ROUND WOOD PICNIC TABLE - PICNIC TABLE

ROUND WOOD PICNIC TABLE - RECTANGULAR WEDDING TABLES.

Round Wood Picnic Table


round wood picnic table
    picnic table
  • A picnic table (or sometimes a picnic bench) is a modified table with attached benches, designed for eating a meal outdoors (picnicking).
  • an inverted V shape with a flat line across the top (not a gallows character). In EVA this is character .
    round
  • Pass and go around (something) so as to move on in a changed direction
  • a charge of ammunition for a single shot
  • Alter (a number) to one less exact but more convenient for calculations
  • from beginning to end; throughout; "It rains all year round on Skye"; "frigid weather the year around"
  • wind around; move along a circular course; "round the bend"
  • Give a round shape to
    wood
  • forest: the trees and other plants in a large densely wooded area
  • United States film actress (1938-1981)
  • the hard fibrous lignified substance under the bark of trees
  • The hard fibrous material that forms the main substance of the trunk or branches of a tree or shrub
  • Such material when cut and used as timber or fuel
  • A golf club with a wooden or other head that is relatively broad from face to back (often with a numeral indicating the degree to which the face is angled to loft the ball)

IMG 1702
IMG 1702
Rock City State Forest - Rock City State Forest comprises 6,015 acres of forest land north of the City of Salamanca in Cattaraugus County, NY. To the north the site borders the Holimont and Holiday Valley Ski Areas, south of Ellicottville. Natural History Interest Stands of pine and spruce, which need direct sunlight to thrive, were planted in farm fields here during the 1930’s. They have since been managed by a series of thinnings to encourage the growth of native hardwood seedlings and a final harvest to allow the hardwoods to grow to maturity. Stands of hardwood forest at Rock City include Black Cherry, Yellow Birch, Sugar Maple, White Ash, Northern Red Oak, and White Oak. Most of the very large oak, ash and cherry trees are less than 100 years old. These fast-growing trees are harvested for high-quality wood for furniture. As you enter Rock City State Forest, either from Little Valley to the west or Great Valley to the east, you go from a glacial sediment-filled valley up onto a ridge that was above the reach of the glacier. Soils here are termed “residual,” meaning that they are composed of “parent” material derived from the underlying bedrock, rather than from glacially deposited material. Therefore these ridge-top soils are millions of years old, as opposed to the newer 15,000 year-old soils in the surrounding valleys. Much of the forest lies at elevations exceeding 2,000 feet, providing a cool, moist habitat for Striped Maple or Moosewood, an unusual forest tree in our region. The wooded highlands here are inhabited by a variety of vireos and warblers including Blue-headed and Red-eyed Vireo, Black-throated Blue Warbler, Black-throated Green Warbler, Ovenbird, American Redstart, Hooded Warbler, and Blackburnian Warbler. Ruffed Grouse, Hermit Thrush, Veery, Rose-breasted Grosbeak, Brown Creeper, and Winter Wren are among other birds that breed here. Raptors include Red-tailed Hawk, Red-shouldered Hawk, Northern Goshawk, and Sharp-shinned Hawk. Common Raven have been seen as well. The highlight of a trip to Rock City State Forest is Little Rock City, a natural outcrop of conglomerate rock in the unglaciated plateau. House-sized blocks of conglomerate jut out from the edge of the plateau and lie scattered down-slope amid the trees. It is a treat to explore the area during the summer as the alleys and passageways between rocks are cool and shady. Rocks are covered with a host of lower plants including mosses, lichens, and ferns, including Common Polypody in abundance. On the forest floor around the rocks are colonies of Stiff Clubmoss. The early spring visitor may find blossoming Trailing Arbutus. Clintonia is very common and forms a dense groundcover in many places. Common Wood-sorrel, with its pink and white candy-striped blossoms, is also abundant. Blossoming Round-leaved Orchis welcomes the observant visitor in July, around the same time that ghostly white Indian Pipes are poking through the duff. Hobblebush, so called because of how it would trip up a horse walking through it, grows in low thickets among rocks scattered over the forest floor. Other Notes The area was the site of many projects carried out by the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC). CCC Camp Seneca operated in the area from 1935 to 1941. Corpsmen constructed roads, trails, and fire lanes, and planted hundreds of thousands of trees, including experimental plantations of walnut, Black Cherry, Tuliptree, oak, pine, and Norway Spruce. The stone-lined walkways to the barracks are still visible and a few have been restored. Norway Spruce seedlings planted along the walkways are over 60 years old now. Today Camp Seneca is an attractive recreational site with picnic tables and a hiking trail through hardwood forests and spruce and pine plantations. A pavilion with four tables, additional tables, and other improvements have been made. A loop hiking trail that starts and ends at Camp Seneca, and a trail also connects Camp Seneca and Little Rock City. At Little Rock City there is a nature trail that loops through some of the more impressive rocks. There is a turn around and parking area, along with four single table picnic/camping sites with concrete slabs, and pavilion-type covers. There is currently a satellite-type outhouse. Several hiking and bike trails access the forest, which in turn intersect public and forest roads. In addition to the DEC-maintained trails, a portion of the Finger Lakes Trail/North Country Scenic Trail passes through the site. How To Get There Rock City State Forest is located north of Salamanca, NY; southwest of Ellicottville, NY; and southeast of Little Valley, NY. From exit 20 (Salamanca) off I-86, go east on NY 417 (Main St.) in Salamanca to NY 353. Turn left onto NY 353 and proceed approximately 4.1 miles to Whig St. Turn right onto Whig St and proceed approximately 2.3 miles to Hungry Hollow Rd. Turn right onto Hungry Hollow Rd and continue approximately 1.5 miles to Rock City Rd. Turn right onto
