FOLD UP TABLE TOP. TABLE TOP

Fold Up Table Top. 48 Round Glass Table.

Fold Up Table Top


fold up table top
    table top
  • 1. A jump that is flat from the lip to the landing. 2. A BMX or mountain bike jumping trick where you flatten the bike out horizontally, like a table top, while you're flying through the air.
  • (Table tops) Table Tops was a free daily newspaper produced for Australian Army personnel, published in the Atherton Tableland Training Area in Queensland, Australia, with regional editions produced abroad for serving personnel.
  • A jump on a track that is completely level or flat all the way across it from the lip to the landing.
    fold up
  • fold: bend or lay so that one part covers the other; "fold up the newspaper"; "turn up your collar"
  • fold: become folded or folded up; "The bed folds in a jiffy"

Top of the "wiggles" on Burr Trail
Top of the "wiggles" on Burr Trail
On top of the switch back section up the Burr Trail Road (heading west), is a nice pull off, where you can wander with your camera and photograph back down the way you drove up. My wife and I left our home at 4 pm 17 April 2009 and pretty much drove straight through (19 hours) to a 5 tent site, remote camping spot along the east edge of Capitol Reef National Park in Utah. We traveled in our 1994 Toyota four wheel drive pickup with a cab high canopy; a nice mattress bed in the back; and all our travel, hiking, and backpacking gear “roughly organized” and stored in either the back of the pickup or in the extended cab section of the truck. When I tired, either my wife drove, or if we were both tired, we pulled into a place where we could both catch a little sleep. The pace was steady, persistent, but not rushed. The highlight of the drive down was Utah highway 72 up over the aspen laden high hills between I-70 and the tiny town of Loa. It was spectacular scenery; it had just become light and most important, we had never traveled this nice little section of road before. Saturday 18 April 2009 We stopped at the Capitol Reef National Park visitors’ center for some information on Cedar Mesa camp and for me to cheerfully purchase my $10 LIFETIME America the Beautiful pass (one of the benefits of being an “oldmantravels”). The lady ranger, who gleefully sold me the pass, smiled when she said, that the pass would expire, when I do. We stopped often to take photos as we worked our way down the Burr Trail Road south of Notom, Utah to our campsite. We were pleased with what we found. Juniper trees for shade; knock out view of the snow covered Henry Mountains; trailhead to Red Canyon right next to us; and a picnic table; fire pit; and nearby outhouse - - for all the amenities of camping you could want. Most of all it was quiet and uncrowded. We arrived at camp near mid-day so we ate and organized our camp. I put up our Siltarp so I could sit in my folding camp chair in the shade. My wife loves to sit in the sun and I have always preferred the shade. Soon, we had the camp ready to our liking so we shouldered our day packs, and headed out for a five mile (with side scrambles) hike, up into scenic “Red Canyon”. A swarm of gnats attacked us at camp, when we returned to camp so we took a short hike across the road until the combination of increased wind and decreased temperatures, removed our tormentors. We slept well in our truck canopy bed that night, though it got so cold that our water bottles in the cab of the truck, froze. Sunday 19 April 2009 After a great night’s sleep, we fixed breakfast and repacked the truck to a bright sunny, if cool, desert morning. After leaving Cedar Mesa Camp, we turned south and drove along the capitol reef to the intersection of the Burr Trail leading up over the reef and through nice canyon country to Boulder, Utah. We stopped frequently along this scenic road to take short scrambling hikes to viewpoints, wildflowers, or just for the fun of it through the slickrock country (always with camera at ready). At the top of the switchback road up to the top of the reef we turned north on a four wheel drive road to visit “Peek-a-boo” rock and walk some of the washes in the area. An ice chest full of cold diet Pepsi, was always handy back at our pickup truck, and appreciated. We stopped along a short, sweet, steep, narrow canyon along the paved portion of the Burr Trail and I took a fast hike to the headwall, to get a few photos. It was here, that I had my first, of many, “raven” encounters we would have during this trip. The raven became the “colophon, hallmark, and icon” for this road trip. Before leaving home a good flickr friend of mine (petalouda62) from Belgium, had recommended a book for me. I bought it and saved it to read on this trip, which I did, every chance I got, when we weren’t hiking. The book: Mind of the Raven by Bernd Heinrich. I thought I knew quite a bit about these highly intelligent, often mischievous, and often aloof birds - - but I would find in the book both entertainment and interesting information on these “wolf-birds”. So deep in this short dead end sandstone canyon, I heard the constant calling, echoing back and forth down the canyon. As soon as I left the canyon and turned to take a few more photos of it - - silently down and out of the canyon, glided the resident raven. It was one of many magic moments on this trip, involving Corvus corax. Thank you Roberta. We reached highway 12 at Boulder, Utah and drove on to Escalante, where we had a motel room reserved for Sunday and Monday nights (Circle “D”). Robert is the live in manager of the friendly little Escalante, Utah motel, and it is where we always try to stay when in the area. Dinner at Escalante Outfitters, and a visit to the Escalante visitors’ center, completed our fun second full day of this road trip.
garage slightly organized
garage slightly organized
i.e. you can actually walk into it now and see bare floor. And I have a big work table to the left here (already covered with crap) and enough shelving for the boxes and boxes of stuff for the Airstream. And still half the garage is full of fittings from the Airstream either to be re-used or at least just used for patterns. If nothing else, I would like to salvage some of the solid hardwood (red oak) pieces that aren't rotted. So this means I can get the inside of the trailer itself cleared of storing anything which will make it much easier to work in there. Also with new added strip light in the center of the roof here. In fact there is another to the right but the 2nd bulb I bought was bad so there is a blacklight bulb in there. Don't ask.. And I want to put in 2 or 3 more for GLARING ILLUMINATION EVERYWHERE but even just one extra light is extremely useful. The previous lighting consisted of one screw-bulb fixture way off to the right. Insufficient! Putting in the new lights was extremely quick and easy, the hardest part was in cramming the wirenuts etc back into the switch box. The wood frame of this garage is maybe redwood, or at least some very very nice solid wood - I think it probably dates back to the 30s, maybe earlier. These days nobody in their right mind would use wood that nice for a garage frame. Off to the right is also a very solid original workbench (1.5" thick) which I need to attach the miter saw and a vice and some other stuff to. I probably need to put in some more outlets - there's a 20A circuit, but only two outlets in the whole garage. I should also replace the circuit breaker with a GFCI breaker just in case. In the middle here in front is the side part of the folding table, and behind that is part of the frame for the front fold-out bed, which I was adding some glue to because it was pretty rickety. Much of the original Airstream woodwork is just nailed together, without even wood glue, which might have served to hold it together in 1964 but has become pretty loose by now (where it wasn't completely rotten). So I'm regluing a lot of it with miracle polyurethane glue, in some cases squeezing some glue into cracks that have developed and then banging the nails back in again, in other cases that just means running a bead of glue down the side of an existing joint - it bubbles up a bit and even though it isn't really holding the two pieces together very strongly, it still helps to reduce the amount they can wobble, which repeated across 20 wobbly joints helps to make the thing a lot less fragile. Anyway, that was the process I was engaged in with the couch/bed frame there. We decided to put it back in instead of building a little dinette at the front (briefly considered) since we already have it and the fold-up dining table works pretty well and wouldn't be compatible with the dinette setup. Really, a lot of stuff is staying pretty original although you wouldn't know it from the kitchen cabinets - the bathtub and bathroom sink (albeit repainted), the front bed, many of the overhead cabinets (with new plywood panels), and the kitchen table. And the layout is very similar to the original even with the new kitchen cabinets.

fold up table top
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