MEASURING WHEEL OFFSET. MEASURING WHEEL

Measuring wheel offset. Alloy wheel refurbishment herts

Measuring Wheel Offset


measuring wheel offset
    measuring wheel
  • A piece of field equipment designed to measure distances; generally composed of a small wheel and calibrated meter mounted on the end of a handle
    offset
  • beginning: the time at which something is supposed to begin; "they got an early start"; "she knew from the get-go that he was the man for her"
  • compensate for or counterbalance; "offset deposits and withdrawals"
  • A consideration or amount that diminishes or balances the effect of a contrary one
  • The amount or distance by which something is out of line
  • A short distance measured perpendicularly from the main line of measurement
  • counterbalance: a compensating equivalent
measuring wheel offset - CST -
CST - MeasureMark 31-108 Single 4-Inch ABS Plastic Wheel Measuring Wheel in Feet/Inches
CST - MeasureMark 31-108 Single 4-Inch ABS Plastic Wheel Measuring Wheel in Feet/Inches
Measuring Wheels, 4" ABS Plastic, 10,000 ft-in. Accurate for all applications--precision manufacturing assures high reliability. Built strong to last; yet lightweight. Safety yellow color; Sealed housing prevents contamination. Offset reset switch. No more accidental resetting of counter. Full-view display for operator ease and accurate reading of distance. Our new line of quality measuring wheels meets a host of your measuring needs, outdoors and indoors. Unique collapsible handle allows for easy storage and transport.

