Joe J. Orendorff, Bombardier, 100th BG, 349th Sq.

"Captain Joe J. Orendorff was a bombardier in the 8th Air Force, 100th Bomb Group, 349th Squadron.
Captain Orendorff flew out of Thorpe Abbott, England. His flying career began October 1944 and ended in April 1945. During his tour he flew 29 missions and 19 of those Captain Orendorff flew as the lead bombardier." ( Source: Air Expo 2002 Heroes and Legends event program.)
 
The 100th BG web site has his crew photo.flight crew and a photo of "EZ Goin" after a mission and additional information about the John H. Williams crew:
:
2nd Lt JOHN H. WILLIAMS P CPT 5 APR 45 NURNBURG
2nd Lt ARTHUR G. LARSON, JR. CP KIA 31 MAR 45 ZEITZ, OIL REFINERY
2nd Lt JACK E. WILD NAV CPT 5 APR 45 NURNBURG
2nd Lt JOSEPH J. ORENDORF BOM CPT 5 APR 45 NURNBURG
SGT DON O.R. SELLWOOD TTE CPT 5 APR 45 NURNBURG
SGT STEPHEN J. MAJCHRZAK ROG CPT 5 APR 45 NURNBURG
SGT WILLARD P. BOSTROM BTG KIA 31 MAR 45 ZEITZ, OIL REFINERY
SGT AUGUST J. KOCIOLEK WG CPT 5 APR 45 NURNBURG
SGT JOHN J. OBUCHOWSKI WG CPT 5 APR 45 NURNBURG
SGT GEORGE E. SLAWIK TG CPT 5 APR 45 NURNBURG

349th Sqdn. This crew, as above joined the 100th Group on 23 Aug 44.

Flew nine missions as a "regular" crew and 20 missions as a Pathfinder Crew. When named a PFF crew (4 Dec 44), Art Larsen & Will Bostrom were removed from the crew, Larsen to take over his own crew and since the BTG was not carried on the PFF aircraft Bostrom went with Larsen. Both were KIA the last day of March 1945 at Zeitz.

Crew left the U.S. from Camp Kilmer, N. J. aboard the S.S. Brazil & ten days later docked in Liverpool, Eng. Returning to states, left South Hampton, Eng on V. E. Day, aboard the USS Kingfisher bound for Boston."

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From the Yuma Sun.com
"Bombardier returns to Yuma home base

October 13, 2009 6:00 PM

He was part of the the Army Air Corps heavy bombardment unit known as the "Bloody 100th," and 60 years later, Yuma High School alumnus Joe Orendorff finally got back to his home base.

Orendorff, a 1939 graduate, returned to Yuma after serving as a B-17 bombardier in the 100th Bomb Group, 349th squadron, which flew 29 missions over Germany between October 1944 and April 1945. In 1949, he left Yuma on a job transfer for the Northrup King Seed Co. This week, he returned home for the first time in 60 years.

John Harris, Yuma High School social studies department chair, invited Orendorff to speak to his classes at Snider Auditorium of his experiences in Yuma during the Great Depression and World War II.

Harris called this period the dark days of U.S. history. But he said that Orendorff's personal story is a part of history and his presentation at Snider is a great event that the whole community should honor.

"Once a Criminal always a Criminal," Harris said of Orendorff as he introduced him to a packed audience.

After screening a film chronicling the Army Air Corps' intensified bombing campaign over Nazi-led Germany, Orendorff informed his audience about what it was like growing up during Depression-era Yuma. His family had a 50-acre farm where they raised mostly alfalfa and dairy cattle, so they never went hungry, he recalled.

"People came from Kansas and Oklahoma. Trains were loaded with people riding the rails. It was pretty bad times and there was no work."

When the attack at Pearl Harbor occurred, Orendorff was working for Northrup at its Blythe office. Soon he found himself training as part of a B-17 crew stationed in Thorpe Abbott, England.

