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Stanley Furniture Four


stanley furniture four
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  • Stanley Furniture is an American furniture manufacture based in Stanleytown, Henry County, Virginia, United States. It was founded in 1924 by Thomas Bahnson Stanley, who later became governor of Virginia.
stanley furniture four - Stanley 748258
Stanley 748258 - Clear Coated Aluminum(AL) Screen Or Storm Door Knob Latch
Stanley 748258 - Clear Coated Aluminum(AL) Screen Or Storm Door Knob Latch
Stanley 748258 - Clear Coated Aluminum(AL) Screen Or Storm Door Knob LatchStanley is proud of its reputation for excellence. They are dedicated to continually testing, designing and improving their products to ensure quality and maximum function. Maintaining their standing of being the world's best at what they do is important to them and what you expect from a name like Stanley. Stanley 748258 - Clear Coated Aluminum(AL) Screen Or Storm Door Knob Latch Features:; For screen, storm or combination doors from 3/4" to 1-1/8" in thickness ; Easy to install, requires only 3 holes, and no mortising necessary ; Floating bolt in handle gives the necessary flexible action to provide easy latching with any door closer ; Equipped with a simple, positive, safety slide ; All springs are rust proof ; Carded ; 74-8257: Flat Black ; 74-8258: Aluminum Clear coat

