LEAD

(203) 757-7202


What is Lead?

Lead paint or lead-based paint is paint containing lead, as pigment, with lead(II) chromate (PbCrO4, "chrome yellow") and lead(II) carbonate (PbCO3, "white lead") being the most common. Lead is added to paint to speed up drying, increase durability, maintain a fresh appearance, and resist moisture that causes corrosion. It is one of the main health and environmental hazards associated with paint.

Remediation

Our company provides professional lead remediation services to diminish the exposure to lead in commercial and residential buildings. We are both licensed with the state of Connecticut and an EPA Certified firm.

EPA Requirements

Common renovation activities like sanding, cutting, and demolition can create hazardous lead dust and chips by disturbing lead-based paint, which can be harmful to adults and children.

To protect against this risk, on April 22, 2008, EPA issued a rule requiring the use of lead-safe practices and other actions aimed at preventing lead poisoning. Under the rule, beginning April 22, 2010, contractors performing renovation, repair and painting projects that disturb lead-based paint in homes, child care facilities, and schools built before 1978 must be certified and must follow specific work practices to prevent lead contamination.


Home Danger Zone Finder

What to Look for:

If your house or apartment was built before 1978, chances are it contains lead-based paint. The older the building, the more likely it will contain lead-based paint.

Outside

Fences and Porches:

  • Lead based paint was often used in these areas. Look for chipping or peeling paint that could get into the soil where your children play.

Soil:

  • When exterior lead-based paint from houses or buildings flakes or peels it can get into the soil around your home. Lead dust can also be tracked into the home from the soil outside. Soil can also be contaminated from lead sources outside the home including lead in gasoline, industrials sites and mining activity.
  • Lead dust can also be tracked into the home from the soil outside. Teach your family to wipe their shoes and keep them by the front door.

Doors:

  • Lead based paint was often used in these areas. Check doors and hinges because dust from lead-based paint can be created where painted surfaces rub together when you open and close doors.

Windows:

  • Check windows, inside your home and out. Dust from lead-based paint can be created and build up where painted surfaces rub together, like when you open and close your windows.

Vinyl Mini-Blind:

  • Some imported, non-glossy vinyl mini-blinds can be a lead hazard. Sunlight and heat can break down the blinds and may release lead-contaminated dust.

Inside the Home

Water:

  • Water lines and plumbing. Check to see if you have plumbing with lead or lead solder and if your water utility uses lead service lines. Remember, you cannot see, smell or taste lead. Boiling your water will not get rid of lead and can increase the lead concentration in the water.

Window Sills:

  • Check the windowsills, through your home. Dust from lead-based paint can be created and building up where painted surfaces rub together, like when you open and close your windows.

Doors:

  • Lead based paint was often used in these areas. Check doors and hinges because dust from lead-based paint can be created where painted surfaces rub together when you open and close doors.

Older Painted Built-Ins:

  • If your home was built before 1978, lead-based paint may have been used for built-in bookcases and shelves. Check for any peeling, cracking or chipped paint.

Baseboards and Walls:

  • Check baseboards and walls for peeling, cracking or chipped paint. Be careful of generating dust when hammering or sanding walls that may have lead-based paint.

Staircases and Banisters:

  • If you have older painted stairs and banisters, check them for any peeling, cracking or chipped paint from wear and tear over the years.
















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