CHEAP HORIZONTAL BLINDS : HORIZONTAL BLINDS

CHEAP HORIZONTAL BLINDS : INTERIOR RAISED PANEL SHUTTERS

Cheap Horizontal Blinds


cheap horizontal blinds
    horizontal
  • A horizontal line, plane, etc
  • parallel to or in the plane of the horizon or a base line; "a horizontal surface"
  • something that is oriented horizontally
  • (horizontally) in a horizontal direction; "a gallery quite often is added to make use of space vertically as well as horizontally"
    blinds
  • Deprive (someone) of understanding, judgment, or perception
  • Cause (someone) to be unable to see, permanently or temporarily
  • A window blind is a type of window covering which is made with slats of fabric, wood, plastic or metal that adjust by rotating from an open position to a closed position by allowing slats to overlap. A roller blind does not have slats but comprises a single piece of material.
  • window coverings, especially vertical blinds, wood blinds, roller blinds, pleated blinds
  • Confuse or overawe someone with something difficult to understand
  • The blinds are forced bets posted by players to the left of the dealer button in flop-style poker games. The number of blinds is usually two, but can be one or three.
    cheap
  • brassy: tastelessly showy; "a flash car"; "a flashy ring"; "garish colors"; "a gaudy costume"; "loud sport shirts"; "a meretricious yet stylish book"; "tawdry ornaments"
  • (of prices or other charges) Low
  • relatively low in price or charging low prices; "it would have been cheap at twice the price"; "inexpensive family restaurants"
  • (of an item for sale) Low in price; worth more than its cost
  • bum: of very poor quality; flimsy
  • Charging low prices
cheap horizontal blinds - My Horizontal
My Horizontal Life
My Horizontal Life
You've either done it or know someone who has: the one-night stand, the familiar outcome of a night spent at a bar, sometimes the sole payoff for your friend's irritating wedding, or the only relief from a disastrous vacation. Often embarrassing and uncomfortable, occasionally outlandish, but most times just a necessary and irresistible evil, the one-night stand is a social rite as old as sex itself and as common as a bar stool. Enter Chelsea Handler. Gorgeous, sharp, and anything but shy, Chelsea loves men and lots of them. My Horizontal Life chronicles her romp through the different bedrooms of a variety of suitors, a no-holds-barred account of what can happen between a man and a sometimes very intoxicated, outgoing woman during one night of passion. From her short fling with a Vegas stripper to her even shorter dalliance with a well-endowed little person, from her uncomfortable tryst with a cruise ship performer to her misguided rebound with a man who likes to play leather dress-up, Chelsea recalls the highs and lows of her one-night stands with hilarious honesty. Encouraged by her motley collection of friends (aka: her partners in crime) but challenged by her family members (who at times find themselves a surprise part of the encounter), Chelsea hits bottom and bounces back, unafraid to share the gritty details. My Horizontal Life is one guilty pleasure you won't be ashamed to talk about in the morning. Chelsea Handler was born in Livingston, New Jersey, and has toured the country doing stand-up. Now settled in Los Angeles, she can be seen at the Comedy Store and the Laugh Factory, and as one of the stars on Oxygen's Girls Behaving Badly. Chelsea has guest-starred on programs such as Spy TV, My Wife and Kids, The Bernie Mac Show, and The Practice. Her stand-up will soon be televised on VH1's Love Lounge, Comedy Central's Premium Blend, and HBO's broadcast of the Aspen Comedy Festival. "Ch

You've either done it or know someone who has: the one-night stand, the familiar outcome of a night spent at a bar, sometimes the sole payoff for your friend's irritating wedding, or the only relief from a disastrous vacation. Often embarrassing and uncomfortable, occasionally outlandish, but most times just a necessary and irresistible evil, the one-night stand is a social rite as old as sex itself and as common as a bar stool. Enter Chelsea Handler. Gorgeous, sharp, and anything but shy, Chelsea loves men and lots of them. My Horizontal Life chronicles her romp through the different bedrooms of a variety of suitors, a no-holds-barred account of what can happen between a man and a sometimes very intoxicated, outgoing woman during one night of passion. From her short fling with a Vegas stripper to her even shorter dalliance with a well-endowed little person, from her uncomfortable tryst with a cruise ship performer to her misguided rebound with a man who likes to play leather dress-up, Chelsea recalls the highs and lows of her one-night stands with hilarious honesty. Encouraged by her motley collection of friends (aka: her partners in crime) but challenged by her family members (who at times find themselves a surprise part of the encounter), Chelsea hits bottom and bounces back, unafraid to share the gritty details. My Horizontal Life is one guilty pleasure you won't be ashamed to talk about in the morning. Chelsea Handler was born in Livingston, New Jersey, and has toured the country doing stand-up. Now settled in Los Angeles, she can be seen at the Comedy Store and the Laugh Factory, and as one of the stars on Oxygen's Girls Behaving Badly. Chelsea has guest-starred on programs such as Spy TV, My Wife and Kids, The Bernie Mac Show, and The Practice. Her stand-up will soon be televised on VH1's Love Lounge, Comedy Central's Premium Blend, and HBO's broadcast of the Aspen Comedy Festival. "Ch

