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  • A low-cost carrier or low-cost airline (also known as a no-frills, discount or budget carrier or airline) is an airline that generally has lower fares.
    alaska
  • a state in northwestern North America; the 49th state admitted to the union; "Alaska is the largest state in the United States"
  • (alaskan) a native or resident of Alaska
  • (alaskan) relating to or characteristic of the state or people of Alaska
  • The largest state in the US, in northwestern North America, with coasts on the Arctic and North Pacific oceans and on the Bering Sea, separated from the contiguous 48 US states by Canada; pop. 626,932; capital, Juneau; statehood: Jan. 3, 1959 (49). The territory was purchased from Russia in 1867. After oil was discovered in 1968, a pipeline was completed in 1977 to carry the oil from the North Slope to Valdez
cheap airfare alaska - Alaska
Alaska
Alaska
Two teenagers journey into the Alaskan wilderness to rescue their father, a bush pilot whose plane has crashed.

Director Fraser Heston captures the danger and beauty of Alaska in this adventurous family film about two kids who embark on a very personal rescue mission. Former 747 pilot Jake Barnes (Dirk Benedict) moved away from a fast-paced Chicago lifestyle with his two children, Jessie and Sean, after the death of his wife. While daughter Jessie thoroughly enjoys and excels in her new surroundings, son Sean's moodiness and homesickness escalates. One stormy night Jake's small plane crashes during an emergency flight, leaving him stuck on a treacherous cliff with a broken leg and no radio. The local search and rescue team soon gives up, prompting Sean and Jessie to kayak, hike, canoe, and rappel their way over many lush and snowy miles to save their dad.
Younger kids will enjoy the antics of Cubby, the baby polar bear who befriends the youthful trekkers and eventually leads them to their father. They'll also enjoy the good-natured sibling rivalry between the tough but tender-hearted Jessie (Thora Birch of Now and Then) and Sean (Vincent Kartheiser of The Indian in the Cupboard) and a chance to hiss at the two evil poachers (including the director's father, Charlton Heston). Parents, on the other hand, may feel compelled to explain etiquette around wild animals, the dangers of hypothermia, and how to pack for a long hike. But the scenic Cook's tour of Alaska and British Columbia makes some of these otherwise corny elements tolerable to grown-ups. --Liane Thomas

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Celebrating Alaska Statehood 50 Years January 3, 1959 - 2009 - A Personal Reflection
Celebrating Alaska Statehood 50 Years January 3, 1959 - 2009 - A Personal Reflection
I remember it like it was just a few months ago - I was already 2 years old and my Mom, a second generation Alaskan - Dee Lane, and my Dad, a third generation Alaskan - Chic Lane, took my sister Lisa and I over the few blocks from our house on the corner of 3rd avenue down to the Park Strip to watch the bonfire in celebration of hard won Alaskan statehood. There was a great huge pile of wood, and the fire was well underway -- men would run up with all kinds of wood, spare or not, and throw it on the fire. And a whole tree was thrown in too! The tree being dry burned really fast with a great sputtering noise mixed with the festive scent of painted wood all together. As I understand now, there were fireworks hidden in the wood pile that went off from time to time. The United States Senate had voted to make Alaska the 49th state on June 30, 1958. Just as we arrived from the north side a couple of men were dragging a large wooden box, the size of an outhouse or larger and throwing it on the fire, which was growing quite large. People stood around the fire in a huge circle and it was obvious there had been a bit of drinking going on. Part of a fence was thrown in, sometimes a couple of two-by-fours, or a 8 by 10 sheet of plywood, but mostly old sections of some built things. My father ran up with his camera just as my Mom was buttoning up my sister's jacket, I think he had parked the car, having just gotten off of work as an architect. She wanted to know what had taken so long. She was pregnant with my brother Ward, born in July of 1958, we girls were born only 11 months apart. The crowd was growing as the evening was coming in, and singing and hollering and whooping and dancing jigs, in groups of people cheering whenever a new item was thrown on the fire. It was pretty wild and I didn't see many children on the park strip. Notably the people greeted each other by name since they knew one another! There were a lot of people there. Later I was taught the "Alaska Flag" song in school. The flag was said to have been designed by Bennie Benson, but the truth was his school teacher designed it to help him submit something, and I think she was happy he unexpectedly won the award with her simple design; she didn't complain when her student got credit for her design. My mom showed me the Anchorage Times newspaper which read "WE'RE IN!" we kept a copy of that paper for more than 20 years. The heat from the bonfire was so hot it burned our faces and kept us warm - finally my sister Lisa began to get too cold so our folks bundled us off to the house our grandparents built on the very corner of downtown Anchorage where the legal buildings are now, near the statue of Captain Cook. "8 Stars of Gold on a field of Blue..." I had wonderful teachers. I stayed true. From the time I was a babe in arms we had a visitor by the name of Yule Kilcher. He was a state senator and one of the most fascinating people I have ever known. I asked him once how many languages he spoke and he took a minute to count them all up and said - "if you include the dialects - it's 47." 47!!! Yule helped to write the Alaska State Constitution, and he stood for liberal causes in a conservative way. People now have forgotten that Alaska was once a liberal state, and it was the conservatives who opposed statehood. The summer I turned 13 years old Yule took me to visit his farm down in Homer, driving like a mad man around each curve of the road which he knew every bit of from memory. Every where we stopped Yule spoke to the people in their native languages - and what a diverse set of people he knew - it was just everyone - speaking in Norwegian, Lap, Danish, Finnish, German, Russian, and French, and everyone was so happy to see him and asked us to stay if only for a bite, or tea, or sometimes a sauna! It was one of my most memorable life experiences as I met people from all over the world visiting Yule at his ranch, and his children and other family members and neighbors. I credit Yule with changing my world view completely. So this photo was taken of the US Flag and Alaska State flag in front of the top floor fireplace in the Anchorage Pioneer's Home with the Christmas tree, when I was just visiting my mom for Christmas (thank you to the excellent staff there). Myself if I were to die today I could honestly say that I have lived a completely unique and unusual life due to being raised in Alaska, and knowing the people I have been fortunate to meet like Senator Bob Bartlett, who was greatly responsible for Alaska becoming a state of the United States of America, Karin and Honorable James Fitzgerald (U.S. Senior Judge) and family - Dennis, Denise, Debra, and Kevin, Glo and Victor Fischer and family - Yonnie, the Listons - Bill and Helen, Mike, Mary, Lissa, Gene Guess and family, the O'Malley's, Ernest Gruening (Governor Alaska Territory), and Alaska State senator Yule Kilcher, his children, Wendell Kay - Edd
alaska airlines treats
alaska airlines treats
most airlines don't give you food, which is pretty lame. maybe they'll offer you an old crappy sandwich or some greasy potato chips for like $10, but Alaska airlines had this fun box of treats for $5. it was fun. i enjoyed it. the end.

cheap airfare alaska
cheap airfare alaska
A woman who went to Alaska
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