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Horn & Hardart Automat Cafeteria Building
Horn & Hardart Automat Cafeteria Building
Upper West Side, Manhattan The 3-story, limestone-clad Horn & Hardart Automat-Cafeteria Building at 2710-2714 Broadway (at West 104th Street), a distinctive small-scale commercial structure executed in the Art Deco style, is one of the best surviving examples of the popular chain restaurants that proliferated in the city during the first three decades of the 20th century. In 1927, the Horn & Hardart Co. became the leaseholder of this site. This building was constructed in 1930 to the design of F[rederick]. P[utnam]. Platt & Brother [Charles Carsten Platt], who executed numerous New York commissions for Horn & Hardart from about 1916 to 1932. By 1927, F.P. Platt & Bro. had developed a modern and functional design prototype for purpose-built Horn & Hardart automat-cafeteria buildings, with large windows, that assisted the restaurant chain in achieving a consistent commercial image. The Horn & Hardart Co., established in 1911, was the New York subsidiary of the Horn & Hardart Baking Co. of Philadelphia, which had been incorporated in 1898 by Joseph V. Horn and Frank A. Hardart, lunchroom proprietors since 1888. In 1902, Horn & Hardart opened its first waiterless Philadelphia restaurant, or "automat," in which customers could retrieve food directly from windows after depositing nickels in European-made equipment. The first New York automat opened in 1912, with American machinery, at 1557 Broadway in Times Square. Known for uniformly good food at low cost, automats became wildly popular and one of the city's cherished democratic institutions, appealing to a wide clientele. This automat-cafeteria building is made notable by its glazed polychrome Art Deco style terra-cotta ornament on the third story. Executed in hues of green, blue, tan, and gold luster by the Atlantic Terra Cotta Co., the terra cotta is located on sills, panels above the windows, stylized pilaster capitals, and the building's terminating band. The highly sophisticated panels feature stylized floral motifs and zigzag patterns; the modeler of these panels has not been identified, but the work is strikingly similar to that of preeminent architectural sculptor Rene P. Chambellan. Horn & Hardart remained a tenant on the ground story and mezzanine here until 1953, and the mezzanine level was remodeled as a full story in 1955. There have been a wide variety of commercial and organizational tenants over the years. While the current ground-floor storefront covers historic elements, visible above this are the upper portion of the original central segmental arched opening (with a fluted molded granite surround with a keystone) and the top of the bronze entrance portal and decorative bronze spandrel. Four lots at the southeast corner of Broadway and West 104th Street were assembled in 1885, 1901, and 1904 by George W. Walker. The combined property, built up with four structures, was leased to D[avid]. A. Schulte, Inc. (Schulte Real Estate Co./ Schulte Cigar Co.) in 1920. In December 1926, this property was sub-leased to the Broadway & 104th Street Realty Co., under Samuel Gershowitz, who, according to the #ew For^ T'wes, "apparently made a business of opening eating places and selling them," and had gangster-related connections.18 The Horn & Hardart Co. became the lessee a year later for $50,000. The #ew For^ T'wes in December 1927 announced that the firm would "upon the expiration of existing leases, erect a new building to house in part a branch automat cafeteria."19 George W. Walker's will, probated in March 1930, left this property jointly to his sons, George L. Walker (who served as a chief engineer of buildings and sanitary inspection for New York City) and Samuel B. Walker, and his daughter, Katherine V. Walker Born. F.P. Platt & Bro. filed plans in April 1930 for a 2-story plus mezzanine automat-cafeteria and office building, measuring approximately 71 by 69 feet and expected to cost $105,000. Construction began at the end of May and was completed in just five months, in October 1930. T.J. Murphy Co. was the contractor. The Art Deco style design, executed chiefly in limestone, featured on the main Broadway facade: a polished granite veneer base, with decorative metal grilles; a central 1-1/2-story segmental arched opening (with a fluted molded granite surround with a keystone) having an entrance portal (with ornamental bronze enframement) flanked by show windows on the ground story, a decorative bronze spandrel, and multi-pane windows with vertical mullions on the mezzanine level; a storefront at the north end of the ground story, and a storefront window and upstairs entrance at the south end, all flanked by fluted moldings; on the mezzanine level, a rectangular steel casement window (flanked by fluted moldings) above each storefront; and five multi-pane windows with terra-cotta sills on the second story, flanked by pilasters with stylized terra-cotta capitals, and
Horn & Hardart Automat Cafeteria Building
Horn & Hardart Automat Cafeteria Building
Casa Puebla, Upper West Side, Manhattan, New York City, New York, United States The 3-story, limestone-clad Horn & Hardart Automat-Cafeteria Building at 2710-2714 Broadway (at West 104th Street), a distinctive small-scale commercial structure executed in the Art Deco style, is one of the best surviving examples of the popular chain restaurants that proliferated in the city during the first three decades of the 20th century. In 1927, the Horn & Hardart Co. became the leaseholder of this site. This building was constructed in 1930 to the design of F[rederick]. P[utnam]. Platt & Brother [Charles Carsten Platt], who executed numerous New York commissions for Horn & Hardart from about 1916 to 1932. By 1927, F.P. Platt & Bro. had developed a modern and functional design prototype for purpose-built Horn & Hardart automat-cafeteria buildings, with large windows, that assisted the restaurant chain in achieving a consistent commercial image. The Horn & Hardart Co., established in 1911, was the New York subsidiary of the Horn & Hardart Baking Co. of Philadelphia, which had been incorporated in 1898 by Joseph V. Horn and Frank A. Hardart, lunchroom proprietors since 1888. In 1902, Horn & Hardart opened its first waiterless Philadelphia restaurant, or "automat," in which customers could retrieve food directly from windows after depositing nickels in European-made equipment. The first New York automat opened in 1912, with American machinery, at 1557 Broadway in Times Square. Known for uniformly good food at low cost, automats became wildly popular and one of the city's cherished democratic institutions, appealing to a wide clientele. This automat-cafeteria building is made notable by its glazed polychrome Art Deco style terra-cotta ornament on the third story. Executed in hues of green, blue, tan, and gold luster by the Atlantic Terra Cotta Co., the terra cotta is located on sills, panels above the windows, stylized pilaster capitals, and the building's terminating band. The highly sophisticated panels feature stylized floral motifs and zigzag patterns; the modeler of these panels has not been identified, but the work is strikingly similar to that of preeminent architectural sculptor Rene P. Chambellan. Horn & Hardart remained a tenant on the ground story and mezzanine here until 1953, and the mezzanine level was remodeled as a full story in 1955. There have been a wide variety of commercial and organizational tenants over the years. While the current ground-floor storefront covers historic elements, visible above this are the upper portion of the original central segmental arched opening (with a fluted molded granite surround with a keystone) and the top of the bronze entrance portal and decorative bronze spandrel. Four lots at the southeast corner of Broadway and West 104th Street were assembled in 1885, 1901, and 1904 by George W. Walker. The combined property, built up with four structures, was leased to D[avid]. A. Schulte, Inc. (Schulte Real Estate Co./ Schulte Cigar Co.) in 1920. In December 1926, this property was sub-leased to the Broadway & 104th Street Realty Co., under Samuel Gershowitz, who, according to the #ew For^ T'wes, "apparently made a business of opening eating places and selling them," and had gangster-related connections.18 The Horn & Hardart Co. became the lessee a year later for $50,000. The #ew For^ T'wes in December 1927 announced that the firm would "upon the expiration of existing leases, erect a new building to house in part a branch automat cafeteria."19 George W. Walker's will, probated in March 1930, left this property jointly to his sons, George L. Walker (who served as a chief engineer of buildings and sanitary inspection for New York City) and Samuel B. Walker, and his daughter, Katherine V. Walker Born. F.P. Platt & Bro. filed plans in April 1930 for a 2-story plus mezzanine automat-cafeteria and office building, measuring approximately 71 by 69 feet and expected to cost $105,000. Construction began at the end of May and was completed in just five months, in October 1930. T.J. Murphy Co. was the contractor. The Art Deco style design, executed chiefly in limestone, featured on the main Broadway facade: a polished granite veneer base, with decorative metal grilles; a central 1-1/2-story segmental arched opening (with a fluted molded granite surround with a keystone) having an entrance portal (with ornamental bronze enframement) flanked by show windows on the ground story, a decorative bronze spandrel, and multi-pane windows with vertical mullions on the mezzanine level; a storefront at the north end of the ground story, and a storefront window and upstairs entrance at the south end, all flanked by fluted moldings; on the mezzanine level, a rectangular steel casement window (flanked by fluted moldings) above each storefront; and five multi-pane windows with terra-cotta sills on the second story, flanked

stanley furniture four
stanley furniture four
Stanley Furniture Hudson Street 4 Drawer Lateral Wood File Storage Cabinet in Cocoa
The Stanley Hudson Street File Storage Chest is constructed of maple solids with walnut veneers. Both stylish and practical, the Stanley Furniture Hudson Street Warm Cocoa File Storage Chest provides plenty of storage options. In a warm cocoa finish, the chest features three utility drawers and a file drawer complete with a lock. The Hudson Street Warm Cocoa File Storage Chest has adjustable levelers so you can personalize it to your liking. Proudly made in the USA. Features: Chest is constructed of maple solids with walnut veneers Chest has a warm cocoa finish Chest features three utility drawers File features one locking drawerAccommodates both legal and letter-size filesAdjustable levelers Specifications: Overall dimensions: 30.31" H x 32.25" W x 24" D Weight: 151 lbs

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