RUSTIC CHRISTMAS DECORATING. CHRISTMAS DECORATING

Rustic Christmas Decorating. Black Bear Cabin Decor.

Rustic Christmas Decorating


rustic christmas decorating
    christmas decorating
  • (Christmas decoration) A Christmas decoration is any of several types of decorations used at Christmastime. The traditional colours of Christmas are pine green (evergreen), snow white, and heart red.
    rustic
  • Constructed or made in a plain and simple fashion, in particular
  • countrified: characteristic of rural life; "countrified clothes"; "rustic awkwardness"
  • Lacking the sophistication of the city; backward and provincial
  • bumpkinly: awkwardly simple and provincial; "bumpkinly country boys"; "rustic farmers"; "a hick town"; "the nightlife of Montmartre awed the unsophisticated tourists"
  • an unsophisticated country person
  • Having a simplicity and charm that is considered typical of the countryside
rustic christmas decorating - Thimbleberries Christmas
Thimbleberries Christmas Cottage: Country-Cottage Style Decorating, Entertaining, Collecting, and Quilting Inspirations for Creating Your Dream
Thimbleberries Christmas Cottage: Country-Cottage Style Decorating, Entertaining, Collecting, and Quilting Inspirations for Creating Your Dream
In a charming guest cottage that reflects the joys of Christmas inside and out, Lynette Jensen shares her family recipes and design ideas including luminaries, gift wraps, ornaments, quilts, fabric inspirations, and more. You'll also find dozens of festive decorating and entertaining ideas-including fresh new ways to use greens and naturals indoors and outdoors. Step-by-step how-tos, illlustrations, and patterns provide a hands-on guide for creating a Christmas to remember--in every room of your holiday house!

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The First Christmas Card in the world
The First Christmas Card in the world
Millions of Christmas cards are now flooding through the letter boxes of Britain - and it's all thanks to a Bath businessman called Sir Henry Cole. You'll find plenty of plaques and memorials around Bath to famous residents but where, you might ask, is the tribute to the man whose invention in early Victorian times is still part of every family's festive celebrations - the Christmas card? The last 150 years have seen many claimants - but it now seems certain that the festive card was the idea of Sir Henry Cole, the son of a Dragoon Guards captain, born in Bath's Milsom Street in 1808. Sir Henry was a busy civil servant who helped set up the Public Records Office, London's Victoria and Albert museum and the Royal College of Music. He was also one of the organisers of the Great Exhibition of 1851, published illustrated children's books and won an award for designing a tea service. But his real claim to fame came when, in 1843, after forgetting to send his regular Christmas greetings to his friends and needing a quick means of communicating with them, he suggested to well-known artist and friend John Callcott Horsley that he produce a seasonal greetings card which could be mechanically printed. Sir Henry's first hand-tinted cards - there were just 1,000 of them - were published commercially in 1846 and sold at a shilling each (five pence) through a children's magazine, Felix Summerley's Home Treasury. The card, depicting guests toasting the recipient, caused quite a stir at the time. An enraged Temperance lobby tried to ban it but, fortunately for today's greetings card industry, they failed. Despite Cole's efforts the experiment was not a great success and, although he didn't repeat the venture, it proved the inspiration for later cards, especially in America. There have been several claims for earlier cards than Cole's - usually just a few lines written on specially prepared sheets decorated with borders and scrolls - but Sir Henry's champions insist that he is the 'father of the Christmas card'. In an attempt to settle the wrangle, Cole's publisher, Joseph Cundall, wrote to The Times in 1884 saying: 'The drawing (of the card) was made by J C Horsley RA; it was printed in lithography by Mr Jobbins of Warwick Court, Holborn, and coloured by hand. Many copies were sold, but possibly not more than 1,000. It was the usual size of a lady's card.' Horsley, by then an old man, agreed that he had been the designer of the first Christmas card, although he stressed that it was Sir Henry's idea. And Sir Henry's daughter, Henrietta, revealed in 1903: 'I have in my possession one of these cards, coloured and sent to my father with the inscription 'Xmasse 1843'. Wishing to verify the date, I consulted my father's diaries and found the following entry - 17th November, 1843, Mr Horsley came and brought design for Christmas card.' So, that seems to settle it then - Sir Henry was undoubtedly the inventor of the modern Christmas card. The first designs, strangely enough, had little religious, or even festive, significance. Flowers, fish, reptiles, animals, fairies and children were the usual subjects, with no signs of robins, holly and mistletoe, plum puddings, bells or even any of those obligatory snow-covered Dickensian-style stagecoaches. They weren't to appear for many years. Cole's card, printed on stiff cardboard and measuring five inches by three, was divided into three sections by rustic poles and vines. It showed a family party, full of bonhomie and good cheer, flanked by smaller pictures of the Victorian ideals of charity - the hungry being fed and the ragged being clothed. It carried the wording 'A Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year to You' - the very same message that many card publishers still use today. Space was left at the top to record the name of the recipient and at the bottom to record the name of the sender. A rare print of one of those first 1,000 cards - only 20 or so have survived into the 21st century - was sold at auction recently for more than ?22,000 - not a bad price for something that originally cost five pence. However, the idea didn't really capture the nation's imagination until 1880, when a young entrepreneur called Adolf Tuck organised a nationwide competition - with 500 guineas going to the winner - for the best card designs. Famous artists were commissioned to design cards along with words written by well-known poets. The immensely popular Victorian poet Lord Tennyson was once invited, but turned down, an invitation to write a dozen verses for which he would have been paid 1,000 guineas. But it was the introduction of the 1840's penny post, which meant that ordinary people could mail greetings to their friends easily and cheaply, and especially the 1870's halfpenny post - introduced for cards and unsealed envelopes - which meant that the custom of sending Christmas cards really took off. Small cheap cards, with an embossed border and with the simple greeting 'A Mer
breakfast room christmas tree
breakfast room christmas tree
This is a rustic-looking pine tree that I decorate every year with our more rustic, country and homemade ornaments. The garland is twine with painted wooden hearts and stars. The ornaments have been collected over the years.

rustic christmas decorating
rustic christmas decorating
36 Inch Grapevine Tree with Wide Base - Christmas Tree
36 Inch Grapevine TreeMakes a great Christmas tree; or, as a Hearth accent. Add some of our brown cord mini-lights and it provides a nice warm light for your patio or porch.Made from natural growing vine from the hills of eastern Tennessee.Measures 36" tall x 18" wide at base.Note: Shipped in 2 pieces with tabs marking alignment wires to easily and securely connect in forming your tree. Makes shipping and storage a cinch. A NOTE ABOUT THE MINI LIGHTS:Currently our mini lights are out of stock. We apologize for this inconvenience.Ships normally in 7-10 business days.

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