ACCELERATED FLIGHT SCHOOLS. FLIGHT SCHOOLS

Accelerated flight schools. Flight planner software.

Accelerated Flight Schools


accelerated flight schools
    flight schools
  • (Flight School (GLC song)) Leonard D. Harris is an American rapper from Chicago.
    accelerated
  • Increase in amount or extent
  • (acceleration) an increase in rate of change; "modern science caused an acceleration of cultural change"
  • Undergo a change in velocity
  • (accelerate) move faster; "The car accelerated"
  • speeded up, as of an academic course; "in an accelerated program in school"
  • (of a vehicle or other physical object) Begin to move more quickly
accelerated flight schools - Taming Stalls
Taming Stalls and Spins (King Accelerated Schools)
Taming Stalls and Spins (King Accelerated Schools)
By viewing TAMING STALLS AND SPINS from King Acccelerated Schools you'll quickly learn what causes a stall... how it can transition to a spin... how to instantly recognize & avoid situations that might result in loss of control... & steps to take in the event you find yourself in a stalled condition. Dramatic in-flight video compellingly demonstrates the aerodynamics of stalls & spins during everyday flight. Understanding the nature of stalls and spins before you get in the cockpit makes it easier to recognize when you need to take action when you're in actual flight. A "must" for every pilot--regardless of your experience. "I feel I could recover from an accidental spin if needed... extremely good" (GR, Delano, CA).

