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Flight Model Airplane


flight model airplane
    model airplane
  • Model aircraft are flying or non-flying models of existing or imaginary aircraft, often scaled-down versions of full size planes, using materials such as polystyrene, balsa wood, foam and fibreglass.
    flight
  • Shoot (wildfowl) in flight
  • an instance of traveling by air; "flying was still an exciting adventure for him"
  • (in soccer, cricket, etc.) Deliver (a ball) with well-judged trajectory and pace
  • a formation of aircraft in flight
  • shoot a bird in flight
flight model airplane - White Wings
White Wings Sport Planes, 6 Model Kit
White Wings Sport Planes, 6 Model Kit
Build six sport planes models from the elegant glider series all by yourself! -- -- Sport planes are a unique set of Whitewings. They are elegant in appearance and can achieve great flight performance. Under good conditions and properly tuned, these gliders will fly over 25 seconds, similar to the High Performance Glider kit. -- -- The Whitewings Sport Planes kit contains: 24-page Flight Manual booklet, 6 pre-cut Special Kent Paper, 6 pre-cut Balsa Fuselages and a catapult launcher. -- -- Make it a fun-filled "family activity" as you construct the Flying Boat III, the Light Plane 311 Twin Engine, the Light Plane 307, the Light Plane 322 Bi-Plane, the Light Plane 308, and the Light Plane 310 Motor Glider! Recommended for -- ages 8+.

78% (17)
1940s vintage model airplane
1940s vintage model airplane
My Dad made this some time between 1945 (the end of his WWII service) and 1949 (when marriage and fatherhood put a serious crimp on his hobby time). An "Olson and Rice" gasoline fueled spark ignition two stroke engine is inside the engine compartment. The original "silkspan" covering has long since disintegrated, though some of the original orange still visible. The sheet metal engine cover was fashioned from a "Prince Albert" brand tobacco can. I was told some years ago this model was named "Tomahawk" when in production... Those old engines use "white" (unleaded) gasoline and 70 single-weight engine oil (apparently frequently used in motorcycles of the era). My Dad always Coleman lantern fuel, because it least likely to have lead or other additives that would damage or clog up these small engines. Starting these engines required a bit of skill and technique. Two external "#6 ignition cells" supplied the power to the coil for starting, while two AA cells in the holder visible on the side of the fuselage powered the ignition during flight. And the spark advance had to be adjusted after starting. Woe be unto to the bare fingers of the person who had one of these engines backfire. "Chicken stick" starting is the best way to get these engines going.... Note the timer between the engine bay and the battery holder. It was used to limit the engine run for competion or general testing purposes. It's quite simple: the bleed-down of the air trapped inside was controlled by an an adjustable needle valve, and opened the switch to the ignition. The ignition is a miniatureized version of the points/condenser/coil system used in automobiles for decades. And yes, it's positive ground. The electrical engineering F*heads who converted automotive ignition to negative grouding degraded the ignition performance for the sake of stupid convention.
"C-Oh-Two" CO2 powered free flight model airplane
"C-Oh-Two" CO2 powered free flight model airplane
Here this little jewel is cruising at the end of the charge of gas... This is the squarest and truest sticks and tissue frame I'd made to this point, but it wasn't perfect and you can see the little bits of tape stuck on it as trim tabs... there were *definite* trim changes with changes in power... But here's the bottom line: I filled the tank, started it and let it go, and its flying around ABOVE the level I held it at when Iet it go. I call that success! hr_C02_cruise

flight model airplane
flight model airplane
White Wings Giant Wright Flyer
On December 17, 1903 the Wright Flyer amazed the world with a powered flight lasting 12 seconds and covering 120 feet. Relive the excitement with this flying model. -- Flights nearly as far as the original flight at Kitty Hawk a century ago are possible. Have the fun and thrill of building your very own Wright Flyer with this easy to assemble kit. No glue or tools are required and detailed instructions are included. -- The finished length and wing span is nearly 20". In addition, this kit includes a high speed winder which uses 4 "AA" batteries (not included). Recommended for ages 8+.

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