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St. Paul’s Evangelical Lutheran Church, Sunday School And Parsonage
St. Paul’s Evangelical Lutheran Church, Sunday School And Parsonage
Williamsburg, Brooklyn, New York City, New York, United States Williamsburg, Brooklyn, New York City, New York, United States of America St. Paul’s Evangelical Lutheran Church, Sunday School and Parsonage, designed by the prominent American architect J. C. Cady in the Romanesque Revival style in 1884-85, is an exceptional example of this important style of architecture. Derived from the German Rundbogenstil, the Romanesque Revival style was introduced to this country in the 1840s by journals and immigrant architects from Central Europe. Cady, who was trained by a German emigre architect, used the style throughout his extensive body of work, finding it particularly adaptable to Protestant church designs. This style of architecture was used widely in the United States during the middle to end of the 19th century when picturesque, historical revival styles were in great demand. With its German origins the style was especially appropriate for this German Lutheran congregation, one of the earliest Brooklyn churches founded by this large immigrant group. When it was begun in 1852, St. Paul’s Evangelical Lutheran Church became the second German Lutheran congregation in Williamsburgh, Brooklyn, which was then evolving into one of the largest and most important communities for this populous group. The church prospered along with its congregants, maintaining religious services in the German language and offering an extensive educational program. As it grew, the congregation needed a larger building and laid the cornerstone for this structure at South Fifth and Rodney streets in 1884. J. C. Cady & Company was a well-known and prolific architectural firm of the period, whose work encompassed institutional and educational buildings and private residences, as well as religious structures. Perhaps Cady’s best known works were the Metropolitan Opera House (1881-84, demolished) and the American Museum of Natural History (18911908, a designated New York City Landmark). For St. Paul’s, Cady designed a substantial church building of brick and terra cotta, highlighted by a prominent corner bell tower. Its many stained-glass windows, round-arched openings and variety of towers and brick moldings enliven its simple red brick facade. Cady created a well-functioning and visually appealing grouping, where the horizontality of the church and school buildings are firmly balanced by the tall bell tower at the corner. The church complex, including the parsonage to the west and the school attached to the east, forms a cohesive group that anchors this residential section of Williamsburg. Originally a dynamic part of the important and influential German community, the church continues to serve a Spanish Lutheran congregation. Williamsburg, Brooklyn The Williamsburg section of Brooklyn is located in the northwest part of the borough, and was originally part of Bushwick, one of the borough’s original five towns. Initially rural and somewhat marshy, the area was sparsely settled by Dutch, French and Scandinavian farmers. In rural areas such as this, through the 1820s, most farmers owned slaves to help them work their land. The earliest signs of development started around 1800 when Richard M. Woodhull, a prosperous Manhattan merchant, purchased thirteen acres in the vicinity of North Second Street. He hired his friend Col. Jonathan Williams to survey the area of his purchase, laying out lots for development and named the area Williamsburgh in his honor. Woodhull also started a ferry across the East River to Corlear’s Hook in Manhattan and called it the Williamsburgh Ferry. Growth in the area was slow, however, until Noah Waterbury (sometimes called the “Father of Williamsburgh”) established a distillery along the waterfront at South Second Street in 1819 and built himself a house one block inland. In 1827 the Village of Williamsburgh was chartered, and a school census of 1829 listed a population of 1,007, including 72 African Americans. Major growth occurred in the 1840s by which time there were several ferries that linked the area to Manhattan allowing local farmers to bring their goods to the larger Manhattan market. At the same time industrial development began along the waterfront. The population of around 35,000 lived in three distinct areas, Southside, Northside, and Dutchtown in the eastern section of Williamsburgh where a small German settlement began. In 1852, the City of Williamsburgh was established, due to the huge growth that was taking place in the area. The waterfront expanded with new factories, bolstered by the deep water piers allowing for easy shipping of raw materials, the availability of land, and the growing population that provided cheap labor. Inexpensive housing for the workers was widely available, while at the same time large mansions for wealthy businessmen and industrialists were springing up along Kent Avenue (originally First Street). By 1855 Williamsburgh was consolidated into the new City o
