to be the minister at the Flatbush Dutch Reformed Church. He was to serve for 39 years and was greatly loved and respected by his congregation. During the period March 23, 1823, to June 11, 1824, a new parsonage was built for Dr. Strong. It was located on the east side of Flatbush Avenue, north of the Erasmus Hall Academy.2 The building was constructed under contract with John Voorhees and Jeremiah Lambertsen for the sum of $1,549.00 plus $179.87 for extras not included in the contract.3 This parsonage was sold at public auction at the Merchant's Exchange in the City of New York on Monday October 10, 1853, for, ' by that date, Dr. Strang had moved into the new parsonage. The Parsonage of the Flatbush Dutch Reformed Church, a large and imposing wooden frame residence now located at 2101-2103 Kenmore Terrace, was built by-order of the Consistory, in 1853, south of the church and fronting on Flatbush Avenue after the original parsonage, built about 1699, was razed in order to clear the site. It was probably built by a master builder with considerable experience at a time of architectural transition from the Greek Revival style to the Italianate. This becomes evident as one examines the building. The Shape and form of the house are in the Greek Revival tradition of country houses two and one-half stories in height with four chimneys and a peaked roof, and five bays in width with a center hall. Yet, the architectural details and features which embellish it are all in the Italianate style. The roof cornice of the house has a wide frieze with rather large dentils and paired curvilinear brackets with returns at the gable ends. The porch, which in 1853 would have been called a veranda or a piazza, extends fully across the front of the house and along the east side. It has the same cornice design as the main roof but in somewhat smaller scale. The ten wooden columns which support the porch roof have fluted shafts and beautifully carved capitals in the Greek Corinthian style with acanthus leaves resting against a bell-shaped form, but without volutes. A railing of delicately turned wooden balusters connects the columns and encloses the porch. Originally, both the porch roof and the main roof of the house were edged with decorative paneled wooden railings which were later removed. The windows throughout the house now have one-over-one sashes, but an old photograph shews the originals to have been in the Italianate style with four-over-four sashes in imitation of casements. These windows still retain their exterior wooden louvered blinds. The parlor windows on either side of the front door are floor-length and were also four-over-four. The lintels above these windows are even smaller copies of the cornice of the porch. The front door has a three-light transom and flanking sidelights extending down to the floor. The transom and the sidelights are now filled with stained glass in stylized leaf patterns in various shades of blue. The front door is, no doubt, a replacement, being of quartered-oak and having a total of seven panels in a style papular at the turn of the century. The enframement, however, is original. It has a wide surround composed of several bold mouldings and has crossetted (eared) comers at the top which serve to delineate the architrave, directly above which is a frieze with d

stained glass replacement shades
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