TUSCAN TILE FLOORING - TILE FLOORING

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Tuscan Tile Flooring


tuscan tile flooring
    flooring
  • The boards or other material of which a floor is made
  • floor: the inside lower horizontal surface (as of a room, hallway, tent, or other structure); "they needed rugs to cover the bare floors"; "we spread our sleeping bags on the dry floor of the tent"
  • building material used in laying floors
  • (floored) provided with a floor
    tuscan
  • a dialect of Italian spoken in Tuscany (especially Florence)
  • Relating to or denoting a classical order of architecture resembling the Doric but lacking all ornamentation
  • Of or relating to Tuscany, its inhabitants, or the form of Italian spoken there, which is the standard variety taught to foreign learners
  • of or relating to or characteristic of Tuscany or its people
  • a resident of Tuscany
    tile
  • a flat thin rectangular slab (as of fired clay or rubber or linoleum) used to cover surfaces
  • cover with tiles; "tile the wall and the floor of the bathroom"
  • Cover (something) with tiles
  • Arrange (two or more windows) on a computer screen so that they do not overlap
  • a thin flat slab of fired clay used for roofing
tuscan tile flooring - Porcelain Interlocking
Porcelain Interlocking Deck Tiles - Tuscan Red
Porcelain Interlocking Deck Tiles - Tuscan Red
Porcelain Interlocking Deck Tiles - Tuscan Red Design: Slip resistant porcelain tiles with integral interlocking plastic mesh base for quick and easy installation without adhesives or grout over a solid, smooth surface. Suitable for most fully exposed, exterior, non commercial applications. Material: High strength porcelain tiles coated with a layer of fine silica sand for slip resitance. Water absorption < 5%. Porcelain thickness 5/16". Individual Tile dimension: 12" L x 12" W x 1" H (inches) x 3.9 lbs. Carton dimension: 13.5" L x 13.5" W x 8" H (inches) x 39 lbs. Warranty: 5 years.

76% (15)
IMG 4275 R SX1
IMG 4275 R SX1
The Vermont State House Montpelier Vermont USA Camera: Canon PowerShot SX1 IS Cropped and compressed JPEG Data: A.D.O.F. available on request ....... Gre ............................................................................................................................................................. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Exterior facade and dome The current structure was designed by architect Thomas Silloway (1828–1910) amplifying the design of an earlier structure (the second Vermont State House), designed by Ammi B. Young, (1798–1874) who was later the supervising architect of the U.S. Treasury. The earlier second State House was constructed on the same site between 1833–1838. Young's earlier structure was of a more chaste Greek Revival design and based upon the Temple of Theseus in Athens. Gray Barre granite is used for the two-story cruciform design with a Doric portico and a low saucer dome echoing William Thornton's earliest design for the United States Capitol. Young's structure was nearly totally destroyed by a fire during January 1857. Silloway was able to salvage the Doric portico, as well as portions of the granite walls. Silloway added an additional bay of windows on each side of the central portico and increased the height of the dome (copper on a wood substructure) to its current level. This may have been done to imitate the increased height of the new Capitol dome in Washington designed by Thomas U. Walter which was being constructed during the same time. The dome and roofs were originally painted a dark terracotta red to suggest Tuscan tile. The dome was not gilded until the early 20th century, when many states did so as a part of the Colonial Revival style. The dome is topped by a statue named Agriculture, a representation of Ceres, an ancient Roman goddess of agriculture. The original statue was carved by Vermont artist Larkin Goldsmith Mead, who also carved the large bust of Lincoln in the Hall of Inscriptions on the State House's ground floor. The current statue is a replacement, and something of a piece of folk art, based on Mead's original. It was carved during 1938 by then 87-year-old Dwight Dwinell, Sergeant-at-Arms (in Vermont this official position is similar in nature to the White House Chief Usher). The Doric portico, the main ceremonial entrance, houses a granite statue of Ethan Allen. Ethan Allen was a founder of Vermont and commander of the Green Mountain Boys, an early Vermont military infantry active during the Vermont Republic, (1777–1791). The statue was carved by Aristide Piccini during 1941, to replace the original marble version carved by Larkin Goldsmith Mead during 1858. The architect Stanford White (1853–1906) considered Silloway's Vermont State House to be the finest example of the Greek Revival style in the United States. ............................................................................................................................................................
IMG 6904 RN G10
IMG 6904 RN G10
The Vermont State House Montpelier Vermont USA Camera: Canon PowerShot G10 Cropped and compressed JPEG Data: A.D.O.F. available on request ....... Gre ............................................................................................................................................................. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Exterior facade and dome The current structure was designed by architect Thomas Silloway (1828–1910) amplifying the design of an earlier structure (the second Vermont State House), designed by Ammi B. Young, (1798–1874) who was later the supervising architect of the U.S. Treasury. The earlier second State House was constructed on the same site between 1833–1838. Young's earlier structure was of a more chaste Greek Revival design and based upon the Temple of Theseus in Athens. Gray Barre granite is used for the two-story cruciform design with a Doric portico and a low saucer dome echoing William Thornton's earliest design for the United States Capitol. Young's structure was nearly totally destroyed by a fire during January 1857. Silloway was able to salvage the Doric portico, as well as portions of the granite walls. Silloway added an additional bay of windows on each side of the central portico and increased the height of the dome (copper on a wood substructure) to its current level. This may have been done to imitate the increased height of the new Capitol dome in Washington designed by Thomas U. Walter which was being constructed during the same time. The dome and roofs were originally painted a dark terracotta red to suggest Tuscan tile. The dome was not gilded until the early 20th century, when many states did so as a part of the Colonial Revival style. The dome is topped by a statue named Agriculture, a representation of Ceres, an ancient Roman goddess of agriculture. The original statue was carved by Vermont artist Larkin Goldsmith Mead, who also carved the large bust of Lincoln in the Hall of Inscriptions on the State House's ground floor. The current statue is a replacement, and something of a piece of folk art, based on Mead's original. It was carved during 1938 by then 87-year-old Dwight Dwinell, Sergeant-at-Arms (in Vermont this official position is similar in nature to the White House Chief Usher). The Doric portico, the main ceremonial entrance, houses a granite statue of Ethan Allen. Ethan Allen was a founder of Vermont and commander of the Green Mountain Boys, an early Vermont military infantry active during the Vermont Republic, (1777–1791). The statue was carved by Aristide Piccini during 1941, to replace the original marble version carved by Larkin Goldsmith Mead during 1858. The architect Stanford White (1853–1906) considered Silloway's Vermont State House to be the finest example of the Greek Revival style in the United States. ............................................................................................................................................................

tuscan tile flooring
tuscan tile flooring
Tuscan Serenity by Robin Wethe Altman - Tuscan Landscape Glass Tile Wall Floor Mural 18" x 18" Kitchen Shower Backsplash
This beautiful tuscan landscape glass tile mural will create a stunning focal point in any room of your home! Each of our murals are individually handcrafted and made to order. In the event of breakage during shipment, replacement tiles will be promptly shipped at no cost. Artwork is totally protected from wear and abrasion once installed. An epoxy thin set mortar in white is recommended for installation. A grout formulated for glass tiles is required. Tiles can be cleaned with any household cleaning product. Our murals may also be mounted on a backer board (like Gatorboard) using a high quality silicon caulk, framed, and hung on the wall as other artwork.

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