LIFT UP THE TRUMPET : LIFT UP

LIFT UP THE TRUMPET : TAPS MUSIC SHEET FOR TRUMPET : PICS OF MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS.

Lift Up The Trumpet


lift up the trumpet
    lift up
  • pick up: take and lift upward
  • elate: fill with high spirits; fill with optimism; "Music can uplift your spirits"
  • ahebban (sv 7); hebban; r?ran
    trumpet
  • An organ reed stop with a quality resembling that of a trumpet
  • A brass musical instrument with a flared bell and a bright, penetrating tone. The modern instrument has the tubing looped to form a straight-sided coil, with three valves
  • play or blow on the trumpet
  • cornet: a brass musical instrument with a brilliant tone; has a narrow tube and a flared bell and is played by means of valves
  • proclaim on, or as if on, a trumpet; "Liberals like to trumpet their opposition to the death penalty"
  • Something shaped like a trumpet, esp. the tubular corona of a daffodil flower
lift up the trumpet - Lift Up
Lift Up Your Voice Like a Trumpet: White Clergy and the Civil Rights and Antiwar Movements, 1954-1973
Lift Up Your Voice Like a Trumpet: White Clergy and the Civil Rights and Antiwar Movements, 1954-1973
When the Supreme Court declared in 1954 that segregated public schools were unconstitutional, the highest echelons of Protestant, Catholic, and Jewish religious organizations enthusiastically supported the ruling, and black civil rights workers expected and actively sought the cooperation of their white religious cohorts. Many white southern clergy, however, were outspoken in their defense of segregation, and even those who supported integration were wary of risking their positions by urging parishioners to act on their avowed religious beliefs in a common humanity. Those who did so found themselves abandoned by friends, attacked by white supremacists, and often driven from their communities.
Michael Friedland here offers a collective biography of several southern and nationally known white religious leaders who did step forward to join the major social protest movements of the mid-twentieth century, lending their support first to the civil rights movement and later to protests over American involvement in Vietnam. Profiling such activists as William Sloane Coffin Jr., Daniel and Philip Berrigan, Abraham Joshua Heschel, Eugene Carson Blake, Robert McAfee Brown, and Will D. Campbell, he reveals the passions and commitment behind their involvement in these protests and places their actions in the context of a burgeoning ecumenical movement.

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Nowrooz 1388
Nowrooz 1388
In harmony with the rebirth of nature, the Iranian New Year Celebration, or Nowruz/Norooz, always begins on the first day of spring. Nowruz/Norooz ceremonies are symbolic representations of two ancient concepts - the End and the Rebirth; or Good and Evil. A few weeks before the New Year, Iranians clean and rearrange their homes. They make new clothes, bake pastries and germinate seeds as sign of renewal. The ceremonial cloth is set up in each household. Troubadours, referred to as Haji Firuz, disguise themselves with makeup and wear brightly colored outfits of satin. These Haji Firuz, singing and dancing, parade as a carnival through the streets with tambourines, kettle drums, and trumpets to spread good cheer and the news of the coming new year. The origins of Nowruz/Noroozare unknown, but they go back several thousand years predating the Achaemenian Dynasty. The ancient Iranians had a festival called "Farvardgan" which lasted ten days, and took place at the end of the solar year. It appears that this was a festival of sorrow and mourning, signifying the end of life while the festival of Nowruz/Norooz, at the beginning of spring signified rebirth, and was a time of great joy and celebration. The other ancient symbolic representation of Nowruz/Norooz is based around the idea of the triumph of good over evil. According to the Shah-nameh (The Book of Kings), the national Iranian epic by Ferdowsi, Nowruz/Norooz came into being during the reign of the mythical King Jamshid; when he defeated the evil demons (divs) seizing their treasures, becoming master of everything but the heavens and bringing prosperity to his people. To reach the heavens, Jamshid ordered a throne to be built with the jewels he had captured. He then sat on the throne and commanded the demons to lift him up into the sky. When the sun's rays hit the throne, the sky was illuminated with a multitude of colours. The people were amazed at the King's power and they showered him with even more jewels and treasures. This day of great celebration was named Nowruz/Norooz, and was recognised as the first day of the year...
Happy New Year to Iranian
Happy New Year to Iranian
In harmony with the rebirth of nature, the Iranian New Year Celebration, or NOROOZ, always begins on the first day of spring. Nowruz ceremonies are symbolic representations of two ancient concepts - the End and the Rebirth; or Good and Evil. A few weeks before the New Year, Iranians clean and rearrange their homes. They make new clothes, bake pastries and germinate seeds as sign of renewal. The ceremonial cloth is set up in each household. Troubadours, referred to as Haji Firuz, disguise themselves with makeup and wear brightly colored outfits of satin. These Haji Firuz, singing and dancing, parade as a carnival through the streets with tambourines, kettle drums, and trumpets to spread good cheer and the news of the coming new year. The origins of NoRuz are unknown, but they go back several thousand years predating the Achaemenian Dynasty. The ancient Iranians had a festival called "Farvardgan" which lasted ten days, and took place at the end of the solar year. It appears that this was a festival of sorrow and mourning, signifying the end of life while the festival of NoRuz, at the beginning of spring signified rebirth, and was a time of great joy and celebration. The other ancient symbolic representation of NoRuz is based around the idea of the triumph of good over evil. According to the Shah-nameh (The Book of Kings), the national Iranian epic by Ferdowsi, NoRuz came into being during the reign of the mythical King Jamshid; when he defeated the evil demons (divs) seizing their treasures, becoming master of everything but the heavens and bringing prosperity to his people. To reach the heavens, Jamshid ordered a throne to be built with the jewels he had captured. He then sat on the throne and commanded the demons to lift him up into the sky. When the sun's rays hit the throne, the sky was illuminated with a multitude of colours. The people were amazed at the King's power and they showered him with even more jewels and treasures. This day of great celebration was named NoRuz, and was recognised as the first day of the year...

lift up the trumpet
lift up the trumpet
Hail Thee, Festival Day: Christians, Lift Up Your Hearts (Handbell Sheet Music, Handbell 3-6 octaves)
Options abound in this flexible arrangement: it stands alone for handbell choir, but also offers optional parts for organ and/or trumpet. If desired, this setting may be used to accompany the choir/congregation in singing the hymn from your hymnal of choice. The repeats within the piece are designed to accommodate congregational singing, and a provision is made for additional repeats if more stanzas are desired. The repeats may be omitted when singers are not involved. Each stanza offers a new texture before returning to the joyful refrain. / Handbell Sheet Music / Handbell 3-6 octaves / Optional Organ, Trumpet, Handchimes 3-5 octaves, Congregation / Ascension, Eastertide, General, Pentecost

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