Computational Physiology Home

AAAI 2011 Spring Symposia (http://www.aaai.org/Symposia/Spring/sss11.php)

 

March 21-23, Stanford University
 
Submission Deadlines: 
  • Abstract submissions (200 - 400 Words): November 19, 2010.
  • Notification of acceptance: December 10, 2010.
  • Extended Abstract (2 Pages) or Short Paper (4 - 6 Pages) Due: January 21, 2011.
Computational Physiology 
  
Automated human health-state monitoring aims to identify when an individual moves from a healthy to a compromised state. For example, changes in diet or physical activity can lead to life-threatening hypo or hyperglycemia in diabetics. Similarly, elderly individuals managing multiple chronic conditions may experience rapid changes in physical and cognitive health state that must be caught quickly for treatments to be most effective. Even in healthy individuals, heavy exertion in extreme climates can quickly lead to life threatening situations.

The emergence of inexpensive and unobtrusive health sensors promises to shift the healthcare industry’s focus from episodic care in acute settings to early detection and longitudinal care for chronic conditions in natural living environments. The same technologies can also be used to monitor healthy individuals in high-stress work situations. While these sensing systems are able to provide a wealth of physiological information, these measurements are often quite different from those used by physicians. The medical community is accustomed to making decisions from high-quality clinical data from a limited set of sessions. Data from continuously measuring sensors requires us to draw conclusions from large quantities of lower quality data from subacute environments where these measures are often not specific to health states of interest and can reflect the output of multiple latent variables. As the availability of longitudinal data increases, we have an unprecedented opportunity to discover new early predictors of clinically significant events.

This symposium will bring together researchers from the fields of artificial intelligence, machine learning, engineering, physiology, and medicine. The symposium will have invited talks and panels by select attendees to share relevant completed work. We will have breakout sessions and poster sessions to foster speculative discussions and presentation of works in progress. The goal of the symposium is to allow ample time for discussion and bridging of interdisciplinary perspectives.

Speakers:
  • Dave Andre (Body Media Inc.)
  • Jeff Ashe (GE Research)
  • James Blum (University of Michigan Medical Center)
  • Matthew Goodwin (MIT Media Lab) Director of Clinical Research, Co-Director, Autism & Communication Technology
  • David C. Klonoff, M.D., F.A.C.P. Clinical Professor of Medicine, U.C. San Francisco Editor-in-Chief, Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology (in PubMed) Medical Director, Diabetes Research Institute
  • Kevin Montgomery (Stanford)
  • Brent Ruby (University of Montana, Department of Health and Human Performance) Wildland firefighters application area.
  • Marjorie Skubric (University of Missouri)
  • Zeeshan Syed (University of Michigan) Assistant Professor University of Michigan, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Program Committee
  • Dave Andre (Body Media Inc.)
  • Jeff Ashe (GE Research)
  • Dan Cleary (GE Research)
  • Emer Doheny (Intel)
  • Sumi Helal (University of Florida) Professor, Computer and Information Science & Engineering Department
  • Reed Hoyt, PhD (US Army research Institute of Environmental Medicine) Chief, Biophysics and Biomedical Modeling Division
  • David C. Klonoff, M.D., F.A.C.P. Clinical Professor of Medicine, U.C. San Francisco Editor-in-Chief, Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology (in PubMed) Medical Director, Diabetes Research Institute
  • Maja Mataric (USC) Professor of Computer Science, Neuroscience and Pediatrics Founding Director, USC Center for Robotics and Embedded Systems (cres.usc.edu) Director, USC Robotics Research Lab (robotics.usc.edu) Senior Associate Dean for Research, Viterbi School of Engineering
  • Jaques Reifman (Biotechnology High Performance Computing Institute) Senior Research Scientist Director, Biotechnology HPC Institute US Army Medical Research and Materiel Command
  • Zeeshan Syed (University of Michigan) Assistant Professor University of Michigan, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

 

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