INSTRUCTIONS TO MAKE ROMAN SHADES. MAKE ROMAN SHADES

Instructions To Make Roman Shades. Patio Sliding Door Blinds. White Wood Shutters

Instructions To Make Roman Shades


instructions to make roman shades
    roman shades
  • (Roman shade) A flat fabric shade that folds into neat horizontal pleats when raised.
  • (Roman Shade) This window treatment style consists of a fabric shade with wooden slats inserted horizontally at intervals down its entire length. It is raised and lowered via pull cord as with other blinds, but gathers soft folds as it does so.
  • (Roman Shade) A single sheet shade that rises up by lift cord in a tear drop or flat style that looks like an accordion folding up back and forth on itself. Reminds me of an opera house window treatment swag. Part of our Melhanna Shade collection.
    instructions
  • Directions to a lawyer or to a jury
  • A code or sequence in a computer program that defines an operation and puts it into effect
  • (instruction) education: the activities of educating or instructing; activities that impart knowledge or skill; "he received no formal education"; "our instruction was carefully programmed"; "good classroom teaching is seldom rewarded"
  • (instruction) direction: a message describing how something is to be done; "he gave directions faster than she could follow them"
  • A direction or order
  • instruction manual: a manual usually accompanying a technical device and explaining how to install or operate it
    make
  • The manufacturer or trade name of a particular product
  • The making of electrical contact
  • The structure or composition of something
  • brand: a recognizable kind; "there's a new brand of hero in the movies now"; "what make of car is that?"
  • engage in; "make love, not war"; "make an effort"; "do research"; "do nothing"; "make revolution"
  • give certain properties to something; "get someone mad"; "She made us look silly"; "He made a fool of himself at the meeting"; "Don't make this into a big deal"; "This invention will make you a millionaire"; "Make yourself clear"

The Most Sensational Hijra Beauty of India
The Most Sensational Hijra  Beauty of India
The Moods of a Hijda For other uses, see Henna (disambiguation).Henna Lawsonia inermis Scientific classification Kingdom:Plantae Division:Magnoliophyta Class:Magnoliopsida Order:Myrtales Family:Lythraceae Genus:Lawsonia Species:L. inermis Binomial name Lawsonia inermis L. Henna or Hina (Lawsonia inermis, syn. L. alba) is a flowering plant, the sole species in the genus Lawsonia in the family Lythraceae. It is native to tropical and subtropical regions of Africa, southern Asia, and northern Australasia in semi-arid zones. Henna is a tall shrub or small tree, 2–6 m high. It is glabrous, multibranched with spine tipped branchlets. Leaves are opposite, entire, glabrous, sub-sessile, elliptical, and broadly lanceolate (1.5–5.0 cm x 0.5–2 cm), acuminate, having depressed veins on the dorsal surface. During the onset of precipitation intervals, the plant grows rapidly; putting out new shoots, then growth slows. The leaves gradually yellow and fall during prolonged dry or cool intervals. Henna flowers have four sepals and a 2 mm calyx tube with 3 mm spread lobes. Petals are obvate, white or red stamens inserted in pairs on the rim of the calyx tube. Ovary is four celled, style up to 5 mm long and erect. Fruits are small, brownish capsules, 4–8 mm in diameter, with 32–49 seeds per fruit, and open irregularly into four splits.[1] Lawsone content in leaves is negatively associated with the number of seeds in the fruits.[2]Contents [hide] 1 Cultivation and uses 2 Preparation and application of paste 3 Traditions of henna as body art 4 Health effects 5 Black henna 6 References 7 See also 8 External links [edit] Cultivation and uses Small Henna plant Henna, Lawsonia inermis, produces a red-orange dye molecule, lawsone. This molecule has an affinity for bonding with protein, and thus has been used to dye skin, hair, fingernails, leather, silk and wool. Henna's indigenous zone is the tropical savannah and tropical arid zone, in latitudes between 15° and 25° N and S from Africa to the western Pacific rim, and produces highest dye content in temperatures between 35°C and 45°C. It does not thrive where minimum temperatures are below 11°C. Temperatures below 5°C will kill the henna plant. The dye molecule, lawsone, is primarily concentrated in the leaves, and is in the highest levels in the petioles of the leaf. Products sold as "black henna" or "neutral henna" are not made from henna, but may be derived from indigo (in the plant Indigofera tinctoria) or Cassia obovata, and may contain unlisted dyes and chemicals.[3] Henna is commercially cultivated in western India, Pakistan, Morocco, Yemen, Iran, Afghanistan, Somalia, Sudan and Libya. Presently the Pali district of Rajasthan is the most heavily cultivated henna production area in India, with over 100 henna processors operating in Sojat City. Though henna has been used for body art and hair dye since the Bronze Age, henna has had a recent renaissance in body art due to improvements in cultivation, processing, and the diasporas of people from traditional henna using regions. [4] The word "henna" comes from the Arabic name for Lawsonia inermis, pronounced /hinna??/ or colloquially /hinna/. In the Bible's Song of Songs and Song of Solomon, henna is referred to as Camphire. Henna for sale at the Egyptian Bazaar in Istanbul In the Indian subcontinent, there are many variant words such as Mehndi in North India, Pakistan and Bangladesh. In Telugu (India, Malaysia, USA), it is known as Gorintaaku. In Tamil (South India, Singapore, Malaysia, Sri Lanka) it is called "Marudhaani" and is used as ground fresh leaves rather than as dried powder. It is used in various festivals and celebrations and used by women and children. It is left on overnight and will last one month or more depending on the plant and how well it was ground and how long it is left on. Henna has many traditional and commercial uses, the most common being as a dye for hair, skin and fingernails, as a dye and preservative for leather and cloth, and as an anti-fungal.[5] Henna was used as a hair dye in Indian court records around 400 CE,[6] in Rome during the Roman Empire, and in Spain during Convivienca.[7] It was listed in the medical texts of the Ebers Papyrus (16th c BCE Egypt)[8] and by Ibn Qayyim al-Jawziyya (14th c CE (Syria and Egypt) as a medicinal herb.[9] In Morocco, wool is dyed and ornamented with henna, as are drumheads and other leather goods. Henna will repel some insect pests and mildew. The United States Food and Drug Administration has not approved henna for direct application to the skin. It is unconditionally approved as a hair dye, and can only be imported for that purpose.[10] Henna imported into the USA which appears to be for use as body art is subject to seizure, and at present it is illegal to use henna for body art in the U.S.,[11] though prosecution is rare. The fast black stains of “black henna” are not made with henna, but are fr

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