HOW TO CLEAN DUST OUT OF LAPTOP - HOW TO CLEAN DUST

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How To Clean Dust Out Of Laptop


how to clean dust out of laptop
    how to
  • (How To’s) Multi-Speed Animations
  • Providing detailed and practical advice
  • A how-to or a how to is an informal, often short, description of how to accomplish some specific task. A how-to is usually meant to help non-experts, may leave out details that are only important to experts, and may also be greatly simplified from an overall discussion of the topic.
  • Practical advice on a particular subject; that gives advice or instruction on a particular topic
    out of
  • Refers to the horse's maternal parentage. For example: Discovery is out of Ariadne.
  • Signifies rising from, as "out of a ducal coronet an eagle."
  • motivated by; "idleness is the trait of being idle out of a reluctance to work"
    clean
  • Make (something or someone) free of dirt, marks, or mess, esp. by washing, wiping, or brushing
  • make clean by removing dirt, filth, or unwanted substances from; "Clean the stove!"; "The dentist cleaned my teeth"
  • free from dirt or impurities; or having clean habits; "children with clean shining faces"; "clean white shirts"; "clean dishes"; "a spotlessly clean house"; "cats are clean animals"
  • Remove the innards of (fish or poultry) prior to cooking
  • clean and jerk: a weightlift in which the barbell is lifted to shoulder height and then jerked overhead
    dust
  • Any material in the form of tiny particles
  • Fine, dry powder consisting of tiny particles of earth or waste matter lying on the ground or on surfaces or carried in the air
  • A fine powder
  • fine powdery material such as dry earth or pollen that can be blown about in the air; "the furniture was covered with dust"
  • remove the dust from; "dust the cabinets"
  • debris: the remains of something that has been destroyed or broken up
how to clean dust out of laptop - Dust
Dust
Dust
SEVEN-YEAR-OLD MATTHEW DISAPPEARS one day on a walk into Horshoe, a dust bowl farm town in Depression-era Saskatchewan. Other children go missing just as a strange man named Abram Harsich appears in town. He dazzles the townspeople with the promises of a rainmaking machine. Only Matthew’s older brother Robert seems to be able to resist Abram’s spell, and to discover what happened to Matthew and the others.

“A remarkably effective sense of atmosphere.”—Kirkus Reviews, Starred

“Choose it for science-fiction fans who are ready for something a little different.”—School Library Journal, Starred

“Beautifully written novel . . . strong character development, an authentic setting, and some genuinely spooky moments.”—VOYA, Starred

A Governor General’s Award for Children’s Literature

An ALA Best Books for Young Adults


From the Hardcover edition.

