BEST CONTEMPORARY FURNITURE STORES. BEST CONTEMPORARY

Best contemporary furniture stores. City home furniture.

Best Contemporary Furniture Stores


best contemporary furniture stores
    contemporary
  • Dating from the same time
  • belonging to the present time; "contemporary leaders"
  • characteristic of the present; "contemporary trends in design"; "the role of computers in modern-day medicine"
  • Living or occurring at the same time
  • Belonging to or occurring in the present
  • a person of nearly the same age as another
    furniture
  • Large movable equipment, such as tables and chairs, used to make a house, office, or other space suitable for living or working
  • Furniture is the mass noun for the movable objects ('mobile' in Latin languages) intended to support various human activities such as seating and sleeping in beds, to hold objects at a convenient height for work using horizontal surfaces above the ground, or to store things.
  • Small accessories or fittings for a particular use or piece of equipment
  • furnishings that make a room or other area ready for occupancy; "they had too much furniture for the small apartment"; "there was only one piece of furniture in the room"
  • A person's habitual attitude, outlook, and way of thinking
  • Furniture + 2 is the most recent EP released by American post-hardcore band Fugazi. It was recorded in January and February 2001, the same time that the band was recording their last album, The Argument, and released in October 2001 on 7" and on CD.
    stores
  • A quantity or supply of something kept for use as needed
  • (store) keep or lay aside for future use; "store grain for the winter"; "The bear stores fat for the period of hibernation when he doesn't eat"
  • (store) shop: a mercantile establishment for the retail sale of goods or services; "he bought it at a shop on Cape Cod"
  • A retail establishment selling items to the public
  • Store-bought
  • (store) a supply of something available for future use; "he brought back a large store of Cuban cigars"
best contemporary furniture stores - Plan Toy
Plan Toy Chalet Doll House with Furniture
Plan Toy Chalet Doll House with Furniture
3 years & up. This attractive wooden dollhouse is made up of 2 units that can be arranged together in various ways creating a larger play area. The larger unit features 3 spacious levels and the smaller unit features 2 levels. This magnificent dollhouse has a huge sklight roofing. It comes with 2 staircases that can be moved to any part of the house. This dollhouse has been designed to be accessible from every side. It comes complete with a selection of furniture and accessories. (Family not included.) 32"H x 14"W x 24"L

