HOMESTEAD EXTENDED STAY HOTEL - HOMESTEAD EXTENDED

Homestead Extended Stay Hotel - Accommodation In Bratislava

Homestead Extended Stay Hotel


homestead extended stay hotel
    homestead extended
  • (Homestead Extension) Homestead Extension of Florida's Turnpike (HEFT), assigned the State Road 821 (SR 821) designation by the Florida Department of Transportation, and originally known as the West Dade Expressway, is a southern extension of the tolled Florida's Turnpike, running around the
    hotel
  • An establishment providing accommodations, meals, and other services for travelers and tourists
  • A code word representing the letter H, used in radio communication
  • In French contexts an hotel particulier is an urban "private house" of a grand sort. Whereas an ordinary maison was built as part of a row, sharing party walls with the houses on either side and directly fronting on a street, an hotel particulier was often free-standing, and by the eighteenth
  • a building where travelers can pay for lodging and meals and other services
  • A hotel is an establishment that provides paid lodging on a short-term basis. The provision of basic accommodation, in times past, consisting only of a room with a bed, a cupboard, a small table and a washstand has largely been replaced by rooms with modern facilities, including en-suite
    stay
  • Delay leaving so as to join in (an activity)
  • Remain in the same place
  • (of food) Remain in the stomach, rather than be thrown up as vomit
  • continuing or remaining in a place or state; "they had a nice stay in Paris"; "a lengthy hospital stay"; "a four-month stay in bankruptcy court"
  • arrest: the state of inactivity following an interruption; "the negotiations were in arrest"; "held them in check"; "during the halt he got some lunch"; "the momentary stay enabled him to escape the blow"; "he spent the entire stop in his seat"
  • stay the same; remain in a certain state; "The dress remained wet after repeated attempts to dry it"; "rest assured"; "stay alone"; "He remained unmoved by her tears"; "The bad weather continued for another week"

Wyckoff-Bennett Homestead
Wyckoff-Bennett Homestead
Homecrest, Brooklyn, New York City, New York, United States Singularly distinguished by its fine scale and proportion, this one and one-half story frame dwelling is a handsome example of one of the few remaining Eighteenth Century Dutch Colonial farmhouses still standing in Brooklyn, It- is modest in size and in an excellent state of preservation; two hundred years of wear have done little to diminish the simple beauty of its clear cut profile and the dignity of its related parts. It has been declared, by Maud Dilliard the historian, to be the most beautiful example of Dutch Colonial architecture in Brooklyn. The house is rectangular in plan with an extension on the northern end containing a kitchen and a room that in earlier days was used for a milk house. In the late 1890*s, when the land was divided into lots, streets were put through and the house, which faced south, was turned around to face the west. The structure was placed upon a brick foundation, and dormers were added. A long porch extends the width of the south exposure, and six slender columns support the roof which is swept down over the porch area in a gentle curve. The upper half of the horizontally divided front door (dutch door) contains two original thick, bluish green windows called bulls eyes. In the interior much of the handsome Eighteenth Century paneled woodwork is intact and is of excellent quality. From an inscription found cut in a beam in the old bam, we can assume that the house was standing in 1766, It is believed the farmhouse was built by Henry and Abraham Wyckoff, During the American Revolution, Hessian officers were quartered there. At least one of them recorded a lasting impression on the four-by-seven window panes with a sharp instrument, possibly a diamond. Two of these original panes are carefully preserved by the owners of the house. One is inscribed with the name "Toepfer Capt, of Regt. de Ditfurth" and the other "M, Bach Lieutenant Hessen Hanau Artillerie", In the two centuries of its existence, only two family names arc associated with, this house. In 1835 the farm, consisting of about one hundred acres and certain meadows and woodlands, as well as pew number sixty-two in the old Gravesend Dutch Reformed Church, were bought by Cornelius W. Bennett. The land was farmed by the family until the turn of this century. Four generations of the Bennett family have lived in the house since it was purchased from the Wyckoffs. - From the 1968 NYCLPC Landmark Designation Report
Wyckoff-Bennett Homestead
Wyckoff-Bennett Homestead
Midwood, Brooklyn, New York City, New York, United States Singularly distinguished by its fine scale and proportion, this one and one-half story frame dwelling is a handsome example of one of the few remaining Eighteenth Century Dutch Colonial farmhouses still standing in Brooklyn, It- is modest in size and in an excellent state of preservation; two hundred years of wear have done little to diminish the simple beauty of its clear cut profile and the dignity of its related parts. It has been declared, by Maud Dilliard the historian, to be the most beautiful example of Dutch Colonial architecture in Brooklyn. The house is rectangular in plan with an extension on the northern end containing a kitchen and a room that in earlier days was used for a milk house. In the late 1890*s, when the land was divided into lots, streets were put through and the house, which faced south, was turned around to face the west. The structure was placed upon a brick foundation, and dormers were added. A long porch extends the width of the south exposure, and six slender columns support the roof which is swept down over the porch area in a gentle curve. The upper half of the horizontally divided front door (dutch door) contains two original thick, bluish green windows called bulls eyes. In the interior much of the handsome Eighteenth Century paneled woodwork is intact and is of excellent quality. From an inscription found cut in a beam in the old bam, we can assume that the house was standing in 1766, It is believed the farmhouse was built by Henry and Abraham Wyckoff, During the American Revolution, Hessian officers were quartered there. At least one of them recorded a lasting impression on the four-by-seven window panes with a sharp instrument, possibly a diamond. Two of these original panes are carefully preserved by the owners of the house. One is inscribed with the name "Toepfer Capt, of Regt. de Ditfurth" and the other "M, Bach Lieutenant Hessen Hanau Artillerie", In the two centuries of its existence, only two family names arc associated with, this house. In 1835 the farm, consisting of about one hundred acres and certain meadows and woodlands, as well as pew number sixty-two in the old Gravesend Dutch Reformed Church, were bought by Cornelius W. Bennett. The land was farmed by the family until the turn of this century. Four generations of the Bennett family have lived in the house since it was purchased from the Wyckoffs. - From the 1968 NYCLPC Landmark Designation Report

homestead extended stay hotel
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