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Laws Tyres Aberdeen


laws tyres aberdeen
    aberdeen
  • a town in northeastern South Dakota
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    tyres
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    laws
  • An individual rule as part of such a system
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  • Torah: the first of three divisions of the Hebrew Scriptures comprising the first five books of the Hebrew Bible considered as a unit

Gight castle (4 of 5) The Great Hall
Gight castle (4 of 5) The Great Hall
(Continued from previous photo) William Gordon of Gight, perhaps because of his wounds, dropped out of sight for a while, although in April of 1595, he was excommunicated. It would appear that this was a response to the Donnibristle affair, because at the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland in March of the following year, his arrest was ordered, and an order issued that the lairds of Gight and Cluny should be “chargeit to come south” and place themselves in ward. What became of it all, is again not recorded, but not much it would appear, because nine months later, in January 1597, he was made a Burgess of Aberdeen, an honour he had first received back in 1582, but had perhaps lost for one reasson or another in the interim! In June 1597, he was one of the sureties to George, Earl of Huntly, who had given a caution of twenty thousand pounds, that he would not communicate with Jesuits. The reformation was still very much at its height then in Scotland, and dealings with Catholics, together with any form of religious freedom, were strictly banned. In 1601, having apparently tired of his feuds with the Keiths and the church, the laird of Gight turned his attentions to the Mowats and the Hays. In September of that year, Magnus Mowat of Bulquholie (now called Hatton, near Turriff in Aberdeenshire) complained to the Privy Council that, although he and his family had “peaceably possessed” the lands of Balmelie and others specified “past memory of man”, “yet William Gordon of Gight, John and Alexander his sons, and George Gordon of Bridgend, envying the pursuer’s possession, and not content to live in peace, as becomes Christians, continually do trouble and molest him.” Apparently, the trouble started when George Gordon of Bridgend, the neighboring property, came onto Balmelie land and started building the stone walls for a sheep pen. When John Mowat attempted to stop the construction, the Gordons shot and wounded him, and later “wounded him with a sword”. The following month, Gordon of Gight, with twenty of his men, armed with “hagbuts, pistolets, swords, and lances; came onto the lands of Balquholie, trampled the corn, wounded one of Mowat’s servitors and threatened others”. The following day, the Gordons returned, this time with 300 men on horse and foot, and “trampled down and destroyed” more of the Mowat’s corn. Later that month, William’s son John Gordon of Gight and a number of other “evil disposed persons” went onto some other Mowat farms, where they broke open doors and windows of the tenant’s houses, “sought out the occupants for their slaughter”, and apprehended and carried off a William Smyth, to Gight Castle. The Gordons were all charged to appear before the Privy Council, and perhaps not surprisingly, failed to appear! Three months later, a messenger, Alexander Chalmers, was returning from the Privy Council with letters charging William Gordon to “answer for certain crimes”, when he was pursued by the Gordons and captured. On being brought to William Gordon (probably in the room in this photo), the laird “would have shot him with a pistolet, if he had not been stayed by another person present”. Gordon then took the letters and “kaist them in a dish of bree” and forced the unfortunate Chalmers to “sup and swallow thame” while he “held ane drawne dagger foiranent his heart, avowing with mony horrible and blasphemous oaths to have thrust the dagger throw his heart if he had not suppit the said copys.” Unfortunately, William Gordon later found out that the letters that he had forced Chalmers to eat, were only copies, and that Chalmers still had the originals in his sleeve. He “came to the said officer in a new rage and furie, raif the principle letters from his sleif, raif thame to pieces and kaist them into the fyre.” The only fallout from this incident, seems to have been that the following month, the Marquis of Huntly was rebuked “for carelessness in the execution of the laws within the bounds of his northern lieutenancy, and especially for his laxness in dealing with Gordon of Gight.” The vendetta with the Mowats was to drag on until at least 1610, with frequent mentions in the records, of “cautions” or bonds having to be found for the good behavior of the Gordons! As mentioned above, at the same time that William Gordon’s disagreement with the Mowats flared up, he also fell out with the Hays. In July 1601, while the Privy Council was drafting the letters that Chalmers was to eat, an incident occurred that was also to lead to a complaint to the Privy Council. On July 18th, William Gordon’s son John, and others, entered the town of Turriff and pursued Alexander Coupland and Ralph Ainslie, servitor to Francis, Earl of Erroll “for their lives, wounding Ainslie beyond hope of recovery.” William Gordon, having been informed of what had happened, rode into Turriff himself, and “enterit in communing with George Hay, parson and minister of Turriff”, telling him that “the whole i