86% (5)
Corrugated fiberboard
Corrugated fiberboard
Corrugated fiberboard Corrugated fiberboard is a paper-based material consisting of a fluted corrugated sheet and one or two flat linerboards. It is widely used in the manufacture of corrugated boxes and shipping containers. The corrugated medium and linerboard are made of containerboard, a paper-like material usually over 0.01 inches (0.25 mm) thick. Paperboard and corrugated fiberboard are sometimes called cardboard, although cardboard might be any heavy paper-pulp based board. History In the mid-19th century, an ingenious concept enabled flimsy sheets of paper to be transformed into a rigid, stackable and cushioning form of packaging for delicate goods in transit Corrugated (also called pleated) paper was patented in England in 1856, and used as a liner for tall hats, but corrugated boxboard was not patented and used as a shipping material until December 20, 1871. The patent was issued to Albert Jones of New York City for single-sided (single-face) corrugated board. Jones used the corrugated board for wrapping bottles and glass lantern chimneys. The first machine for producing large quantities of corrugated board was built in 1874 by G. Smyth, and in the same year Oliver Long improved upon Jones' design by inventing corrugated board with liner sheets on both sides. This was corrugated board as we know it today. The Scottish-born Robert Gair invented the pre-cut paperboard box in 1890 – flat pieces manufactured in bulk that folded into boxes. Gair's invention came about as a result of an accident: he was a Brooklyn printer and paper-bag maker during the 1870s, and one day, while he was printing an order of seed bags, a metal ruler normally used to crease bags shifted in position and cut them. Gair discovered that by cutting and creasing in one operation he could make prefabricated paperboard boxes. Applying this idea to corrugated boxboard was a straightforward development when the material became available in the early twentieth century. The corrugated box was initially used for packaging glass and pottery containers. Later, the case enabled fruit and produce to be brought from the farm to the retailer without bruising, improving the return to the producers and opening up export markets. Manufacture of corrugated board Corrugated board is manufactured on large high-precision machinery lines called corrugators, usually running at about 500 feet per minute (2.5 m/s) or more. These machines over time have become very complex with the objective of avoiding some common problems in corrugated board production, such as warp and washboarding. The manufacturing process begins with pulping, the separation of wood (hardwood and sapwood) into individual fibers, as accomplished by mechanical methods or chemical treatment. In the classical corrugator, the paper is softened with high-pressure steam. After the board is formed it is dried in the so-called dry-end. Here the newly formed corrugated board is heated from the bottom by hot plates. On the top, various pressures are applied by a load system on the belt. The corrugated medium is often 0.026 pounds per square foot (0.13 kg/m?) basis weight in the U.S.; in the UK, a 90 grams per square metre (0.018 lb/sq ft) fluting paper is common. At the single-facer, it is heated, moistened, and formed into a fluted pattern on geared wheels. This is joined to a flat linerboard with a starch based adhesive to form single face board. At the double-backer, a second flat linerboard is adhered to the other side of the fluted medium to form single wall corrugated board. Linerboards are test liners (recycled paper) or kraft paperboard (of various grades). The liner may be bleached white, mottled white, colored, or preprinted. Common flute sizes are "A", "B", "C", "E" and "F" or microflute. The letter designation relates to the order that the flutes were invented, not the relative sizes. Flute size refers to the number of flutes per lineal foot, although the actual flute dimensions for different corrugator manufacuturers may vary slightly. Measuring the number of flutes per lineal foot is a more reliable method of identifying flute size than measuring board thickness, which can vary due to manufacturing conditions. The most common flute size in corrugated boxes is "C" flute. Corrugated fiberboard can be specified by the construction (single face, singlewall, doublewall, etc), flute size, burst strength, edge crush strength, flat crush, basis weights of components (pounds per thousand square feet, grams per square meter, etc), surface treatments and coatings, etc. TAPPI and ASTM test methods for these are standardized. The choice of corrugated medium, flute size, combining adhesive, and linerboards can be varied to engineer a corrugated board with specific properties to match a wide variety of potential uses. Double and triple-wall corrugated board is also produced for high stacking strength and puncture resista
Holy Mount Athos
Holy Mount Athos
Mount Athos (Greek: ???? ????, Oros Athos) is a mountain on the peninsula of the same name in Macedonia, of northern Greece, called in Greek Agion Oros (????? ????, transliterated often as Hagion Oros), or in English, "Holy Mountain". In Classical times, the peninsula was called Akti (????) (sometimes Acte or Akte). Politically it is known in Greece as the Autonomous Monastic State of the Holy Mountain. This World Heritage Site is home to 20 Eastern Orthodox monasteries and forms a self-governed monastic state within the sovereignty of the Hellenic Republic. Spiritually, Mount Athos comes under the direct jurisdiction of the Ecumenical Patriarchate of Constantinople. The peninsula, the easternmost "leg" of the larger Chalcidice peninsula, protrudes into the Aegean Sea for some 60 kilometres (37 mi) at a width between 7 to 12 km and covers an area of 335.637 square kilometres (129.59 sq mi), with the actual Mount Athos and its steep, densely forested slopes reaching up to 2,033 metres (6,670 ft). The seas around the end of the peninsula can be dangerous. Though land-linked, it is accessible only by boat. The number of visitors is restricted and all are required to get a special entrance permit before entering Mount Athos. Only males are allowed entrance into Mount Athos, which is called "Garden of the Virgin" by monks,[1] and Orthodox Christians take precedence in the permit issuance procedure. Only males over the age of 18 who are members of the Eastern Orthodox Church are allowed to live on Athos. There are religious guards, who are not monks, that assist the monks, and any other people not monks are required to live in the peninsula's capital, Karyes. The 2001 Greek national census counted a population of 2,262 inhabitants. [edit] History [edit] Antiquity The peninsula as seen from the summit of Mount Athos (40°9?28?N 24°19?36?E? / ?40.15778°N 24.32667°E? / 40.15778; 24.32667), looking north-westIn the context of Greek mythology Athos was the name of one of the Gigantes that challenged the Greek gods during the Gigantomachia. Athos threw a massive rock against Poseidon which fell in the Aegean sea and became the Athonite Peninsula. According to another version of the story, Poseidon used the mountain to bury the defeated giant. Herodotus tells us that Pelasgians from the island of Lemnos populated the peninsula, then called Acte or Akte. (Herodotus, VII:22) Strabo reports of five cities on the peninsula: Dion (Dium), Cleonae (Kleonai), Thyssos (Thyssus), Olophyxos (Olophyxis), Acrothoi (Akrothoon), of which the last is near the crest. (Strabo, Geography, VII:33:1) Eretria also established colonies on Acte. Two other cities were established in the Classical period: Acanthus (Akanthos) and Sane. Some of these cities minted their own coins. The peninsula was on the invasion route of Xerxes I, who spent three years [2] excavating a channel across the isthmus to allow the passage of his invasion fleet in 483 BC. After the death of Alexander the Great, the architect Dinocrates (Deinokrates), proposed to carve the entire mountain into a statue of Alexander. The history of the peninsula during latter ages is shrouded by the lack of historical accounts. Archaeologists have not been able to determine the exact location of the cities reported by Strabo. It is believed that they must have been deserted when Athos' new inhabitants, the monks, started arriving at some time before the 7th century AD.[3] [edit] Early Christianity According to the athonite tradition, the Blessed Virgin Mary was sailing accompanied by St John the Evangelist from Joppa to Cyprus to visit Lazarus. When the ship was blown off course to then pagan Athos it was forced to anchor near the port of Klement, close to the present monastery of Iviron. The Virgin walked ashore and, overwhelmed by the wonderful and wild natural beauty of the mountain, she blessed it and asked her Son for it to be her garden. A voice was heard saying "???? ? ????? ????? ?????? ??? ??? ??????????? ??? ??? ??????????, ??? ?? ??? ????? ???????? ??? ???????? ???????" (Translation: "Let this place be your inheritance and your garden, a paradise and a haven of salvation for those seeking to be saved"). From that moment the mountain was consecrated as the garden of the Mother of God and was out of bounds to all other women. Historical documents on ancient Mount Athos history are very few. It is certain that monks have been there since the 4th century, and possibly since the 3rd. During Constantine I's reign (324-337) both Christians and pagans were living there. During the reign of Julian the Apostate (361-363), the churches of Mount Athos were destroyed, and Christians hid in the woods and inaccessible places. Later, during Theodosius I's reign (383-395), the pagan temples were destroyed. The lexicographer Hesychius of Alexandria states that in the 5th century there was still a temple and a statue of "Zeus Ath

measuring wheel offset
measuring wheel offset
Keson RR318N 3-foot RoadRunner Measuring Wheel
Best-selling Keson Road Runner measuring wheel measures 9999 feet, 11 inches - that's almost two miles - without resetting, making this measuring wheel ideal for long-distance outdoor use. Features a 5-digit, easy-to-read magnified counter and heavy-duty ABS wheel with clean 3-spoke design. Telescoping handle adjusts to user's optimum comfort level. U.S.A. Measures up to (ft.): 9,999, Wheel Circumference (ft.): 3, Wheel Diameter (in.): 11 1/2, Overall Height (in.): 40, Foldable or Retractable Handle: Retractable, Foldable or Retractable Height (in.): 23, Color: Yellow, Material: ABS wheel with extruded aluminum handle, Stand Included: Yes, Case Included: No

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