SUGAR COOKIE ICING THAT HARDENS : SUGAR COOKIE ICING

Sugar Cookie Icing That Hardens : Cooking Rice In Pressure Cooker : Leeann Chin Cookbook.

Sugar Cookie Icing That Hardens


sugar cookie icing that hardens
    sugar cookie
  • cookies sprinkled with granulated sugar
  • A sugar cookie is a cookie made from sugar, flour, butter, eggs, vanilla, and either baking powder or baking soda. Sugar cookies may be formed by hand or rolled and cut into shapes. They are commonly decorated with frosting, sprinkles, or a combination of both.
  • (Sugar Cookies (film)) Sugar Cookies (also known as Love Me My Way) is a 1973 soft-core crime film directed by Theodore Gershuny. It was co-written by future president of Troma Entertainment Lloyd Kaufman and produced by future director Oliver Stone.
    hardens
  • Make or become hard or harder
  • (harden) season: make fit; "This trip will season even the hardiest traveller"
  • Make or become more severe and less sympathetic
  • Make or become tougher and more clearly defined
  • (harden) become hard or harder; "The wax hardened"
  • temper: harden by reheating and cooling in oil; "temper steel"
    icing
  • (ice hockey) the act of shooting the puck from within your own defensive area the length of the rink beyond the opponent's goal
  • A mixture of sugar with liquid or butter, typically flavored and colored, and used as a coating for cakes or cookies
  • The action of shooting the puck from one's own end of the rink to the other but not into the goal, for which the referee calls a face-off in one's own end
  • frost: the formation of frost or ice on a surface
  • The formation of ice on an aircraft, ship, or other vehicle, or in an engine
  • frosting: a flavored sugar topping used to coat and decorate cakes

Complete Plate of Gingerbread
Complete Plate of Gingerbread
Gingerbread Recipe: # 3 1/4 cups sifted all-purpose flour # 3/4 teaspoon baking soda # 3/4 cup (1 1/2 sticks) unsalted butter (room temperature, softened) # 1/2 cup dark-brown sugar, packed # 2 teaspoons ground ginger # 2 teaspoons ground cinnamon # 1/2 teaspoons ground cloves *optional - I usually up the cinnamon a bit and skip this # scant 1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg # 1/4 teaspoon finely ground black pepper * I go less than this, personally # 1/2 teaspoon salt # 1 large egg # 1/2 cup unsulfured molasses Instructions: 1. In a large bowl, sift together flour, baking soda, and spices. Adding a little extra flour makes these cookies very soft. Set this bowl aside. 2 According to the official recipe, in electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, cream the butter - I do my mixing by hand, because I am a martyr. Add sugar and beat until fluffy. Mix in eggs and molasses. Gradually add the flour mixture; combine on low speed, or if you are mixing by hand, stir at slow speed - not that you would be able to stir this fast - this is a serious workout. (You may need to work it with your hands to incorporate the last bit of flour, if you are using a Kitchenaid, like a normal person.) Divide dough in thirds; shape the thirds into flat bricks and wrap each third in plastic. Chill for at least 1 hour-2 hours. Before rolling out, let sit at room temperature for a few minutes. If after refrigerating the dough feels too soft to roll-out, work in a little more flour. If you like a little flavour in your gingerbread, try rubbing your cutting board or rolling pins or hands with a very, very small bit of flavouring - chocolate liquers are nice, as are cointreau or straight orange flavouring. Blood orange would be nice, too, especially on the ones dipped in chocolate. 3 Heat oven to 350°. I have a large wooden board that I use to roll my cookies out on, which I cover with flour - a cutting board would work well too. Using a rolling pin, roll dough - not too thin - I usually do mine about half a centimetre or more. Use a cookie cutter to cut into desired shapes. 4 Transfer to baking sheets - I line mine with parchment paper and bake the cookies on that, to keep the bottoms from hardening and going dark. Bake about 6-8 minutes, until cookies are still soft. Remove from oven and let the cookies sit on the cookie sheet on top of the oven for a few minutes more to set. Move to a wire rack to cool completely. How do you make cookies soft? Easy: cut them thick, underbake slightly, and let them finish baking on top of the stove while they set on the cookie sheet. if you like them crispier, bake 8-10 minutes, until the edges start to brown. ICING - this is straight from Martha Stewart Puzzle Cookie Royal Icing - Makes 2 1/3 cups 1 one-pound box (about 4 cups) confectioners’ sugar 5 tablespoons meringue powder,** 1/2 cup water 1. with a hand mixer, combine confectioners’ sugar and meringue powder or egg whites. Mixing on low speed, add a scant 1/2 cup water drop by drop. For a thinner consistency, usually used for flooding, add more water. A thicker consistency is generally used for further embellishing. Mix until icing holds a ribbon-like trail on the surface for five seconds when you raise the paddle. ** some people make icing with egg whites, but there are a lot of people (the pregnant, immuno-compromised, etc) who cannot eat raw eggs, so in the interest of not asking random acquaintances about the current contents of their uterus, I opt for meringue powder. Chocolate Dipped. Melt chocolate. Dip cookies. Eat. This one is pretty easy.
the annual ginger event has occurred
the annual ginger event has occurred
Crystallized Gingerroot From - Preserving The Taste – by Edon Waycott When you make an preserved gingerroot recipe, it is important to start with the very young or “yellow” gingerroot that is available in Chinese markets (and some supermarkets) in January and February and again in July and August. This gingerroot is very tender and moist, not so fibrous, with a thin pale skin tinged with pink. Crystallized gingerroot can be eaten as is or chopped and stirred into to ice cream or added to cookie or scone dough. It will keep indefinitely in a sealed container. This is an adaptation of a recipe by Bruce Cost from his book, Ginger East to West. Makes 1 ? pounds 1 ? pounds young gingerroot 1 ? cup sugar 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice dash salt additional sugar for coating , if desired 1. Cover the gingerroot, unpeeled, with cold water and soak overnight. 2. Drain, cover with fresh water, and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat and simmer for 10 minutes. Drain and cool. Peel the gingerroot and cut into 1/8 inch “coins”. Cover with water and simmer for 10 minutes. Drain and repeat, and drain again. 3. Place the sugar, lemon juice and salt in a medium saucepan with 2 ? cups water and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer until the sugar is dissolved. Add the gingerroot pieces, bring to a boil again, reduce the heat and simmer for 5 minutes. Turn off the heat and allow the gingerroot to stand in the syrup for at least 1 hour. 4. Return to heat and simmer, stirring occasionally, for at least 30 minutes, or until almost all of the liquid is absorbed. Begin stirring constantly. When almost all of the syrup has been absorbed and the gingerroot pieces are nearly dry, remove the pan from the heat and continue stirring for 5 more minutes more. 5. Remove the pieces with small tongs or chopsticks to sheets of wax paper to cool and harden. The gingerroot can also be rolled in sugar when cool enough to handle. Store in an airtight container away from the reach of ginger addicts.

sugar cookie icing that hardens
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