86% (11)
PILOT OFFICER ERIC STANLEY LOCK DSO DFC & BAR
PILOT OFFICER ERIC STANLEY LOCK  DSO DFC & BAR
Battle of Britain Memorial Flights Spitfire MkIIa P7350 marked as Spitfire MkI N3162 EB-G as flown by Pilot Officer E S Lock DSO DFC & Bar ----------------------------- Eric Stanley Lock was born in 1919 to a farming and quarrying family, whose home was in the rural Shropshire village of Bayston Hill. He was privately educated at Prestfelde Public School, London Road, Shrewsbury. On his 14th birthday his father treated him to a five shilling, fifteen-minute flight with Sir Alan Cobham's Air Circus. At 16 he left school and joined his father's business. In 1939 he made the decision that if there was going to be a war, he wanted to be a fighter pilot, and so immediately joined the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve and learned to fly On the outbreak of World War II in September 1939, as a trained pilot Lock was immediately called up to the Royal Air Force as a Sergeant Pilot. After further training at No.6 Flying School RAF Little Rissington, he was commissioned as a Pilot Officer (Service Number 81642) and posted to No. 41 Squadron at RAF Catterick, North Yorkshire, flying Spitfires. In July 1940 Lock was granted a seven-day leave pass and returned to Bayston Hill to marry his childhood sweetheart, Peggy Meyers, a former Miss Shrewsbury. Operations from RAF Catterick were organised to defend the industrial assets of the north, as well as the transport hubs of the rivers Humber, Tees and Tyne. Being so far north they were out of reach of most Luftwaffe fighter patrols, bar the odd reconnaissance mission. However, although missing out on the fierce combat of the Battle of Britain, bomber campaigns from occupied Norway occurred from mid-1940 as the Germans tried to press home their attack. On 15 August 1940, Lock gained his first victory when he shot down a twin-engined Messerschmitt Bf 110 that was escorting a bomber formation at 20,000 feet (6,100 m). In light of RAF Fighter Command's dire need for pilots in the south of the country, No. 41 Squadron was redeployed to RAF Hornchurch in Essex on 3 September 1940. On 5 September, Lock shot down two Heinkel He 111s over the Thames Estuary. During the second attack he sustained damage to his Spitfire and injured his leg after being shot at by a German Messerschmitt Bf 109 fighter. After he saw the second Heinkel destroyed, Lock slipped and countered the Messerschmit's attack, and after two bursts of gun fire the Bf 109 exploded in mid-air. The following day, despite pain from his leg and against medical advice, Lock claimed his fifth victory, a Junkers 88 bomber, making him an ace. On 9 September 1940, Lock claimed another two Bf 109s, and on 11 September he destroyed another Ju 88 and a Bf 110. Having destroyed eight enemy aircraft in a week, Lock was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross (DFC), the award was gazetted on 1 October 1940 with a citation reading:- “This officer has destroyed nine enemy aircraft, eight of these within a period of one week. He has displayed great vigour and determination in pressing home his attacks” Lock continued to shoot enemy aircraft down regularly, including one that he pursued across the English Channel before finally downing it over the German gun batteries at Boulogne-sur-Mer. Only three weeks after receiving his first, he was awarded a Bar to his DFC, this time for reaching a tally of 15 aircraft in only 19 days. During this period he had been slightly wounded once, and had to bale out of stricken Spitfires three times. Published on 22 October 1940, the citation read: “In September, 1940, whilst engaged on a patrol over the Dover area, Pilot Officer Lock engaged three Heinkel 113's one of which he shot down into the sea. Immediately afterwards he engaged a Henschel 126 and destroyed it. He has displayed great courage in the face of heavy odds, and his skill and coolness in combat have enabled him to destroy fifteen enemy aircraft within a period of nineteen days.” No. 41 Squadron's pilots were placed on four weeks' rotation rest following the intense period of operational sorties, returning to RAF Hornchurch in mid-October 1940. Lock immediately commenced where he had left off, shooting down four Bf 109s, including one in the air immediately above RAF Biggin Hill in full view of the cheering station airmen below. This victory brought his total to 20, making Lock a 'Quadruple Ace'. As the Luftwaffe attack faltered, Lock achieved fewer air victories. On 8 November 1940 his Spitfire was badly damaged during a skirmish with several Bf 109s over Beachy Head in East Sussex. The Spitfire was so badly damaged that Lock crash-landed in a ploughed field, but was able to walk away. On 17 November 1940 No. 41 Squadron attacked a formation of 70 Bf 109s of JG 54 that were top cover for a bomber raid on London. After shooting down one Bf 109, and setting another on fire, Lock's Spitfire was hit by a volley of cannon shells, which severely injured Lock's right arm and both legs, knocked the throttle permanently open, and seve
AVIATORS - BLACK TRAILBLAZERS
AVIATORS - BLACK TRAILBLAZERS
Elizabeth "Bessie" Coleman. Born in Atlanta, Texas, Coleman was the tenth of thirteen children. Her father, George Coleman, was of part Cherokee ancestry. Her parents were sharecroppers yet her early childhood was a happy one, spent playing in the front yard or on the porch. Sunday mornings and afternoons were spent at church. As the other children began to age and find work in the fields, Coleman assumed responsibilities around the house. She looked after her sisters, helped her mother, Susan Coleman, work in her garden, and performed many of the everyday chores of running the house. Coleman began school at the age of six and had to walk four miles each day to her all-black, one-room school. Despite sometimes lacking such materials as chalk and pencils Bessie was an excellent student. She loved to read and established herself as an outstanding math student. Bessie completed all eight grades of her one-room school. Every year Coleman’s routine of school, chores, and church was interrupted by the cotton harvest. Each man, woman, and child was needed to pick the cotton, so the Coleman family worked together in the fields during the harvest. In 1901, Bessie Coleman’s life took a dramatic turn. George Coleman left his family. He had become fed up with the racial barriers that existed in Texas. He returned to Oklahoma, or Indian Territory as it was then called, to find better opportunities, but Susan and the children did not go with him. At the age of twelve Bessie was accepted into the Missionary Baptist Church. When she turned eighteen Coleman took all of her savings and enrolled in the Oklahoma Colored Agricultural and Normal University (now called Langston University) in Langston, Oklahoma. Bessie completed only one term before she ran out of money and was forced to return home. Coleman knew there was no future for her in her home town, so she went to live with two of her brothers in Chicago while she looked for work. Chicago In 1915, at the age of twenty-three, Coleman moved to Chicago, Illinois, where she lived with her brothers and where she worked at the White Sox Barber Shop as a manicurist. There she heard tales of the world from pilots who were returning home from World War I. They told stories about flying in the war and Coleman started to fantasize about being a pilot. Her brother used to tease her by commenting that French women were better than African-American women because French women were pilots already. At the barbershop, Coleman met many influential men from the black community, including Robert S. Abbott, founder and publisher of the Chicago Defender, and Jesse Binga, a real estate promoter. Coleman received financial backing from Binga, and from the Chicago Defender, who capitalized on her flamboyant personality and her beauty to promote his newspaper, and to promote her cause. She could not gain admission to American flight schools because she was black and a woman. No black U.S. aviator would train her either. Robert Abbott encouraged her to study abroad. France Coleman took French language class at the Berlitz school in Chicago, and then traveled to Paris on November 20, 1920. Coleman learned to fly in a Nieuport Type 82 biplane, with "a steering system that consisted of a vertical stick the thickness of a baseball bat in front of the pilot and a rudder bar under the pilot's feet." On June 15, 1921 Bessie Coleman became the first African-American woman to earn an aviation pilot's license in the world — and the first African-American woman to earn an international aviation license from the Federation Aeronautique Internationale. Determined to polish her skills, Coleman spent the next two months taking lessons from a French ace pilot near Paris, and in September sailed for New York. Airshows Coleman quickly realized that in order to make a living as a civilian aviator—the age of commercial flight was still a decade or more in the future—she would need to become a stunt flier, "barnstorming," and perform for paying audiences. But to succeed in this highly competitive arena, she would need advanced lessons and a more extensive repertoire. Returning to Chicago, Coleman could find no one willing to teach her, so in February of 1922 she sailed again for Europe. She spent the next two months in France completing an advanced course in aviation, then left for Holland to meet with Anthony Fokker, one of the world's most distinguished aircraft designers. She also traveled to Germany, where she visited the Fokker Corporation and received additional training from one of the company's chief pilots. She returned to the United States with the confidence and enthusiasm she needed to launch her career in exhibition flying. Coleman made her first appearance in an American air show on September 3, 1922, at an event honoring veterans of the all-black 369th American Expeditionary Force of World War I. Held at Curtiss Field near New York City and sponsored by her friend