87% (19)
Skyline Drive, Va: trip #1
Skyline Drive, Va: trip #1
[G9 ISO80 175mm effective > dcraw > Gimp AWB] The first result of the evening, last one posted :) all in the Explorer sort-order, I guess. Anyway these are all panes of a pano that I shot here at 175mm effective with the G9 I just went through the set to find some shots that would look good in and of themselves. Also I wanted to get a look at some of the G9 shots from Skyline Drive, I took so many...I easily took 500 shots up here that day, ran out of space on an 8GB card. Only brought the one card thinking that's all that I would need...and I can't tell you how many times I ran the *battery* out on it having only one battery and the batteries are good for about 500 shots. This time I had two batteries but only one SD card :) Just as well or I would have come back with 1000 shots. Anyway this is the thing that is both a blessing and a curse with the G9. It's not nearly wide enough at 35mm effective to take good wide-angle shots, and the lens is not sharp enough and the pixels are too small for great tele shots at the 210mm effective limit of the lens. But it's *great* between 35mm and about 200mm effective. It's great for what I did with it here: shoot a 30-pane pano at 175mm effective on a bright, sunny day at ISO80. . I shot a lot of panos with the G9. The problem with it is that I got really tired of shooting panos with it, as easy as it was. It's still not nearly as easy as walking up, taking a shot or three, and then leaving knowing that you have a good shot of the scene. Hard enough to do up here where the overlooks really require a 20mm effective lens, but there's a big gulf between 20mm and 35mm effective. And on the long side as well, 210mm is really not that long when shooting tight over water or wide-open spaces. So it was often not wide enough or long enough or sharp enough or clean enough...it was the proverbial "jack of all trades, master of none". A great camera for people who are used to shooting slow 50mm primes, 35mm-125mm zooms. No competition at all for the A200 with the Tamron 18-250. Except for the fact that it was half the size of the A200 alone. But it actually cost me more than the A200 with the stock Sony 18-70. Still I got so frustrated with it that after I dropped it, jammed the lens and then it had questionable focus after I got it unjammed, I sold it if only to be rid of it and forced to try something new. I still know that it's a good camera, I got a lot of good shots with mine and I know that it's a very useful camera as well. But it never generated "happiness". Just took pictures at 1fps in a calm, efficient manner and played them back nicely on it's 3" high-res LCD. Sucking about as much fun out of photography in the process of doing so as it possibly could have. It was just too easy to shoot and get decent shots out of it but the shots were never all that great. So...comparing these G9 shots to the scanned 35mm film, how does it look now? Well unfortunately didn't have a 175mm lens when I wen tup there with the N80, so I can't compare the two directly at that focal-length. I can only compare them in a more general fashion, and clearly the G9 handled the sky-flare better than the film+scanner combination, and obviously the images don't require cleaning or scanning. But if the film isn't too scratched-up already (I mean even the shots that I took with a CVS ISO400 disposable came out ok) and I can generate an ICC profile with the ColorChecker Pro and comparable film, I'll take another swing at scanning the film if I can configure the V100 with a proper ICC profile, or something close to one. I'll have to. Shooting film is too much fun and too cheap. The flipside to not being able to see the shots immediately is that you don't have to deal with processing them right after you shoot them, likewise 36 shots per roll means you don't have to deal with 500 shots per day. I have yet to stitch a pano with my film shots, I have about 8 rolls of developed film, half 24 half 36, and I've only scanned 5 of those 8 rolls in the month that I've had this V100. That makes it very easy to keep up with the scans, when you are used to post-processing a hundred shots at a time. Shooting film is not only saving me a lot of money and dramatically reducing the cost and guilt associated with my little "hobby", it's also dramatically cut my post-processing workload. I'd hate to give it up and spend a lot of money on a digital camera simply because I didn't take the time to properly ICC-profile the film & scanner. And even without ICC_profiling the results aren't so bad, if I don't look at them through a magnifying glass. If I get the overall exposure and wb-temp right & clean them up nicely, certainly an interesting challenge if you like to post-process. . But if I can find an "interesting" subframe for cheap that will AF the Tamron lenses that I already have for this 500si and N80 plus whatever I am likely to buy for them late
Pentagon, Tidal Basin view, Washington D.C.
Pentagon, Tidal Basin view, Washington D.C.
[Minolta 500si Tamron 28-300 Kodak Gold ISO400 color negative film > Epson V300 scanner > Gimp] As the cruise ship Odyssey prepares to pass by the portal to the LBJ harbor. Ok so it took me roughly 3 days to scan, crop, post and pare down to about 25 individual shots from 4 rolls of film. With some editing and commenting in the meantime. It takes about 15min to scan 4 frames at 4800dpi so scanning literally neglecting setup time took about 6 hours total. There's no way that I can do this and keep up with the scanner even when I only edit maybe 1 frame per roll in the meantime. The biggest time-sink by far is post-processing, then posting and organizing the shots on Flickr. Scanning, while of course not as easy as just dumping a bunch of raw files on my laptop and running dcraw in a batch file to convert them to jpeg, is not nearly as much trouble as the rest of it. Every 15 minutes I have to get out of my chair and I wouldn't even have to do that if I had the film on my desk. So take away the cost & time of buying, developing & scanning film and the tedium of fixing dust-blotches in the images and you're still left with 2/3rds of the work just in editing the shots and posting them online if, like me, you actually care about how they look and you're not happy with just dumping them into your stream and leaving them. Or you *could* shoot jpegs with AutoHDR or even raw with some complicated batch-processing conversion & posting process and have that all automated based on the Exif data. You'd still have to rotate & crop the shots, do selective sharpening etc unless you had extremely-clean gear with great in-camera processing. Plus write the code, or buy it somewhere. It could be done, I guess, but now you're talking about spending another $200+ in software or cobble together an open-source package or spend hours maybe days writing code just to post some shots on the Internet instead of doing it manually. In the end the only way to really save time is to just shoot jpeg in full-auto, dump everything in one set and let the public sort your shots for you :) But that means no cloning, rotating, no keystoning, lens-correction, exposure, fill, white-balance, contrast or sharpening adjustments of any kind, no labeling, no tagging, no titles, no sorting into sets, and unless you geo-tag your shots, no mapping. Shooting film vs digital means you have to manually geo-tag plus do the scanning and cleaning-up the shots. On top of everything that you would have to do anyway shooting digital. The one thing that you don't have to do, at least not so much, is fight to get decent color. And in my personal opinion? That is the hardest part of the whole deal. Also you don't ever have to worry about noise-reduction in exchange for having to select both your film and your framing intelligently to minimize the impact of grain. But with a decent aspect-ratio and a decent exposure, given a reasonable output-size, grain is really not much of a problem at all. In the end my biggest worry with film is the cost. It ain't cheap to shoot film, even at $3/roll, for 24 or 36 shots. You have to learn how to not run out and shoot 500 shots a day, that's for sure. On the other hand since all you can really do with it is set the exposure to 0eV and shoot it fast enough to get a good stable shot? You don't really need to do that anyway. Really all you need to do is carry enough film, check the focal-length, F# & shutter-speed before shooting, periodically ensure that the exposure is set to 0eV, take two or three shots for anything important and you'll be fine. There's no need to flip the ISO and exposure around and worry about pushing on top of all that, trying to get the best overall balance between exposure, highlight-headroom and noise. Film won't support that anyway, plain and simply the shot is either well-exposed and stable or it isn't. So yes the output is clearly better than what I would get out of a G9, given enough resolution (because the G9 has no problems with resolution), but run enough film through your camera and you're going to start to think about a cheap pocket point & shoot. At least. But I don't think that it's because it's *easier* to shoot digital, I think of it because it's cheaper. But I know the penalty that I'll pay for shooting a digicam again: always worrying about the color and chroma-noise. Always, always, always with digital cameras the end-result is worrying about color and noise, and white-balance and headroom & dynamic-range and exposure. It just never ends. With film? Set the camera to 0eV evaluative and shoot it at a decent shutter-speed and F#. Most of the time the shot will come out fine. Very rarely, mainly if there is a lot of bright reflected sky in the shot, it will occasionally still underexpose, but a touch of gamma will usually fix that and in any case you can overexpose by half a stop in those conditions. Grain is a concern but the way to fix grain is to

