HISTORY OF SPINNING WHEELS : SPINNING WHEELS

History Of Spinning Wheels : Visual Color Wheel

History Of Spinning Wheels


history of spinning wheels
    spinning wheels
  • An apparatus for spinning yarn or thread, with a spindle driven by a wheel attached to a crank or treadle
  • (spinning wheel) a small domestic spinning machine with a single spindle that is driven by hand or foot
  • (Spinning wheel (animation)) A throbber is a graphic found in a graphical user interface of a computer program (especially a web browser) that animates to show the user that the program is performing an action (such as downloading a web page).
  • (Spinning Wheel (song)) "Spinning Wheel" is the title of a popular song from 1969 (see 1969 in music) by the band Blood, Sweat & Tears. The song was written by band member and vocalist David Clayton-Thomas and appears on their self-titled album.
    history of
  • ecology | evolutionary biology | geography | model organisms | molecular biology | paleontology
  • heres a brief explanation of the word *** and how it can be used in everyday life. enjoy!
history of spinning wheels - Catalogue of
Catalogue of the Horner collection of spinning wheels and accessories
Catalogue of the Horner collection of spinning wheels and accessories
This is a reproduction of a book published before 1923. This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process. We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections, have elected to bring it back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide. We appreciate your understanding of the imperfections in the preservation process, and hope you enjoy this valuable book.

79% (10)
23/365: “I claim that in losing the spinning wheel we lost our left lung. We are, therefore, suffering from galloping consumption. The restoration of the wheel arrests the progress of the fell disease
23/365: “I claim that in losing the spinning wheel we lost our left lung. We are, therefore, suffering from galloping consumption. The restoration of the wheel arrests the progress of the fell disease
I have to admit that this was a last minute decision. I wasn't ready for any photo ops today and did not get any decent shots. But I love my 50 mm lens and so I went with that and what I have plenty of, yarn and more specifically my handspun. Spinning is a recent obsession. For those not in the know, I make yarn with wool using a spinning wheel ( I have a photo somewhere of my wheel). One can also use a spindle to make yarn but I am not very good with a spindle . Hand spinning is an ancient textile art that goes back thousands of years. There is actual archaeological evidence that puts spinning in the Upper Paleolithic era which is about 20,000 years ago!!! (Hey, one learns something new everyday!) I guess somehow we needed to figure out how to use animal hairs to make clothes, right? Spinning basically consists of twisting the animal or plant fiber until the desired length is reached and then another tuft is added. It is pretty time consuming doing it with a handspindle and even a wheel but this method is still used in many countries such as Peru, Tibet and India. There is a small but passionate group in the US of which I could attest to myself. Why make something that you can buy at the store? Valid question I think I definitely enjoy the creative process of spinning but I love the zen-like aspect of this art. It's actually quite relaxing and even meditative. Also in the world today where everyone is so far removed from what they eat/wear/use in general, learning to actually make something and knowing some of the history puts the rest of the world in perspective. It is empowering. Ghandi, himself learned to spin when he was middle-aged and spun everyday after that for the rest of his life. He believed that "handspinning, combined with weaving on hand looms, was the only logical way for people of India to become self-sufficient and independent...as well as have an economic contribution." According to Gandhi, the Indian people’s proper attitude toward hand spinning was inexorably linked to one’s ability to put aside one’s own personal needs and desires and replace them with a love for others, particularly the poor.
spinning wheel and loom- Tubac Presidio Historic State Park, Tubac, Arizona USA
spinning wheel and loom- Tubac Presidio Historic State Park, Tubac, Arizona USA
1953 Brownie Hawkeye camera, Ilford HP5 film (400 ISO) about a 3-4 second exp- depressing the shutter button in bulb mode. Processed in homemade Caffenol C coffee-based developer. Negative was scanned twice- once with a translucent rough pulp paper, (for texture) and once by itself, then layered together in Photoshop 6. The Tubac Presidio is Arizona's first state park, and is also on the 2010 state park closure list. I think I've begun a project of making images of as many of the 13 closing state parks as I can, with the vintage Brownie. We plan to visit many in the next few months! Time to buy more film!!!

history of spinning wheels
history of spinning wheels
Nini Towok's Spinning Wheel: Cloth and the Cycle of Life in Kerek, Java (Textile Series, No. 9)
In 1976 Dutch textile specialist Rens Heringa first visited Kerek in rural East Java and discovered a region where--unlike the rest of Java--the full range of textiles with woven patterning, as well as the only batik still made on handwoven cotton cloth, continued to be produced for local use.
Each type of cloth made in Kerek is created for a specific purpose--to be worn by a person of a particular age, social, or residential group; to serve in life-cycle events such as marriage or funerals; to act as a focal point in agricultural ceremonies or curing rites. The functions, techniques, patterning, and especially the color combinations of the cloth all form part of a highly structured and elaborate system of belief that is remarkably integrated with the community's social organization, mythology, and ritual practices. Remnants of similarly integrated systems of belief are known from many parts of Java, but by the late 20th century the full system could be observed only in Kerek. Batik from Kerek today represents the antecedents of the courtly and urban batik found in collections around the world.

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