TIRE SELECTOR GUIDE - TIRE SELECTOR

Tire Selector Guide - Jensen Tire Bellevue.

Tire Selector Guide


tire selector guide
    selector
  • A person or thing that selects something, in particular
  • picker: a person who chooses or selects out
  • Selector is the term originally used for a reggae/dancehall disc jockey (who selects a riddim).
  • A device for selecting a particular gear or other setting of a machine or device
  • a switch that is used to select among alternatives
    guide
  • usher: someone employed to conduct others
  • A professional mountain climber in charge of a group
  • steer: direct the course; determine the direction of travelling
  • A person who advises or shows the way to others
  • A thing that helps someone to form an opinion or make a decision or calculation
  • lead: take somebody somewhere; "We lead him to our chief"; "can you take me to the main entrance?"; "He conducted us to the palace"
    tire
  • Lose interest in; become bored with
  • hoop that covers a wheel; "automobile tires are usually made of rubber and filled with compressed air"
  • Cause to feel in need of rest or sleep; weary
  • lose interest or become bored with something or somebody; "I'm so tired of your mother and her complaints about my food"
  • exhaust or get tired through overuse or great strain or stress; "We wore ourselves out on this hike"
  • Become in need of rest or sleep; grow weary

Dingo In San Francisco (3 of 3)
Dingo In San Francisco (3 of 3)
A Daimler Dingo Scout Car in San Francisco's Marina district. Here you are looking at it from the back. The vision plate is, I assume, in case they needed to back up in a hurry. At the left you can also see a 'jump seat' to facilitate sitting almost literally on top of the car, presumably for when field of view and comfort were more important than armor protection. The owner rescued it from a British farm house, restored it, and now trots it out for events like Memorial Day Parades and British road rallies. For the historically challenged, this is courtesy of Wikipedia: In 1938 the British War Office issued a specification for a scouting vehicle. Out of three designs submitted by Alvis, BSA and Morris, the one by BSA was selected. The actual production was passed to Daimler, which was a vehicle manufacturer in the BSA group of companies. The vehicle was officially designated Daimler Scout Car, but became widely known as Dingo, which was the name of the competing Alvis prototype. Arguably one of the finest armoured fighting vehicles built in Britain during the war, the Dingo was a small two-man armoured car. It was well protected for its size with 30 mm of armour at the front. The engine was located at the rear of the vehicle. One of the ingenious features of Dingo was the transmission; a pre-selector gearbox and fluid flywheel that gave five-speeds in both directions. Original version had four-wheel steering; however this feature was dropped in Mk II because inexperienced drivers found the vehicle hard to control. Although the Dingo featured a flat plate beneath the chassis to slide across uneven ground, it was extremely vulnerable to mines. No spare wheel was carried, but it was not really necessary because of the use of run-flat (hollow) rubber tyres instead of pneumatic. Despite the hard tyres, the independent suspension gave it a very comfortable ride. A swivelling seat next to the driver allowed the other crew member to attend to the No. 19 radio or Bren gun when required. The Dingo was first used by the British Expeditionary Force (1st Armoured Division and 4th Northumberland Fusilers) during the Battle of France. It turned out to be so successful that no replacement was sought until 1952 with the production of the Daimler Ferret. In mid-70s the Dingo was still used by Cyprus and Portugal.
Dingo In San Francisco (2 of 3)
Dingo In San Francisco (2 of 3)
Dingo Scout Car in San Francisco's Marina district: just one more reason to love San Francisco. For the historically challenged, this is courtesy of Wikipedia: In 1938 the British War Office issued a specification for a scouting vehicle. Out of three designs submitted by Alvis, BSA and Morris, the one by BSA was selected. The actual production was passed to Daimler, which was a vehicle manufacturer in the BSA group of companies. The vehicle was officially designated Daimler Scout Car, but became widely known as Dingo, which was the name of the competing Alvis prototype. Arguably one of the finest armoured fighting vehicles built in Britain during the war, the Dingo was a small two-man armoured car. It was well protected for its size with 30 mm of armour at the front. The engine was located at the rear of the vehicle. One of the ingenious features of Dingo was the transmission; a pre-selector gearbox and fluid flywheel that gave five-speeds in both directions. Original version had four-wheel steering; however this feature was dropped in Mk II because inexperienced drivers found the vehicle hard to control. Although the Dingo featured a flat plate beneath the chassis to slide across uneven ground, it was extremely vulnerable to mines. No spare wheel was carried, but it was not really necessary because of the use of run-flat (hollow) rubber tyres instead of pneumatic. Despite the hard tyres, the independent suspension gave it a very comfortable ride. A swivelling seat next to the driver allowed the other crew member to attend to the No. 19 radio or Bren gun when required. The Dingo was first used by the British Expeditionary Force (1st Armoured Division and 4th Northumberland Fusilers) during the Battle of France. It turned out to be so successful that no replacement was sought until 1952 with the production of the Daimler Ferret. In mid-70s the Dingo was still used by Cyprus and Portugal.

tire selector guide
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