IMG 1607
IMG 1607
Rock City State Forest - Rock City State Forest comprises 6,015 acres of forest land north of the City of Salamanca in Cattaraugus County, NY. To the north the site borders the Holimont and Holiday Valley Ski Areas, south of Ellicottville. Natural History Interest Stands of pine and spruce, which need direct sunlight to thrive, were planted in farm fields here during the 1930’s. They have since been managed by a series of thinnings to encourage the growth of native hardwood seedlings and a final harvest to allow the hardwoods to grow to maturity. Stands of hardwood forest at Rock City include Black Cherry, Yellow Birch, Sugar Maple, White Ash, Northern Red Oak, and White Oak. Most of the very large oak, ash and cherry trees are less than 100 years old. These fast-growing trees are harvested for high-quality wood for furniture. As you enter Rock City State Forest, either from Little Valley to the west or Great Valley to the east, you go from a glacial sediment-filled valley up onto a ridge that was above the reach of the glacier. Soils here are termed “residual,” meaning that they are composed of “parent” material derived from the underlying bedrock, rather than from glacially deposited material. Therefore these ridge-top soils are millions of years old, as opposed to the newer 15,000 year-old soils in the surrounding valleys. Much of the forest lies at elevations exceeding 2,000 feet, providing a cool, moist habitat for Striped Maple or Moosewood, an unusual forest tree in our region. The wooded highlands here are inhabited by a variety of vireos and warblers including Blue-headed and Red-eyed Vireo, Black-throated Blue Warbler, Black-throated Green Warbler, Ovenbird, American Redstart, Hooded Warbler, and Blackburnian Warbler. Ruffed Grouse, Hermit Thrush, Veery, Rose-breasted Grosbeak, Brown Creeper, and Winter Wren are among other birds that breed here. Raptors include Red-tailed Hawk, Red-shouldered Hawk, Northern Goshawk, and Sharp-shinned Hawk. Common Raven have been seen as well. The highlight of a trip to Rock City State Forest is Little Rock City, a natural outcrop of conglomerate rock in the unglaciated plateau. House-sized blocks of conglomerate jut out from the edge of the plateau and lie scattered down-slope amid the trees. It is a treat to explore the area during the summer as the alleys and passageways between rocks are cool and shady. Rocks are covered with a host of lower plants including mosses, lichens, and ferns, including Common Polypody in abundance. On the forest floor around the rocks are colonies of Stiff Clubmoss. The early spring visitor may find blossoming Trailing Arbutus. Clintonia is very common and forms a dense groundcover in many places. Common Wood-sorrel, with its pink and white candy-striped blossoms, is also abundant. Blossoming Round-leaved Orchis welcomes the observant visitor in July, around the same time that ghostly white Indian Pipes are poking through the duff. Hobblebush, so called because of how it would trip up a horse walking through it, grows in low thickets among rocks scattered over the forest floor. Other Notes The area was the site of many projects carried out by the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC). CCC Camp Seneca operated in the area from 1935 to 1941. Corpsmen constructed roads, trails, and fire lanes, and planted hundreds of thousands of trees, including experimental plantations of walnut, Black Cherry, Tuliptree, oak, pine, and Norway Spruce. The stone-lined walkways to the barracks are still visible and a few have been restored. Norway Spruce seedlings planted along the walkways are over 60 years old now. Today Camp Seneca is an attractive recreational site with picnic tables and a hiking trail through hardwood forests and spruce and pine plantations. A pavilion with four tables, additional tables, and other improvements have been made. A loop hiking trail that starts and ends at Camp Seneca, and a trail also connects Camp Seneca and Little Rock City. At Little Rock City there is a nature trail that loops through some of the more impressive rocks. There is a turn around and parking area, along with four single table picnic/camping sites with concrete slabs, and pavilion-type covers. There is currently a satellite-type outhouse. Several hiking and bike trails access the forest, which in turn intersect public and forest roads. In addition to the DEC-maintained trails, a portion of the Finger Lakes Trail/North Country Scenic Trail passes through the site. How To Get There Rock City State Forest is located north of Salamanca, NY; southwest of Ellicottville, NY; and southeast of Little Valley, NY. From exit 20 (Salamanca) off I-86, go east on NY 417 (Main St.) in Salamanca to NY 353. Turn left onto NY 353 and proceed approximately 4.1 miles to Whig St. Turn right onto Whig St and proceed approximately 2.3 miles to Hungry Hollow Rd. Turn right onto Hungry Hollow Rd and continue approximately 1.5 miles to Rock City Rd. Turn right onto

round wood picnic table
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