83% (18)
Seligmann, Kurt (1900-1962) - 1959 Effervescent/Corn Spirit (Private Collection)
Seligmann, Kurt (1900-1962) - 1959 Effervescent/Corn Spirit (Private Collection)
Oil on canvas; 170.2 x 96.5 cm. Kurt Seligmann was a Swiss-American Surrealist painter and engraver. Born in Basel he was the son of a successful Furniture Department store owner. After study at the Ecole des Beaux Arts, Geneva, and several unhappy years working in his father's business in Basel, Seligmann left for Paris where he looked up his old friends from Geneva, the sculptor Alberto Giacometti and the art critic Pierre Courthion. Through Giacometti he met Hans Arp and Jean Helion, who admired his sinister biomorphic paintings and invited him to join their group, Abstraction-Creation Art Non-Figuratif. In the mid-1930s his work began to take on a more baroque aspect, as he animated the prancing figures in his paintings and etchings with festoons of ribbons, drapery and heraldic paraphernalia. It was about this time (1935) that he married Arlette Paraf, a granddaughter of the founder of the Wildenstein Gallery. Together they traveled extensively, first around the world (a year-long honey-moon trip in 1936) and then to North America and British Columbia (1938). In 1937, Seligmann was formally accepted as a member of the Surrealist group in Paris by Andre Breton, who collected his work. At the outbreak of World War Seligmann was the first European Surrealist to arrive in New York, ostensibly for an exhibition of his work. Once there, he began a concerted effort to aid his Surrealist colleagues left behind in France and bring them to safety. Seligmann's art continued to evolve and really matured in the 1940s in the United States, where he did his best work. Beginning in 1940, he and Arlette lived at the Beaux Arts Building at 40th Street in New York, and later acquired a farm north of the city in the hamlet of Sugar Loaf, in Orange County. Seligmann befriended many American artists and became a close friend of the art historian Meyer Schapiro. With Schapiro as author, he produced in 1944 a limited edition set of six etchings illustrating the Myth of Oedipus, surely his masterpiece in this medium and one of the greatest works of Surrealist printmaking. As the Surrealists' expert on magic, he also wrote The History of Magic : The Mirror of Magic (Pantheon Books, 1948). Mythology and esoterica always informed the fascinating and turbulent imagery of his "dance macabre" paintings, and his work began to be exhibited widely and acquired by museums throughout the United States and Europe after the war. Seligmann taught for many years at various colleges around New York, particularly at Brooklyn College, from which he retired in 1958. The changing nature of the New York art world toward an embracement of Abstract Expressionism caused his work to be relegated to past history. Due to illness, he gave up his New York apartment and retired to his farm, where he died of an accidental self-inflicted gunshot wound in 1962.
Seligmann, Kurt (1900-1962) - 1954c. Exotic Garden (Art Institute of Chicago, U.S.A.)
Seligmann, Kurt (1900-1962) - 1954c. Exotic Garden (Art Institute of Chicago, U.S.A.)
Oil on canvas; 37 1/4” x 36 1/4” Kurt Seligmann was a Swiss-American Surrealist painter and engraver. Born in Basel he was the son of a successful Furniture Department store owner. After study at the Ecole des Beaux Arts, Geneva, and several unhappy years working in his father's business in Basel, Seligmann left for Paris where he looked up his old friends from Geneva, the sculptor Alberto Giacometti and the art critic Pierre Courthion. Through Giacometti he met Hans Arp and Jean Helion, who admired his sinister biomorphic paintings and invited him to join their group, Abstraction-Creation Art Non-Figuratif. In the mid-1930s his work began to take on a more baroque aspect, as he animated the prancing figures in his paintings and etchings with festoons of ribbons, drapery and heraldic paraphernalia. It was about this time (1935) that he married Arlette Paraf, a granddaughter of the founder of the Wildenstein Gallery. Together they traveled extensively, first around the world (a year-long honey-moon trip in 1936) and then to North America and British Columbia (1938). In 1937, Seligmann was formally accepted as a member of the Surrealist group in Paris by Andre Breton, who collected his work. At the outbreak of World War Seligmann was the first European Surrealist to arrive in New York, ostensibly for an exhibition of his work. Once there, he began a concerted effort to aid his Surrealist colleagues left behind in France and bring them to safety. Seligmann's art continued to evolve and really matured in the 1940s in the United States, where he did his best work. Beginning in 1940, he and Arlette lived at the Beaux Arts Building at 40th Street in New York, and later acquired a farm north of the city in the hamlet of Sugar Loaf, in Orange County. Seligmann befriended many American artists and became a close friend of the art historian Meyer Schapiro. With Schapiro as author, he produced in 1944 a limited edition set of six etchings illustrating the Myth of Oedipus, surely his masterpiece in this medium and one of the greatest works of Surrealist printmaking. As the Surrealists' expert on magic, he also wrote The History of Magic : The Mirror of Magic (Pantheon Books, 1948). Mythology and esoterica always informed the fascinating and turbulent imagery of his "dance macabre" paintings, and his work began to be exhibited widely and acquired by museums throughout the United States and Europe after the war. Seligmann taught for many years at various colleges around New York, particularly at Brooklyn College, from which he retired in 1958. The changing nature of the New York art world toward an embracement of Abstract Expressionism caused his work to be relegated to past history. Due to illness, he gave up his New York apartment and retired to his farm, where he died of an accidental self-inflicted gunshot wound in 1962.

best contemporary furniture stores
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