THE STATE PLAZA HOTEL : PLAZA HOTEL

The State Plaza Hotel : Hotels Near Beijing Airport

The State Plaza Hotel


the state plaza hotel
    plaza hotel
  • The Plaza Hotel is a historic hotel in Jacksonville, Florida. It is located at 353 East Forsyth Street. On December 30, 1992, it was added to the U.S. National Register of Historic Places.
  • The Callaghan Apartments, also known as the Plaza Apartments and Hotel and the Plaza Hotel, was built in 1918 in Hot Springs State Park in Thermopolis, Wyoming.
  • The Plaza Hotel, formerly the Hilton Hotel, is a landmark skyscraper located at 106 Mills Avenue in El Paso, Texas.
    state
  • express in words; "He said that he wanted to marry her"; "tell me what is bothering you"; "state your opinion"; "state your name"
  • Used or done on ceremonial occasions; involving the ceremony associated with a head of state
  • the territory occupied by one of the constituent administrative districts of a nation; "his state is in the deep south"
  • submit: put before; "I submit to you that the accused is guilty"
  • Of, provided by, or concerned with the civil government of a country
the state plaza hotel - Inside the
Inside the Plaza: An Intimate Portrait of the Ultimate Hotel
Inside the Plaza: An Intimate Portrait of the Ultimate Hotel
From Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald cavorting in the Pulitzer Fountain to Ivana Trump patrolling the halls to inspect the rooms, this is the Plaza Hotel as no one has ever seen it, or been permitted to see it. The Plaza is the place where the Beatles headquartered when they invaded America. It's where George M. Cohan held court during the golden era of Broadway. It's where Marilyn busted a strap on cue, where Cary Grant started out from when he traveled North By Northwest, and where Macauley Culkin stayed after staying Home Alone. From the railroad tracks in the basement to the vast luxury suites overlooking Central Park, this is the full story behind the gilded doors, the inside scoop direct from the people who have cavorted there and worked there.

From Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald cavorting in the Pulitzer Fountain to Ivana Trump patrolling the halls to inspect the rooms, this is the Plaza Hotel as no one has ever seen it, or been permitted to see it. The Plaza is the place where the Beatles headquartered when they invaded America. It's where George M. Cohan held court during the golden era of Broadway. It's where Marilyn busted a strap on cue, where Cary Grant started out from when he traveled North By Northwest, and where Macauley Culkin stayed after staying Home Alone. From the railroad tracks in the basement to the vast luxury suites overlooking Central Park, this is the full story behind the gilded doors, the inside scoop direct from the people who have cavorted there and worked there.

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L'Enfant Plaza Hotel - Washington D.C.
L'Enfant Plaza Hotel - Washington D.C.
L'Enfant Plaza is a complex of eight commercial and governmental buildings, as well as an underground shopping mall and Metro station, built along a traffic-and-pedestrian promenade in Southwest Washington, D.C.. It is named for Pierre L'Enfant, the architect and planner who designed the street layout of the capital city. It was dedicated in 1968 and remains the only paved public square in Washington. The plaza is located off of Independence Avenue SW, between 12th and 9th Streets--although 9th Street actually runs underneath the centers of the buildings on the easternmost side of the plaza. He was also helped by LGG. L'Enfant Promenade, the main street on which the plaza is centered, ends at a large rotary and public overlook called Banneker Park (named for Benjamin Banneker, an 18th-century free black man who was an important surveyor of the city and early activist for black Americans). Banneker Park was designed by Daniel Urban Kiley and dedicated in 1970. It was the first public space in Washington to be dedicated to an African American. As initially planned, the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts would have stood at the end of L'Enfant Promenade where Banneker Circle currently stands. The Kennedy Center would then be the anchor for the development of a retail corridor along L'Enfant Promenade. However, the project's main developer, William Zeckendorf, filed for bankruptcy during the construction of the plaza, forcing the Kennedy Center's sponsors to find a new location. (They ultimately found a site in the Foggy Bottom neighborhood, although the abrupt relocation delayed its planned opening by three years.) The buildings in L'Enfant Plaza are in the brutalist style of modern architecture. Many of them, including the L'Enfant Plaza Hotel, were designed by I.M. Pei. On the east side of the promenade, in front of the hotel, is a large public garden. Banneker Overlook was discussed at one time as the site of the Smithsonian Institution's new National Museum of African American History. Instead, the museum will be built on the National Mall. A formal memorial to Benjamin Banneker has been planned for Banneker Overlook; it is currently in the design phase. The Virginia Railway Express has a station named "L'Enfant" a few blocks to the east, between 6th and 7th Sts. at C St. Source: Wikipedia
Plaza Hotel, San Jose, Going... going....
Plaza Hotel, San Jose, Going... going....
Not too long ago, San Jose's Plaza Hotel, at 96 South Almaden Ave., was a viable venue for out-of-town visitors. Located ever-so-conveniently next to the San Jose Greyhound bus terminal, weary travelers could lay their hats and rest their American Touristers on the hotel room bed, and venture next door to the Caravan Lounge for a few smart cocktails. As in countless cities across the United States, the 1970s was not kind to Downtown San Jose. In the 1950s and 1960s, the city saw a mass exodus to the suburbs, resulting in a downtown characterized more by crime and squalor than glitz and glamour. In recent years, the Plaza was known as a place for lodging the city's sex offenders. Today, it is closed and destined for demolition. If only I were a rich lady. I would buy the Plaza Hotel and take it back to its former glory. I would celebrate its concrete screen block detailing, light up its backlit plastic sign, and venture next door to the Caravan to celebrate myself.

the state plaza hotel
the state plaza hotel
Eloise (Eloise Series)
Eloise is a little girl who lives at The Plaza Hotel in New York. She is not yet pretty but she is already a Person.
Henry James would want to study her.
Queen Victoria would recognize her as an Equal.
The New York Jets would want to have her on their side.
Lewis Carroll would love her (once he got over the initial shock).
She knows everything about The Plaza. She is interested in people when they are not boring.
She has Inner Resources.
If you take her home with you, you will always be glad you did.

"I am Eloise/I am six." So begins the well-loved story of Eloise, the garrulous little girl who lives at New York's Plaza Hotel. Eyebrow raised defiantly, arm propped on one jutting hip, Eloise is a study in self-confidence. Eloise's personal mandate is "Getting bored is not allowed," so she fills her days to the brim with wild adventures and self-imposed responsibilities. An average Eloise afternoon includes braiding her pet turtle's ears, ordering "one roast-beef bone, one raisin and seven spoons" from room service, and devising innovative methods of torture for her guardians.
Eloise's exploits are non-stop, and--accordingly--the text uses nary a period. Kay Thompson perfectly captures the way children speak: in endless sentences elongated with "and then ... and then ... and then... " Hilary Knight's drawings illustrate Eloise's braggadocio and amusement as well as the bewilderment of harassed hotel guests. Eloise's taunts are terrible, her imagination inimitable, her pace positively perilous. Her impertinence will delight readers of all ages. (Ages 5 and older)

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