accelerated flight schools
accelerated flight schools
Learning To Fly - Becoming A Pilot
The Getting Your Pilots License Book shows you everything you need to know about getting your pilots license fast.

If you’ve always dreamed of flying high in the sky over trees, lakes and mountains, this book is just what you’ve been looking for.

You’ll start off with a detailed introduction that will give you all of the basic information you need to fully understand what it takes to get your license.

Next you’ll cover a necessity, which is getting your medical certificate so that you can start training as soon as possible.

You’ll also discover the truth about the costs associated with learning how to fly and go over how to choose a good instructor or school to work with.

You’ll even learn how to get someone else to pay for your instruction if you want to make a career out of flying.

Also covered is advice for getting the most out of your training as well as how to beat flight sickness.

Finally you’ll go over graduation, where you go after graduation and how to find a plane you can buy for your own personal use.

The Getting Your Pilots License Book shows you everything you need to know about getting your pilots license fast.

If you’ve always dreamed of flying high in the sky over trees, lakes and mountains, this book is just what you’ve been looking for.

You’ll start off with a detailed introduction that will give you all of the basic information you need to fully understand what it takes to get your license.

Next you’ll cover a necessity, which is getting your medical certificate so that you can start training as soon as possible.

You’ll also discover the truth about the costs associated with learning how to fly and go over how to choose a good instructor or school to work with.

You’ll even learn how to get someone else to pay for your instruction if you want to make a career out of flying.

Also covered is advice for getting the most out of your training as well as how to beat flight sickness.

Finally you’ll go over graduation, where you go after graduation and how to find a plane you can buy for your own personal use.