He was trained as a gunner but eventually took over as bombardier, which has more control over what happens, he said. In 29 missions, where many of his targets were fuel storage tanks, Orendorff recalled, he was never injured. His plane was damaged while flying over Cologne, Germany, but he was able to return to base safely.

Anthony Cicchino, 16, a U.S. history student, said he thought it was great Orendorff took time off from his life to talk about important events in the country's history.

"It was great to have firsthand experience from someone actually in the war. He's obviously a courageous guy, an inspiration. He risked his life for us and he can influence people about going into the Air Force."

Pat Blake, Orendorff's daughter, accompanied him to Yuma. Blake was born in Yuma but left at 5 years old when Orendorff was transferred by his employer to Fresno and later to Minnesota, where he lives now in Columbia Heights. He served as city councilman there for eight years, and four years ago, the city named a street, Orendorff Way, in his honor.

Blake said her father wanted to return to Yuma to see the old landmarks and also visit with family members buried at Desert Lawn cemetery. She said her father also wanted to let the students know that freedom comes with a price.

"I want them to learn that freedom isn't cheap," Orendorff said. "Hitler was killing all the Jews, and millions lost their lives because of World War II. I want them to know the cost of freedom"

Harris said he wanted to invite Orendorff back to his alma mater to honor him.

"This is one of our heroes. This is a local individual worthy of respect. We have a wonderful history and I wanted our kids to have a wonderful opportunity. I hope this helps students bring history alive."

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ON A MISSION

Capt. Joe J. Orendorff, a bombardier with the 8th Air Force 100th Bomb Group, 349th Squadron, took part in 29 missions over Germany during World War II, 19 of which he was the lead bombardier.

1. Oct. 3, 1944 - Nurnberg tank factory
2. Oct. 9, 1944 - Mainz marshaling yards
3. Oct. 12, 1944 - Bremen aircraft factory
4. Oct. 15, 1944 - Cologne marshaling yards
5. Oct. 17, 1944 - Cologne marshaling yards
6. Oct. 18, 1944 - Kassel aero engines
7. Oct. 19, 1944 - Ludwigshaven secondary target
8. Oct. 30, 1944 - Western Germany, secondary target
9. Nov. 9, 1944 - Saarbracken marshaling yards (one man lost)
10. Dec. 4, 1944 - Friedburg marshaling yards
11. Dec. 29, 1944 - Frankfurt marshaling yards
12. Dec. 30, 1944 - Kassel marshaling yards
13. Jan. 5, 1945 - Frankfurt marshaling yards
14. Jan. 20, 1945 - Derben storage tanks
15. Jan. 20, 1945 - Hellbrom marshaling yards
16. Feb. 3, 1945 - City of Berlin (36 men lost)
17. Feb. 6, 1945 - Chemnitz factory district
18. Feb. 8, 1945 - Weimer arms works
19. Feb. 14, 1945 - Chemnitz factory district
20. Feb. 19, 1945 - Osnabruck marshaling yards
21. Feb. 20, 1945 - Nurnberg marshaling yards
22. Feb. 22, 1945 - Western Germany marshaling yards
23. Feb. 23, 1945 - Trenchtlingen marshaling yards
24. Feb. 28, 1945 - Kassel marshaling yards
25. March 15, 1945 - Wittenberge marshaling yards
26. March 21, 1945 - Plauen machine works (nine men lost)
27. March 30, 1945 - Hamburg ship yards
28. April 3, 1945 - Kiel sub yards (10 men lost)
29. April 5, 1945 - Nurnberg marshaling yards (nine men lost)



Read more: http://www.yumasun.com/articles/yards-53483-marshaling-orendorff.html#ixzz2MpLuvsyk"

itz.

Crew left the U.S. from Camp Kilmer, N. J. aboard the S.S. Brazil & ten days later docked in Liverpool, Eng. Returning to states, left South Hampton, Eng on V. E. Day, aboard the USS Kingfisher bound for Boston

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