The Gordons of Gight – 7 of 9
The Gordons of Gight – 7 of 9
The other stair from ground floor to first floor, was this small spiral stair, leading from the wine cellar to the Hall of the first floor. It was built within the wall thickness of the outside angle of the castle. Back to the story of William Gordon: (Continued from previous photo) . . . . . William Gordon of Gight, due no doubt to the absence of his Chief and perhaps also because of his wounds received at Glenlivet, dropped out of sight for a while, although in April of 1595, he was excommunicated. It would appear that this was in response to the Donnibristle affair, because at the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland in March of the following year, his arrest was ordered, and an order issued that the lairds of Gight and Cluny should be “chargeit to come south” and place themselves in ward. What became of it all, is again not recorded, but not much it would appear, because nine months later, in January 1597, he was made a Burgess of Aberdeen, an honour he had first received back in 1582, but had perhaps lost in the interim! In June 1597, he was one of the sureties to George, Earl of Huntly, who had given a caution of twenty thousand pounds, that he would not communicate with Jesuits. The reformation was still very much at its height then in Scotland, and dealings with Catholics, together with any form of religious freedom, were strictly banned. In 1601, having apparently tired of his feuds with the Keiths and the church, the laird of Gight turned his attentions to the Mowats and the Hays. In September of that year, Magnus Mowat of Bulquholie (now called Hatton, near Turriff in Aberdeenshire) complained to the Privy Council that, although he and his family had “peaceably possessed” the lands of Balmelie and others specified “past memory of man”, “yet William Gordon of Gight, John and Alexander his sons, and George Gordon of Bridgend, envying the pursuer’s possession, and not content to live in peace, as becomes Christians, continually do trouble and molest him.” Apparently, the trouble started when George Gordon of Bridgend, the neighboring property, came onto Balmelie land and started building the stone walls for a sheep pen. When John Mowat attempted to stop the construction, the Gordons shot and wounded him, and later “wounded him with a sword”. The following month, Gordon of Gight, with twenty of his men, armed with “hagbuts, pistolets, swords, and lances; came onto the lands of Balquholie, trampled the corn, wounded one of Mowat’s servitors and threatened others”. The following day, the Gordons returned, this time with 300 men on horse and foot, and “trampled down and destroyed” more of the Mowat’s corn. Later that month, William’s son John Gordon of Gight and a number of other “evil disposed persons” went onto some other Mowat farms, where they broke open doors and windows of the tenant’s houses, “sought out the occupants for their slaughter”, and apprehended and carried off a William Smyth, to Gight Castle. The Gordons were all charged to appear before the Privy Council, and perhaps not surprisingly, all failed to appear! Three months later, a messenger, Alexander Chalmers, was returning from the Privy Council with letters charging William Gordon to “answer for certain crimes”, when he was pursued by the Gordons and captured. On being brought to William Gordon, probably in the Hall here at Gight Castle, the laird “would have shot him with a pistolet, if he had not been stayed by another person present”. Gordon then took the letters and “kaist them in a dish of bree” and forced the unfortunate Chalmers to “sup and swallow thame” while he “held ane drawne dagger foiranent his heart, avowing with mony horrible and blasphemous oaths to have thrust the dagger throw his heart if he had not suppit the said copys.” Unfortunately, William Gordon later found out that the letters that he had forced Chalmers to eat, were only copies, and that Chalmers still had the originals in his sleeve. He “came to the said officer in a new rage and furie, raif the principle letters from his sleif, raif thame to pieces and kaist them into the fyre.” The only fallout from this incident, seems to have been that the following month, the Marquis of Huntly was rebuked “for carelessness in the execution of the laws within the bounds of his northern lieutenancy, and especially for his laxness in dealing with Gordon of Gight.” The vendetta with the Mowats was to drag on until at least 1610, with frequent mentions in the records, of “cautions” or bonds having to be found for the good behavior of the Gordons! (Continued next photo)

laws tyres aberdeen
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