how to clean dust out of laptop
how to clean dust out of laptop
Dust
*Winner of the Governor General’s Award
*Winner of the Mr. Christie's Award
*An American Library Association Best Books for Young Adults
*Nominated for an Edgar Award (Mystery Writers of America)

For fans of Stephen King and Ray Bradbury...

Imagine a depression-era town where it hasn’t rained for years. A pale rainmaker with other-worldly eyes brings rain to the countryside and mesmerizes the townspeople, but the children begin to disappear one by one. Only young Robert Steelgate is able to resist the rainmaker’s spell and begin the struggle to discover what has happened to his missing brother and the other children.

"Read the riveting first chapter of Dust and you're already past the point of no return. Arthur Slade writes with the art and grace of a hypnotist, and you won't be able to put this book down. It's sensational!" Kenneth Oppel, New York Times bestselling author of AIRBORN and SKYBREAKER.

About the Author:
Arthur Slade was raised on a ranch in the Cypress Hills of southwest Saskatchewan and began writing at an early age. He has been writing fiction full time for fifteen years and is the author of sixteen bestselling books, including the "Northern Frights" series, "Jolted," and "The Hunchback Assignments." He currently lives in Saskatoon, Canada.

*Winner of the Governor General’s Award
*Winner of the Mr. Christie's Award
*An American Library Association Best Books for Young Adults
*Nominated for an Edgar Award (Mystery Writers of America)

For fans of Stephen King and Ray Bradbury...

Imagine a depression-era town where it hasn’t rained for years. A pale rainmaker with other-worldly eyes brings rain to the countryside and mesmerizes the townspeople, but the children begin to disappear one by one. Only young Robert Steelgate is able to resist the rainmaker’s spell and begin the struggle to discover what has happened to his missing brother and the other children.

"Read the riveting first chapter of Dust and you're already past the point of no return. Arthur Slade writes with the art and grace of a hypnotist, and you won't be able to put this book down. It's sensational!" Kenneth Oppel, New York Times bestselling author of AIRBORN and SKYBREAKER.

About the Author:
Arthur Slade was raised on a ranch in the Cypress Hills of southwest Saskatchewan and began writing at an early age. He has been writing fiction full time for fifteen years and is the author of sixteen bestselling books, including the "Northern Frights" series, "Jolted," and "The Hunchback Assignments." He currently lives in Saskatoon, Canada.

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