Manhattan Waterfront: Chelsea Piers
Manhattan Waterfront: Chelsea Piers
[5D/Tamron28-300VC F8 ISO1600 1/30s handheld, dcraw->Gimp with the normal stuff] ...a classic example of "viewfinder-vision"...I didn't notice the sailboat coming out at the end of the dock...but it was getting very late, very dark and I'd been out there shooting for a couple of hours already. I was eager to leave :) You'll just have to go look yourself :) CP is a nice place, actually. Good bars & restaurants, definitely worth a visit. ..so for the inevitable "technical note" :) Shot's a bit "gray", isn't it? Standard Canon stuff. All the shots are a little flat and in-camera they punch it up with some red. Try shooting raw, do your favorite PP and just look at the camera jpegs embedded in the raw files. Use dcraw -e to extract them. ...I'm stuck somewhere between the D700 and the A850. I'll hang onto the G9 until it dies and upgrade it to a G11 or something similar. But the shots like this that I can take easily with a D700 & even a Tamron 28-300VC are too much to pass up. The battle now is between body-IS and 24MP (right at the diffraction limit at F8) and 12MP and a usable ISO6400 with the D700 vs a usable ISO1600 with the A850 if I'm lucky. 14bits vs 12bits is a push, for one I'd have to have a clean 16-bit PP path, which means 16-bit tiff intermediates and/or a true 16-bit post-processor to replace Gimp (which I hear is on the way, but still). All for what? At ISO1600+ how much signal is there going to be above the noise? It's going to come down to whether the A850 is too noisy or doesn't focus well-enough in low light. I know that it will be cleaner than the A200, but not much cleaner than the A700 if at all. I know the D700 will be cleaner and probably focus a little better. But it still isn't clean enough to knock the socks off a tripod, and it still has horizontal streak-noise due to lights at high ISO. But besides that, "dark" is fucking "dark", and there's not a whole lot to shoot when it's "dark". Unless you're right up on something, which means that I can shoot it with a fast prime. Which is where the body IS comes in. I just need it to be clean enough to get decent handheld shots in light like this with a Tamron 28-300. That's all I ask. Darker than this, I'm thinking a 35mm lens at F2.8, with body IS, and sure, I could try a 150mm+ handheld shot at 1/15s or so, but the odds of that being a keeper are pretty slim. So again it comes down to whether or not you want to buy and carry a $3k 12MP DSLR and lens to take the same shots that you could take just as well with a tripod and a G9? Granted, the D700 is a better DSLR overall than the A850 would be. But the A850 on a tripod beats the G9 on a tripod. I can't say the same for the D700 on a tripod, unless you factor-in the DR and SNR advantages of the D700 at ISO200 vs the G9 at even ISO80. But who is going to notice that in a 19x12" print, unless you sharpen the hell out of the shot before printing? And the D700, as good as it is, still can't beat the G9 on a tripod. The whole point of the D700 is to make a tripod unnecessary, but it can't do that if it's dark enough. The point of the D700 is not to give you 14-bit color and 12 bits of DR. It just happens to do that as a byproduct of its SNR vs ISO curves. But jpegs are 8 bit color with 8 stops of DR, and even the G9 has 12bit color and 10 stops of DR at low ISO. Those extra 2 bits and stops only help in post-processing, and even then only if you push a lot and work through a lot of intermediate files. The whole point of using a tripod is so that you don't have to do a lot of pushing and sweating over noise, lens speed and shutter-speed. You still have to do some sweating over these issues but not a lot. And then you have to sweat over the tripod. So it's a balance. Now ok sure, using a tripod is a pain, but that's $2500 that you're saving by using one, and it will still be useful with a D700. When you're facing a landscape shot at ISO6400 vs using a tripod, if you can use a tripod, you'll use it. I liked what I got out of a D700 in low light, yes it can do some awesome things. It simply can't beat a tripod. And head to head with a Tamron 28-300 on each, the D700 would win easily over an A850. The thing is that I can slap an old A-mount fast prime or short-throw zoom (think "short F2.8, long F4") on the A850 and still get body-IS. That simply isn't going to happen with the D700. Plus it's 25% cheaper. Sure, the Tamron 28-300VC will take it out to 300mm effective and slightly longer with a crop, and that's going to take the wind out of the sails of the average 70-300 or 80-400. I'm not buying a $900 35mm F2.8 VR lens to go on a D700. Not to mention an F2.0 or F1.8 without VR. The D700 needs to have an awesome SNR vs ISO chart. Because that's the only thing that makes it worth buying. But I do not intend to live out on the far end of that chart just to justify buying, carrying and shooting a $2500

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