AMERICAN DRAPERY - AMERICAN

American Drapery - Bridge Lamp Shades - Used Canopy Beds.

American Drapery


american drapery
    american
  • The English language as it is used in the United States; American English
  • a native or inhabitant of the United States
  • A native or citizen of the United States
  • A native or inhabitant of any of the countries of North, South, or Central America
  • of or relating to or characteristic of the continents and islands of the Americas; "the American hemisphere"; "American flora and fauna"
  • of or relating to the United States of America or its people or language or culture; "American citizens"; "American English"; "the American dream"
    drapery
  • Cloth coverings hanging in loose folds
  • cloth gracefully draped and arranged in loose folds
  • Long curtains of heavy fabric
  • curtain: hanging cloth used as a blind (especially for a window)
  • Drapery is a general word referring to cloths or textiles (Old French drap, from Late Latin drappus ). It may refer to cloth used for decorative purposes - such as around windows - or to the trade of retailing cloth, originally mostly for clothing, formerly conducted by drapers.
  • The artistic arrangement of clothing in sculpture or painting
american drapery - Curtain Tiebacks-Scroll
Curtain Tiebacks-Scroll Ends! Pair--Amish Made Wrought Iron
Curtain Tiebacks-Scroll Ends! Pair--Amish Made Wrought Iron
Our hand wrought iron pieces are made for us in the Lancaster County PA. Amish Community. With classic style and functional design these versatile pieces blend into most decorating schemes. This is solid iron--not wire. These pieces are finished in satin black and work well in any room. Screws or wall anchors are not included. These are our new hand forged loop end curtain tiebacks. These work well as swag holders too. The scroll design matches our curtain rods!! (search for amazon items B0002B035Y and B0002AZWZQ) These can be used with the scrolls pointing up or down. Each tie back measures approximately 3 1/2" wide by 2" high and 4" out from the wall.

