Björn Rabenstein's Rolling Stock


Rolling Stock is a card game for three to five players. The players take the role of investors. They buy private companies, which they may later turn into corporations or sell to already existing corporations. In addition, they can trade shares of those corporations. The player with the most shares in a corporation becomes its president and controls its actions. Corporations may own any number of those formerly private companies (that were sold to them by players or were used as the seed to found a new corporation). Companies owned by corporations are called subsidiary companies. Corporations can even buy subsidiary companies from each other. 

Subsidiary companies owned by the same corporation may create synergies with each other, increasing the income of the corporation. These synergies can be seen as a quite abstract representation of transportation networks. As more and more newer companies are brought into the game, older companies become less profitable and have to be written off eventually. Corporations have to struggle to stand the test of time. 

In the end, the richest player wins the game, measured by the added values of privately owned companies, shares of corporations, and cash.


Game Components
  • 10 symbol cards, each featuring a different corporation symbol. 
  • 100 shares, 10 for each of the 10 corporations, identified by their symbols. 
  • 5 blue player order cards.
  • 32 white share price cards showing share prices from $0 to $100 and a table used for adjusting share prices.
  • 45 companies.
  • 3 game end cards, one each for the training game, the short game, and the long game. 
  • 1 white foreign investor card.

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Scott Petersen,
Jan 20, 2014, 6:43 AM
Ċ
Scott Petersen,
Jan 20, 2014, 6:43 AM
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Scott Petersen,
Jan 6, 2014, 11:01 AM
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Scott Petersen,
Jan 6, 2014, 11:01 AM
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