82% (6)
Seligmann, Kurt (1900-1962) - 1935 Painting which Prefers the D to the R (Kunstmuseum Bern, Switzerland)
Seligmann, Kurt (1900-1962) - 1935 Painting which Prefers the D to the R (Kunstmuseum Bern, Switzerland)
Oil on plywood; 149.6 x 180.5 cm. Kurt Seligmann was a Swiss-American Surrealist painter and engraver. Born in Basel he was the son of a successful Furniture Department store owner. After study at the Ecole des Beaux Arts, Geneva, and several unhappy years working in his father's business in Basel, Seligmann left for Paris where he looked up his old friends from Geneva, the sculptor Alberto Giacometti and the art critic Pierre Courthion. Through Giacometti he met Hans Arp and Jean Helion, who admired his sinister biomorphic paintings and invited him to join their group, Abstraction-Creation Art Non-Figuratif. In the mid-1930s his work began to take on a more baroque aspect, as he animated the prancing figures in his paintings and etchings with festoons of ribbons, drapery and heraldic paraphernalia. It was about this time (1935) that he married Arlette Paraf, a granddaughter of the founder of the Wildenstein Gallery. Together they traveled extensively, first around the world (a year-long honey-moon trip in 1936) and then to North America and British Columbia (1938). In 1937, Seligmann was formally accepted as a member of the Surrealist group in Paris by Andre Breton, who collected his work. At the outbreak of World War Seligmann was the first European Surrealist to arrive in New York, ostensibly for an exhibition of his work. Once there, he began a concerted effort to aid his Surrealist colleagues left behind in France and bring them to safety. Seligmann's art continued to evolve and really matured in the 1940s in the United States, where he did his best work. Beginning in 1940, he and Arlette lived at the Beaux Arts Building at 40th Street in New York, and later acquired a farm north of the city in the hamlet of Sugar Loaf, in Orange County. Seligmann befriended many American artists and became a close friend of the art historian Meyer Schapiro. With Schapiro as author, he produced in 1944 a limited edition set of six etchings illustrating the Myth of Oedipus, surely his masterpiece in this medium and one of the greatest works of Surrealist printmaking. As the Surrealists' expert on magic, he also wrote The History of Magic : The Mirror of Magic (Pantheon Books, 1948). Mythology and esoterica always informed the fascinating and turbulent imagery of his "dance macabre" paintings, and his work began to be exhibited widely and acquired by museums throughout the United States and Europe after the war. Seligmann taught for many years at various colleges around New York, particularly at Brooklyn College, from which he retired in 1958. The changing nature of the New York art world toward an embracement of Abstract Expressionism caused his work to be relegated to past history. Due to illness, he gave up his New York apartment and retired to his farm, where he died of an accidental self-inflicted gunshot wound in 1962.
Seligmann, Kurt (1900-1962) - 1932 La Turque (Kunsthaus Zug, Switzerland)
Seligmann, Kurt (1900-1962) - 1932 La Turque (Kunsthaus Zug, Switzerland)
Oil on canvas; 61 x 50 cm. Kurt Seligmann was a Swiss-American Surrealist painter and engraver. Born in Basel he was the son of a successful Furniture Department store owner. After study at the Ecole des Beaux Arts, Geneva, and several unhappy years working in his father's business in Basel, Seligmann left for Paris where he looked up his old friends from Geneva, the sculptor Alberto Giacometti and the art critic Pierre Courthion. Through Giacometti he met Hans Arp and Jean Helion, who admired his sinister biomorphic paintings and invited him to join their group, Abstraction-Creation Art Non-Figuratif. In the mid-1930s his work began to take on a more baroque aspect, as he animated the prancing figures in his paintings and etchings with festoons of ribbons, drapery and heraldic paraphernalia. It was about this time (1935) that he married Arlette Paraf, a granddaughter of the founder of the Wildenstein Gallery. Together they traveled extensively, first around the world (a year-long honey-moon trip in 1936) and then to North America and British Columbia (1938). In 1937, Seligmann was formally accepted as a member of the Surrealist group in Paris by Andre Breton, who collected his work. At the outbreak of World War Seligmann was the first European Surrealist to arrive in New York, ostensibly for an exhibition of his work. Once there, he began a concerted effort to aid his Surrealist colleagues left behind in France and bring them to safety. Seligmann's art continued to evolve and really matured in the 1940s in the United States, where he did his best work. Beginning in 1940, he and Arlette lived at the Beaux Arts Building at 40th Street in New York, and later acquired a farm north of the city in the hamlet of Sugar Loaf, in Orange County. Seligmann befriended many American artists and became a close friend of the art historian Meyer Schapiro. With Schapiro as author, he produced in 1944 a limited edition set of six etchings illustrating the Myth of Oedipus, surely his masterpiece in this medium and one of the greatest works of Surrealist printmaking. As the Surrealists' expert on magic, he also wrote The History of Magic : The Mirror of Magic (Pantheon Books, 1948). Mythology and esoterica always informed the fascinating and turbulent imagery of his "dance macabre" paintings, and his work began to be exhibited widely and acquired by museums throughout the United States and Europe after the war. Seligmann taught for many years at various colleges around New York, particularly at Brooklyn College, from which he retired in 1958. The changing nature of the New York art world toward an embracement of Abstract Expressionism caused his work to be relegated to past history. Due to illness, he gave up his New York apartment and retired to his farm, where he died of an accidental self-inflicted gunshot wound in 1962.

american drapery
american drapery
American Living Draperies, Midnight Mist Shade - Chocolate, Coral, White
American Living draperies add understated glamour and elegance to your windows. Sewn-in metallic accents create a subtle sheen. American Living draperies: gently filters light sophisticated neutral colors tie-up shade creates soft look, accented by bows 54Wx57inch L tie-up shade is sold individually. Measured from the top of the rod pocket down, exclusive of header. Order 2-3 times window width for fullness. Shirr on a 1inch clear rod or decorative pole. Polyester. Washable. Imported. Available in colors: Chocolate, Coral, Honey, Light Sage, Lilac, Soft Cream, Wedgewood, White.

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